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Ties That Bind

Author: Tiya Miles
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520961021
Size: 12.62 MB
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This beautifully written book, now in its second edition, tells the haunting saga of a quintessentially American family. In the late 1790s, Shoe Boots, a famed Cherokee warrior and successful farmer, acquired an African slave named Doll. Over the next thirty years, Shoe Boots and Doll lived together as master and slave and also as lifelong partners who, with their children and grandchildren, experienced key events in American history—including slavery, the Creek War, the founding of the Cherokee Nation and subsequent removal of Native Americans along the Trail of Tears, and the Civil War. This is the gripping story of their lives, in slavery and in freedom. Meticulously crafted from historical and literary sources, Ties That Bind vividly portrays the members of the Shoeboots family. Doll emerges as an especially poignant character, whose life is mostly known through the records of things done to her—her purchase, her marriage, the loss of her children—but also through her moving petition to the federal government for the pension owed to her as Shoe Boots's widow. A sensitive rendition of the hard realities of black slavery within Native American nations, the book provides the fullest picture we have of the myriad complexities, ironies, and tensions among African Americans, Native Americans, and whites in the first half of the nineteenth century. Updated with a new preface and an appendix of key primary sources, this remains an essential book for students of Native American history, African American history, and the history of race and ethnicity in the United States.

Stolen Childhood

Author: Wilma King
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 0253222648
Size: 62.34 MB
Format: PDF
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One of the most important books published on slave society, Stolen Childhood focuses on the millions of children and youth enslaved in 19th-century America. This enlarged and revised edition reflects the abundance of new scholarship on slavery that has emerged in the 15 years since the first edition. While the structure of the book remains the same, Wilma King has expanded its scope to include the international dimension with a new chapter on the transatlantic trade in African children, and the book's geographic boundaries now embrace slave-born children in the North. She includes data about children owned by Native Americans and African Americans, and presents new information about children's knowledge of and participation in the abolitionist movement and the interactions between enslaved and free children.

The House On Diamond Hill

Author: Tiya Miles
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 0807834181
Size: 48.69 MB
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"Displaying pitch-perfect sensibility that weaves profound human empathy with piercing scholarly critique, Tiya Miles lays open the suffering: of all those who found themselves enmeshed in the world of Diamond Hill. At once monument and memorial, the Vann House is Cherokee, African, and American slavery writ large."--- I AMi: s F. brooks, author of Captives and Cousins: Shivery, kinship, and Community in the Southwest Borderlands "This is one of the most thoughtful, beautifully written works of history on any topic that I have read in a long while. Miles has taken a complex set of issues that have been long obscured by a desire for a romantic and guilt-free past, and with grace and sensitivity, has completely re-written history."--- Leslie M. Harris. Emory University A James Vann, a Cherokee and entrepreneur, established Diamond Hill, the most famous plantation in the southeastern Cherokee Nation. Tiya Miles tells the story of this plantations founding, its flourishing, its takeover by white land-lottery winners on the eve of the Cherokee Removal, its decay, and ultimately its renovation in the 1950s. Indeed, this is the first full-length study to reconstruct the history of the Diamond Hill plantation, a cosmopolitan hub of activity where more than one hundred slaves of African descent lived and labored, contributing significandy to the Vann family's famed wealth. This moving multiracial history sheds light on the various cultural communities that interacted within the plantation boundaries---from elite Cherokee slaveholders to Cherokee subsistence farmers, from black slaves of various ethnic backgrounds to free blacks from the North and South, from German-speaking Moravian missionaries to white southern skilled laborers. Moreover, the book paints rich portraits of the women of these various communities, including Peggy Scott Vann, mistress of Diamond Hill; Pleasant, an enslaved black woman owned by the Moravian Church; and Anna Rosina Gambold, a Moravian missionary diarist. Vividly written and extensively researched, this history illuminates gender, class, and cross-racial relationships on the southern frontier of present-day Georgia.

Why You Can T Teach United States History Without American Indians

Author: Susan Sleeper-Smith
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469621215
Size: 34.58 MB
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A resource for all who teach and study history, this book illuminates the unmistakable centrality of American Indian history to the full sweep of American history. The nineteen essays gathered in this collaboratively produced volume, written by leading scholars in the field of Native American history, reflect the newest directions of the field and are organized to follow the chronological arc of the standard American history survey. Contributors reassess major events, themes, groups of historical actors, and approaches--social, cultural, military, and political--consistently demonstrating how Native American people, and questions of Native American sovereignty, have animated all the ways we consider the nation's past. The uniqueness of Indigenous history, as interwoven more fully in the American story, will challenge students to think in new ways about larger themes in U.S. history, such as settlement and colonization, economic and political power, citizenship and movements for equality, and the fundamental question of what it means to be an American. Contributors are Chris Andersen, Juliana Barr, David R. M. Beck, Jacob Betz, Paul T. Conrad, Mikal Brotnov Eckstrom, Margaret D. Jacobs, Adam Jortner, Rosalyn R. LaPier, John J. Laukaitis, K. Tsianina Lomawaima, Robert J. Miller, Mindy J. Morgan, Andrew Needham, Jean M. O'Brien, Jeffrey Ostler, Sarah M. S. Pearsall, James D. Rice, Phillip H. Round, Susan Sleeper-Smith, and Scott Manning Stevens.

