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Too Heavy A Load

Author: Deborah Gray White
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 9780393319927
Size: 17.71 MB
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Chronicles one hundred years in the struggle of African American women to attain equality and to establish a resistance to persistent racism and negative stereotyping

Too Heavy A Load

Author: Deborah Gray White
Publisher: W W Norton & Company Incorporated
ISBN: 9780393046670
Size: 18.27 MB
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Chronicles one hundred years in the struggle of African-American women to attain equality and to establish a resistance to persistent racism, male chauvinism, and negative sterotyping, assessing black women's role in the battle for civil rights and women's rights.

Black Women In White America

Author: Gerda Lerner
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0679743146
Size: 42.21 MB
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Compiles letters, articles, and essays on the racial and sexual oppression of Black women in America and the ways in which they have managed to survive in a white-dominated society

Ar N T I A Woman

Author: Deborah Gray White
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 9780393314816
Size: 77.31 MB
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Explores the contributions made by enslaved women to the family's economy and suggests they achieved a greater degree of equality with their men than white women

Hine Sight

Author: Darlene Clark Hine
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 9780253211248
Size: 30.93 MB
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"The history of African American women has become an important topic in the intellectual life of this country in the last fifteen years; and Darlene Clark Hine has been one of those most responsible for bringing the subject to its current level of importance." —from the Foreword by John Hope Franklin "In this absolutely needed collection of essays by one of the leading American historians of our generation, the richly intertwined community-making and self-making that shaped the historical experience of African American women shines out like a beacon." —Susan M. Reverby, Luella LaMer Associate Professor for Women's Studies, Wellesley College

What A Woman Ought To Be And To Do

Author: Stephanie J. Shaw
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226751309
Size: 78.82 MB
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Stephanie J. Shaw takes us into the inner world of American black professional women during the Jim Crow era. This is a story of struggle and empowerment, of the strength of a group of women who worked against daunting odds to improve the world for themselves and their people. Shaw's remarkable research into the lives of social workers, librarians, nurses, and teachers from the 1870s through the 1950s allows us to hear these women's voices for the first time. The women tell us, in their own words, about their families, their values, their expectations. We learn of the forces and factors that made them exceptional, and of the choices and commitments that made them leaders in their communities. What a Woman Ought to Be and to Do brings to life a world in which African-American families, communities, and schools worked to encourage the self-confidence, individual initiative, and social responsibility of girls. Shaw shows us how, in a society that denied black women full professional status, these girls embraced and in turn defined an ideal of "socially responsible individualism" that balanced private and public sphere responsibilities. A collective portrait of character shaped in the toughest circumstances, this book is more than a study of the socialization of these women as children and the organization of their work as adults. It is also a study of leadership—of how African American communities gave their daughters the power to succeed in and change a hostile world.

Lost In The Usa

Author: Deborah Gray White
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252099400
Size: 67.53 MB
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Remembered as an era of peace and prosperity, turn-of-the-millennium America was also a time of mass protest. But the political demands of the marchers seemed secondary to an urgent desire for renewal and restoration felt by people from all walks of life. Drawing on thousands of personal testimonies, Deborah Gray White explores how Americans sought better ways of living in, and dealing with, a rapidly changing world. From the Million Man, Million Woman, and Million Mom Marches to the Promise Keepers and LGBT protests, White reveals a people lost in their own country. Mass gatherings offered a chance to bond with like-minded others against a relentless tide of loneliness and isolation. By participating, individuals opened a door to self-discovery that energized their quests for order, autonomy, personal meaning, and fellowship in a society that seemed hostile to such deeper human needs. Moving forward in time, White also shows what marchers found out about themselves and those gathered around them. The result is an eye-opening reconsideration of a defining time in contemporary America.

We Specialize In The Wholly Impossible

Author: Darlene Clark Hine
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0926019813
Size: 11.14 MB
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Contains essays which share the experiences and emphasize the achievements and struggles of Black women from colonial times through the 20th century

African American Women And The Vote 1837 1965

Author: Ann Dexter Gordon
Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press
ISBN: 9781558490598
Size: 69.73 MB
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Written by leading scholars of African American and women's history, the essays in this volume seek to reconceptualize the political history of black women in the United States by placing them "at the center of our thinking." The book explores how slavery, racial discrimination, and gender shaped the goals that African American women set for themselves, their families, and their race and looks at the political tools at their disposal. By identifying key turning points for black women, the essays create a new chronology and a new paradigm for historical analysis. The chronology begins in 1837 with the interracial meeting of antislavery women in New York City and concludes with the civil rights movement of the 1960s. The contributors focus on specific examples of women pursuing a dual ambition: to gain full civil and political rights and to improve the social conditions of African Americans. Together, the essays challenge us to rethink common generalizations that govern much of our historical thinking about the experience of African American women. Contributors include Bettina Aptheker, Elsa Barkley Brown, Willi Coleman, Gerald R. Gill, Ann D. Gordon, Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham, Cynthia Neverdon-Morton, Martha Prescod Norman, Janice Sumler-Edmond, Rosalyn Terborg-Penn, and Bettye Collier-Thomas.

Disfigured Images

Author: Patricia Morton
Publisher: Greenwood Pub Group
ISBN:
Size: 26.74 MB
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"Much of the material unearthed by this book is ugly," states historiographer Patricia Morton who exposes "profoundly dehumanizing constructions of reality embedded in American scholarship" as it has attempted to render the history of the Afro-American woman. Focusing on the scholarly "literature of fact" rather than on fictional or popular portrayals, Disfigured Images explores the telling--and frequent mis-telling--of the story of black women during a century of American historiography beginning in the late nineteenth century and extending to the present. Morton finds that during this period, a large body of scholarly literature was generated that "presented little fact and much fiction" about black women's history. The book's ten chapters take long and lingering looks at the black woman's "prefabricated" past. Contemporary revisionist studies with their goals of discovering and articulating the real nature of the slave woman's experience and role are thoroughly examined in the conclusion. Disfigured Images complements current work by recognizing in its findings a long-needed refutation of a caricatured, mythical version of black women's history. Morton's introduction presents an overview of her subject emphasizing the mythical, ingrained nature of the black woman's image in historiography as a "natural and permanent slave." The succeeding chapters use historical and social science works as primary sources to explore such issues as the foundations of sexism-racism, the writing of W.E.B. DuBois, twentieth century notions of black women, current black and women's studies, new and old images of motherhood, and more. The conclusion investigates how and why recent American historiographical scholarship has banished the old myths by presenting a more accurate history of black women. This keenly perceptive and original study should find an influential place in both women's studies and black studies programs as well as in American history, American literature, and sociology departments. With its unusually complete panorama of the period covered it would be a unique and valuable addition to courses such as slavery, the American South, women in (North) American history, Afro-American history, race and sex in American literature and discourse, and the sociology of race.