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Torchbearers Of Democracy

Author: Chad L. Williams
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807899359
Size: 11.72 MB
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For the 380,000 African American soldiers who fought in World War I, Woodrow Wilson's charge to make the world "safe for democracy" carried life-or-death meaning. Chad L. Williams reveals the central role of African American soldiers in the global conflict and how they, along with race activists and ordinary citizens, committed to fighting for democracy at home and beyond. Using a diverse range of sources, Torchbearers of Democracy reclaims the legacy of African American soldiers and veterans and connects their history to issues such as the obligations of citizenship, combat and labor, diaspora and internationalism, homecoming and racial violence, "New Negro" militancy, and African American memories of the war.

1919 The Year Of Racial Violence

Author: David F. Krugler
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107061792
Size: 65.64 MB
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Krugler recounts African Americans' brave stand against a cascade of mob attacks in the United States after World War I.

A History Of Fort Worth In Black White

Author: Richard F. Selcer
Publisher: University of North Texas Press
ISBN: 1574416162
Size: 12.13 MB
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A History of Fort Worth in Black & White fills a long-empty niche on the Fort Worth bookshelf: a scholarly history of the city's black community that starts at the beginning with Ripley Arnold and the early settlers, and comes down to today with our current battles over education, housing, and representation in city affairs. The book's sidebars on some noted and some not-so-noted African Americans make it appealing as a school text as well as a book for the general reader. Using a wealth of primary sources, Richard Selcer dispels several enduring myths, for instance the mistaken belief that Camp Bowie trained only white soldiers, and the spurious claim that Fort Worth managed to avoid the racial violence that plagued other American cities in the twentieth century. Selcer arrives at some surprisingly frank conclusions that will challenge current politically correct notions.

Freedom Struggles

Author: Adriane Danette Lentz-Smith
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674054180
Size: 57.44 MB
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For many of the 200,000 black soldiers sent to Europe with the American Expeditionary Forces in World War I, encounters with French civilians and colonial African troops led them to imagine a world beyond Jim Crow. They returned home to join activists working to make that world real. In narrating the efforts of African American soldiers and activists to gain full citizenship rights as recompense for military service, Adriane Lentz-Smith illuminates how World War I mobilized a generation.

Red Summer

Author: Cameron McWhirter
Publisher: Henry Holt and Company
ISBN: 9781429972932
Size: 57.34 MB
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A narrative history of America's deadliest episode of race riots and lynchings After World War I, black Americans fervently hoped for a new epoch of peace, prosperity, and equality. Black soldiers believed their participation in the fight to make the world safe for democracy finally earned them rights they had been promised since the close of the Civil War. Instead, an unprecedented wave of anti-black riots and lynchings swept the country for eight months. From April to November of 1919, the racial unrest rolled across the South into the North and the Midwest, even to the nation's capital. Millions of lives were disrupted, and hundreds of lives were lost. Blacks responded by fighting back with an intensity and determination never seen before. Red Summer is the first narrative history written about this epic encounter. Focusing on the worst riots and lynchings—including those in Chicago, Washington, D.C., Charleston, Omaha and Knoxville—Cameron McWhirter chronicles the mayhem, while also exploring the first stirrings of a civil rights movement that would transform American society forty years later.

Lost Battalions

Author: Richard Slotkin
Publisher: Henry Holt and Company
ISBN: 1466860936
Size: 26.75 MB
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"A work of stunning density and penetrating analysis . . . Lost Battalions deploys a narrative symmetry of gratifying complexity."—David Levering Lewis, The Nation During the bloodiest days of World War I, no soldiers served more valiantly than the African American troops of the 369th Infantry—the fabled Harlem Hellfighters—and the legendary 77th "lost battalion" composed of New York City immigrants. Though these men had lived up to their side of the bargain as loyal American soldiers, the country to which they returned solidified laws and patterns of social behavior that had stigmatized them as second-class citizens. Richard Slotkin takes the pulse of a nation struggling with social inequality during a decisive historical moment, juxtaposing social commentary with battle scenes that display the bravery and solidarity of these men. Enduring grueling maneuvers, and the loss of so many of their brethren, the soldiers in the lost battalions were forever bound by their wartime experience. Both a riveting combat narrative and a brilliant social history, Lost Battalions delivers a richly detailed account of the fierce fight for equality in the shadow of a foreign war.

Major Problems In African American History Loose Leaf Version

Author: Barbara Krauthamer
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 1337516090
Size: 58.47 MB
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Krauthamer and Williams' text introduces students to both primary sources and analytical essays and is designed to encourage critical thinking about the history and culture of African Americans. Updated to cover a wider geographic scope that includes the western United States and other parts of the Diaspora, as well as the newest scholarship in the field, the second edition presents a carefully selected group of readings organized to allow students to evaluate primary sources, test the interpretations of distinguished historians, and draw their own conclusions. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Mobilizing Minerva

Author: Kimberly Jensen
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252074963
Size: 23.85 MB
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The case for woman suffrage, economic equality, and citizenship in WWI

Breaking The Heart Of The World

Author: John Milton Cooper
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521807869
Size: 47.87 MB
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An engaging narrative about the political fight over the League of Nations in the US.

Creating Gi Jane

Author: Leisa D. Meyer
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 9780231101455
Size: 21.42 MB
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Rights deriving from military service. Lesbians found the military simultaneously dangerous and conducive to community formation during and after the war. In this fresh, provocative analysis, Meyer offers compelling evidence that these struggles had lasting effects on larger civil rights movements that emerged in the postwar years.