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They Called Them Greasers

Author: Arnoldo De León
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 0292789505
Size: 39.77 MB
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Tension between Anglos and Tejanos has existed in the Lone Star State since the earliest settlements. Such antagonism has produced friction between the two peoples, and whites have expressed their hostility toward Mexican Americans unabashedly and at times violently. This seminal work in the historical literature of race relations in Texas examines the attitudes of whites toward Mexicans in nineteenth-century Texas. For some, it will be disturbing reading. But its unpleasant revelations are based on extensive and thoughtful research into Texas' past. The result is important reading not merely for historians but for all who are concerned with the history of ethnic relations in our state. They Called Them Greasers argues forcefully that many who have written about Texas's past—including such luminaries as Walter Prescott Webb, Eugene C. Barker, and Rupert N. Richardson—have exhibited, in fact and interpretation, both deficiencies of research and detectable bias when their work has dealt with Anglo-Mexican relations. De León asserts that these historians overlooled an austere Anglo moral code which saw the morality of Tejanos as "defective" and that they described without censure a society that permitted traditional violence to continue because that violence allowed Anglos to keep ethnic minorities "in their place." De León's approach is psychohistorical. Many Anglos in nineteenth-century Texas saw Tejanos as lazy, lewd, un-American, subhuman. In De León's view, these attitudes were the product of a conviction that dark-skinned people were racially and culturally inferior, of a desire to see in others qualities that Anglos preferred not to see in themselves, and of a need to associate Mexicans with disorder so as to justify their continued subjugation.

They Called Them Greasers

Author: Arnoldo De León
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 9780292780545
Size: 46.67 MB
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Examines the prejudices of Texans against Mexican Americans and discusses the relations between the white and Mexican inhabitants of Texas

War Along The Border

Author: Arnoldo De León
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
ISBN: 1603445706
Size: 40.36 MB
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Table of Contents:Foreword, Tatcho MindiolaIntroduction, Arnoldo De LeónBeyond Borders: Causes and Consequences of the Mexican Revolution, Paul HartThe Mexican Revolution’s Impact on Tejano Communities: The Historiographic Record, Arnoldo De León La Rinchada: Revolution, Revenge, and the Rangers, 1910–1920, Richard RibbThe Mexican Revolution, Revolución de Texas, and Matanza de1915, Trinidad Gonzales The El Paso Race Riot of 1916, Miguel A. Levario The Mexican Revolution and the Women of El México de Afuera, the Pan American Round Table, and the Cruz AzulMexicana, Juanita Luna LawhnWomen’s Labor and Activism in the Greater Mexican Borderlands, 1910–1930, Sonia Hernández Salt of the Earth: The Immigrant Experience of Gerónimo Treviño, Roberto R. Treviño Sleuthing Immigrant Origins: Felix Tijerina and His Mexican Revolution Roots, Thomas H. Kreneck “The Population Is Overwhelmingly Mexican; Most of It Is in Sympathy with the Revolution . . . .”: Mexico’s Revolution of 1910 and the Tejano Community in the Big Bend, John Eusebio KlingemannSmuggling in Dangerous Times: Revolution and Communities in the Tejano Borderlands, George T. DíazEureka! The Mexican Revolution in African American Context, 1910–1920, Gerald Horne and Margaret StevensUnderstanding Greater Revolutionary Mexico: The Case for a Transnational Border History, Raúl A. RamosSelected BibliographyAbout the ContributorsIndex

Lulac Mexican Americans And National Policy

Author: Craig Allan Kaplowitz
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
ISBN: 1603445986
Size: 59.73 MB
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In the 1960s, LULAC won protection for Mexican Americans from discrimination based on racial, cultural, and linguistic disadvantages. Here, Kaplowitz draws on primary sources to understand and explain the federal policy arena in which the identity issues and power politics of LULAC were played out. He also examines the internal tensions between LULAC members' ethnic allegiances and their identity as American citizens.