Black Slaves Indian Masters

Author: Barbara Krauthamer
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469607115
Size: 47.79 MB
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From the late eighteenth century through the end of the Civil War, Choctaw and Chickasaw Indians bought, sold, and owned Africans and African Americans as slaves, a fact that persisted after the tribes' removal from the Deep South to Indian Territory. The tribes formulated racial and gender ideologies that justified this practice and marginalized free black people in the Indian nations well after the Civil War and slavery had ended. Through the end of the nineteenth century, ongoing conflicts among Choctaw, Chickasaw, and U.S. lawmakers left untold numbers of former slaves and their descendants in the two Indian nations without citizenship in either the Indian nations or the United States. In this groundbreaking study, Barbara Krauthamer rewrites the history of southern slavery, emancipation, race, and citizenship to reveal the centrality of Native American slaveholders and the black people they enslaved. Krauthamer's examination of slavery and emancipation highlights the ways Indian women's gender roles changed with the arrival of slavery and changed again after emancipation and reveals complex dynamics of race that shaped the lives of black people and Indians both before and after removal.

The New Encyclopedia Of Southern Culture

Author: Thomas C. Holt
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469607247
Size: 79.47 MB
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There is no denying that race is a critical issue in understanding the South. However, this concluding volume of The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture challenges previous understandings, revealing the region's rich, ever-expanding diversity and providing new explorations of race relations. In 36 thematic and 29 topical essays, contributors examine such subjects as the Tuskegee Syphilis Study, Japanese American incarceration in the South, relations between African Americans and Native Americans, Chinese men adopting Mexican identities, Latino religious practices, and Vietnamese life in the region. Together the essays paint a nuanced portrait of how concepts of race in the South have influenced its history, art, politics, and culture beyond the familiar binary of black and white.

Freedom S Frontier

Author: Stacey L. Smith
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469607697
Size: 20.50 MB
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Most histories of the Civil War era portray the struggle over slavery as a conflict that exclusively pitted North against South, free labor against slave labor, and black against white. In Freedom's Frontier, Stacey L. Smith examines the battle over slavery as it unfolded on the multiracial Pacific Coast. Despite its antislavery constitution, California was home to a dizzying array of bound and semibound labor systems: African American slavery, American Indian indenture, Latino and Chinese contract labor, and a brutal sex traffic in bound Indian and Chinese women. Using untapped legislative and court records, Smith reconstructs the lives of California's unfree workers and documents the political and legal struggles over their destiny as the nation moved through the Civil War, emancipation, and Reconstruction. Smith reveals that the state's anti-Chinese movement, forged in its struggle over unfree labor, reached eastward to transform federal Reconstruction policy and national race relations for decades to come. Throughout, she illuminates the startling ways in which the contest over slavery's fate included a western struggle that encompassed diverse labor systems and workers not easily classified as free or slave, black or white.

Enslaved Women In America An Encyclopedia

Author: Daina Ramey Berry Ph.D.
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 0313349096
Size: 60.88 MB
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This singular reference provides an authoritative account of the daily lives of enslaved women in the United States, from colonial times to emancipation following the Civil War. Through essays, photos, and primary source documents, the female experience is explored, and women are depicted as central, rather than marginal, figures in history. • Dozens of photos of former enslaved women • Detailed historical timeline • Numerous rare primary documents, including runaway slave advertisements and even a plantation recipe for turtle soup • Profiles of noted female slaves and their works

Das Haus Des Windes

Author: Louise Erdrich
Publisher: Aufbau Digital
ISBN: 3841207650
Size: 18.65 MB
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National Book Award für den besten Roman des Jahres. Ein altes Haus, eine ungesühnte Schuld und die Brüste von Tante Sonja – Louise Erdrich, liebevolle Chronistin der amerikanischen Ureinwohner, führt uns nach North Dakota. Im Zentrum ihres gefeierten Romans steht der 14jährige Joe, der ein brutales Verbrechen an seiner Mutter rächt und dabei zum Mann wird. Im Sommer 1988 wird die Mutter des 14-jährigen Joe Coutts Opfer eines brutalen Verbrechens. Sie schließt sich in ihrem Zimmer ein und verweigert die Aussage. Vater und Sohn wissen nicht, wie sie sie zurück ins Leben holen können. Da sich der Überfall auf der Nahtstelle dreier Territorien ereignet hat, sind drei Behörden mit den Ermittlungen befasst. Selbst Joes Vater sind als Stammesrichter die Hände gebunden. So beschließt Joe, den Gewalttäter selbst zu finden. Mit seinen Freunden Cappy, Angus und Zack unternimmt er teils halsbrecherische, teils urkomische Ermittlungsversuche. Bei seiner aufreizenden Tante und im Kreis katholischer Pfadfinderinnen begegnet er der Liebe – und in alten Akten dem Schlüssel des Verbrechens. Monatelang auf der New-York-Times-Bestsellerliste, ausgezeichnet als bester Roman des Jahres, überhäuft mit Kritiker- und Leserlob: Eine der großen Autorinnen unserer Tage hat ihr brillantestes Buch geschrieben – zart, sehr traurig und sehr lustig. „Eine beeindruckende menschliche Geschichte. Erdrich dringt in den dunkelsten Winkel eines Menschen und so zum Grund der Wahrheit über eine ganze Gemeinschaft vor“ Maria Russo, New York Times Book Review.