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Thirty Eight

Author: Stephen Long
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300209517
Size: 74.51 MB
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A groundbreaking account of the cataclysmic hurricane of 1938 and its devastating impact on New England s inland forests"

Sudden Sea

Author: R.A. Scotti
Publisher: Back Bay Books
ISBN: 031605478X
Size: 73.26 MB
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The massive destruction wreaked by the Hurricane of 1938 dwarfed that of the Chicago Fire, the San Francisco Earthquake, and the Mississippi floods of 1927, making the storm the worst natural disaster in U.S. history. Now, R.A. Scotti tells the story.

A Wind To Shake The World

Author: Everett S. Allen
Publisher: PediaPress
ISBN: 9780316034265
Size: 38.89 MB
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The thrilling story of the hurricane of 1938, the worst New England storm of the 20th century, as told by a reporter whose first day on the New Bedford waterfront was the day the storm blew in.

Freedom Journey

Author: Edythe Ann Quinn
Publisher: SUNY Press
ISBN: 1438455399
Size: 40.41 MB
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The story of thirty-six African American men who drew upon their shared community of The Hills for support as they fought in the Civil War. Through wonderfully detailed letters, recruit rosters, and pension records, Edythe Ann Quinn shares the story of thirty-five African American Civil War soldiers and the United States Colored Troop (USCT) regiments with which they served. Associated with The Hills community in Westchester County, New York, the soldiers served in three regiments: the 29th Connecticut Infantry, 14th Rhode Island Heavy Artillery (11th USCT), and the 20th USCT. The thirty-sixth Hills man served in the Navy. Their ties to family, land, church, school, and occupational experiences at home buffered the brutal indifference of boredom and battle, the ravages of illness, the deprivations of unequal pay, and the hostility of some commissioned officers and white troops. At the same time, their service among kith and kin bolstered their determination and pride. They marched together, first as raw recruits, and finally as seasoned veterans, welcomed home by generals, politicians, and above all, their families and friends. “Quinn’s meticulous research and refined historical interpretation has allowed her to recover a uniquely enlightening chapter of nineteenth-century African American history in the North. By tracing the lives of Union soldiers from a free, black community in Westchester County, New York, we discover the commitment of these men and their families from The Hills to the eradication of slavery in the South. With notable sensitivity, the author produces a tale of black men who risked their lives and the security of their families for the sake of freedom. It is a story about conviction—poignant, inspiring, and persuasive.” — Myra Young Armstead, editor of Mighty Change, Tall Within: Black Identity in the Hudson Valley “As an in-depth case study of the African American volunteers from The Hills community who served in the Civil War, Edythe Ann Quinn’s Freedom Journey is a well-researched book that explores a much needed ethnic aspect of that war. For those interested in genealogy and local history, Freedom Journey offers unique insights into the social and cultural history of The Hills community, first settled in the 1790s. Additionally, the work contains a roster of the volunteers and thirteen historical sidebars that relate to the African American wartime experience.” — Anthony F. Gero, author of Black Soldiers of New York State: A Proud Legacy “Edythe Ann Quinn has taken a little-known community, The Hills in Westchester County, and using a comprehensively well-resourced and researched methodology, has written not only an enjoyable and engagingly attractive family history (individual and collective) of black New Yorkers from slavery to freedom, but as well the sacrifices that the community’s young men gave. It is the voices of those sable warriors that are heard through the personal letters, woven into the overall engaging literary style of the author.” — A. J. Williams-Myers, author of Long Hammering: Essays on the Forging of an African American Presence in the Hudson River Valley to the Early Twentieth Century

The Cure For Catastrophe

Author: Robert Muir-Wood
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 0465096476
Size: 56.26 MB
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We can’t stop natural disasters, but we can stop them from being disastrous. One of the world’s foremost risk experts tells us how. Year after year, floods sweep cities clean, earthquakes tear apart communities, and tornadoes uproot towns. Disasters bring with them rampage and despair. But does it have to be this way? In The Cure for Catastrophe, Robert Muir-Wood makes the controversial claim that our natural disasters are in fact human ones: we keep building in the wrong places and in the wrong way, putting brick buildings in the way of earthquakes, wood ones in the way of fire, and cities in the paths of tropical storms. We refuse to evacuate, blindly trusting our flood walls and disaster preparations, until they fail, making catastrophes even more deadly. From the great Lisbon earthquake of 1755 to Hurricane Katrina, the story of natural disasters is less about a hostile environment than about human foolishness, denial, and greed. But there is hope, if humans cause catastrophes, we can also prevent them.

Historical Dictionary Of New England

Author: Peter C. Holloran
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1538102196
Size: 58.62 MB
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New England, the most clearly defined region in the United States, includes the six states of Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont. First colonized by the French in 1604 and the British in 1607, the New England colonies were the first to secede from the British Empire and were among the first states admitted to the union. No region has claimed more presidents as native sons (seven) or produced more men and women of exceptional accomplishment and fame. Many Americans see New England as a touchstone for the founding ideas of the nation, and the region served as a source of inspiration for many artists and writers. This second edition of Historical Dictionary of New England contains a chronology, an introduction, appendix, and an extensive bibliography. The dictionary section has over 700 cross-referenced entries on important personalities, places, institutions, and events. This book is an excellent resource for students, researchers, and anyone wanting to know more about New England.

Eruption The Untold Story Of Mount St Helens

Author: Steve Olson
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393242803
Size: 14.10 MB
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Survival narrative meets scientific, natural, and social history in the riveting story of a volcanic disaster. For months in early 1980, scientists, journalists, sightseers, and nearby residents listened anxiously to rumblings in Mount St. Helens, part of the chain of western volcanoes fueled by the 700-mile-long Cascadia fault. Still, no one was prepared when an immense eruption took the top off of the mountain and laid waste to hundreds of square miles of verdant forests in southwestern Washington State. The eruption was one of the largest in human history, deposited ash in eleven U.S. states and five Canadian provinces, and caused more than one billion dollars in damage. It killed fifty-seven people, some as far as thirteen miles away from the volcano’s summit. Shedding new light on the cataclysm, author Steve Olson interweaves the history and science behind this event with page-turning accounts of what happened to those who lived and those who died. Powerful economic and historical forces influenced the fates of those around the volcano that sunny Sunday morning, including the construction of the nation’s railroads, the harvest of a continent’s vast forests, and the protection of America’s treasured public lands. The eruption of Mount St. Helens revealed how the past is constantly present in the lives of us all. At the same time, it transformed volcanic science, the study of environmental resilience, and, ultimately, our perceptions of what it will take to survive on an increasingly dangerous planet. Rich with vivid personal stories of lumber tycoons, loggers, volcanologists, and conservationists, Eruption delivers a spellbinding narrative built from the testimonies of those closest to the disaster, and an epic tale of our fraught relationship with the natural world.