Mexican Americans And World War Ii

Author: Maggie Rivas-Rodriguez
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 9780292706811
Size: 80.36 MB
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A valuable book and the first significant scholarship on Mexican Americans in World War II. Up to 750,000 Mexican American men served in World War II, earning more Medals of Honor and other decorations in proportion to their numbers than any other ethnic group.

North To Aztlan

Author: Arnoldo De Leon
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
ISBN:
Size: 44.21 MB
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Traces the history of Mexican Americans in the United States, examining the native roots, culture, society, lifestyle, politics, and art of Mexican Americans, and discussing their contributions to American history and mainstream culture, immigration before and after the twentieth century, and other related topics.

Quixote S Soldiers

Author: David Montejano
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 0292778643
Size: 65.16 MB
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In the mid-1960s, San Antonio, Texas, was a segregated city governed by an entrenched Anglo social and business elite. The Mexican American barrios of the west and south sides were characterized by substandard housing and experienced seasonal flooding. Gang warfare broke out regularly. Then the striking farmworkers of South Texas marched through the city and set off a social movement that transformed the barrios and ultimately brought down the old Anglo oligarchy. In Quixote's Soldiers, David Montejano uses a wealth of previously untapped sources, including the congressional papers of Henry B. Gonzalez, to present an intriguing and highly readable account of this turbulent period. Montejano divides the narrative into three parts. In the first part, he recounts how college student activists and politicized social workers mobilized barrio youth and mounted an aggressive challenge to both Anglo and Mexican American political elites. In the second part, Montejano looks at the dynamic evolution of the Chicano movement and the emergence of clear gender and class distinctions as women and ex-gang youth struggled to gain recognition as serious political actors. In the final part, Montejano analyzes the failures and successes of movement politics. He describes the work of second-generation movement organizations that made possible a new and more representative political order, symbolized by the election of Mayor Henry Cisneros in 1981.

The Tejano Community 1836 1900

Author: Arnoldo De León
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 26.85 MB
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A revisionist portrait of Mexican American life in nineteenth-century Texas, The Tejano Community combines extensive research, penetrating insight, and critical analysis to support De León's contention that Tejanos were active agents in establishing communities and a bicultural heritage in Texas because of the resilience of their social institutions and a commitment to hard work. In this pioneering study, De León examines politics, urban and rural work patterns, religion, folklore, culture, and community. Overturning earlier views, he shows that the Tejanos were energetic, enterprising, success-oriented, as well as interested in and active participants in politics. De León's work has initiated a reevaluation of the Tejano experience in Texas. First published by the University of New Mexico Press in 1982, The Tejano Community is now considered a minor classic and remains a core study of Tejano life that continues to stimulate scholarship throughout the field of ethnic studies.

Fronteras

Author: Jerry D. Thompson
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
ISBN: 1603444513
Size: 78.51 MB
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Did this border caudillo fight to defend the rights, honor, and legal claims of the Mexicans of South Texas, as he claimed? Or was his a quest for personal vengeance against the newcomers who had married into his family, threatened his mother's land holdings, and insulted his honor?

El Paso Del Norte

Author: Richard Yañez
Publisher: University of Nevada Press
ISBN: 9780874175332
Size: 58.59 MB
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The Chicano characters in Richard Yanez's debut story collection live in El Paso's Lower Valley but inhabit a number of borders-between two countries, two languages, and two cultures, between childhood and manhood, life and death. The teenaged narrator of Desert Vista copes with a new school and a first love while negotiating the boundaries between his family's tenuous middle-class status and the working-class community in which they have come to live. Tony Amoroza, the protagonist of Amoroza Tires, wrestles with the overwhelming grief from his wife's death until an unexpected legacy prompts him with new faith. Maria del Valle, La Loquita, the central character of Lucero's Mkt., crosses the border into madness while her neighbors watch, gossip, and try to offer-or refuse-aid. Yanez writes with perfect understanding of his borderland setting, a landscape where poverty and violence impinge on traditional Mexican-American values, where the signs of gang culture compete with the ageless rituals of the Church. His characters are vivid, unique, fully authentic, searching for purpose or identity, for hope or meaning, in lives that seem to deny them almost everything. Yanez's world