Download transitional justice in the middle east and north africa in pdf or read transitional justice in the middle east and north africa in pdf online books in PDF, EPUB and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to get transitional justice in the middle east and north africa in pdf book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want.



Transitional Justice In The Middle East And North Africa

Author: Chandra Sriram
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780190628567
Size: 48.88 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 2531
Download and Read
Following the "Arab Spring" uprisings in the Middle East and North Africa, many had high hopes not only for democratization but also for transitional justice to address the myriad abuses that had taken place in the region, both during the uprisings and for decades prior to them. Protesters had called not only for removal of corrupt and abusive leaders, but also for the protection of human rights more generally, including socio-economic rights as well as civil and political rights. Despite these hopes, most of the transitions in the region have stalled, along with the possibility of transitional justice. This volume is the first to look at this process and brings together leading experts in the fields of human rights and transitional justice, and in the history, politics and justice systems of countries such as Egypt, Tunisia, Libya, Algeria, Bahrain and Morocco. While these countries have diverse histories, political institutions, and experiences with accountability, most have experienced non-transition, stalled transition, or political manipulation of transitional justice measures, highlighting the limits of such mechanisms. These studies should inform reflection not only on the role of transitional justice in the region, but also on challenges to its operation more generally.

Transitional Justice In The Middle East And North Africa

Author: Chandra Lekha Sriram
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780190686567
Size: 11.85 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 6429
Download and Read
The chapters in this volume, written largely by experts in the field, draw upon pre- and post-Arab Spring use of transitional justice mechanisms in a range of countries, including Algeria, Egypt, Tunisia, Yemen, Libya, Morocco, and Bahrain

Transitional Justice And The Arab Spring

Author: Kirsten J. Fisher
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135984816
Size: 13.62 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 7583
Download and Read
This book presents a varied and critical picture of how the Arab Spring demands a re-examination and re-conceptualization of issues of transitional justice. It demonstrates how unique features of this wave of revolutions and popular protests that have swept the Arab world since December 2010 give rise to distinctive concerns and problems relative to transitional justice. The contributors explore how these issues in turn add fresh perspective and nuance to the field more generally. In so doing, it explores fundamental questions of social justice, reconstruction and healing in the context of the Arab Spring. Including the perspectives of academics and practitioners, Transitional Justice and the Arab Spring will be of considerable interest to those working on the politics of the Middle East, normative political theory, transitional justice, international law, international relations and human rights.

Transitional Justice And Human Rights In Morocco

Author: Fadoua Loudiy
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317929578
Size: 72.82 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 6483
Download and Read
This book examines the Moroccan experience of transitional justice, more specifically the negotiation of the legacy of the period commonly referred to as the Years of Lead. This period of Moroccan history roughly spans from the early 1960s to 1999 during which thousands of citizens were arbitrarily detained, tortured and killed because of their political opinions. Through an analysis of testimonies, public documents and personal interviews, Transitional Justice and Human Rights in Morocco seeks to shed light on Moroccan citizens’ struggle for recognition and reparation in the aftermath of a long history of grave human rights violations, ranging from arbitrary arrest and torture to state sponsored disappearances and murders. While Morocco’s experience is often presented within a historical global context, this book offers a comparative analysis, discussing other national examples to situate the Moroccan experience within the relatively recent history of political transitions. Seeking to advance a rhetoric of symbolic justice that privileges the voice of the victims and offers hope for the renewal of a community’s ethos through public discourse and ethico-political practices, this book will be an invaluable resource for students and scholars with an interest in Human Rights and Middle East Politics.

Transitional Justice And The Prosecution Of Political Leaders In The Arab Region

Author: Noha Aboueldahab
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1509911340
Size: 40.37 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 3763
Download and Read
The dramatic uprisings that ousted the long-standing leaders of several countries in the Arab region set in motion an unprecedented period of social, political and legal transformation. The prosecution of political leaders took centre stage in the pursuit of transitional justice following the 'Arab Spring'. Through a comparative case study of Egypt, Libya, Tunisia and Yemen, this book argues that transitional justice in the Arab region presents the strongest challenge yet to the transitional justice paradigm. This paradigm is built on the underlying assumption that transitions constitute a shift from non-liberal to liberal democratic regimes, where often legal measures are taken to address atrocities committed during the prior regime. The book is guided by two principal questions: first, what trigger and driving factors led to the decision of whether or not to prosecute former political leaders? And second, what shaping factors affected the content and extent of decisions regarding prosecution? In answering these questions, the book enhances our understanding of how transitional justice is pursued by different actors in varied contexts. In doing so, it challenges the predominant understanding that transitional justice uniformly occurs in liberalising contexts and calls for a re-thinking of transitional justice theory and practice. Using original findings generated from almost 50 interviews across 4 countries, this research builds on the growing critical literature that claims that transitional justice is an under-theorised field and needs to be developed to take into account non-liberal and complex transitions. It will be stimulating and thought-provoking reading for all those interested in transitional justice and the 'Arab Spring'. 'Beginning with the striking image of former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak in the docks in 2011, Aboueldahab analyzes the role of transitional justice processes in relation to the political developments of the Arab Spring. She makes a compelling case for a fundamental rethinking of those approaches to fighting impunity that have become mainstreamed in the international human rights community; this book also challenges assumptions and theories regarding the notion of 'liberalizing' political transitions. Drawing from four country contexts (Egypt, Tunisia, Libya and Yemen) this book demonstrates that human rights goals were undermined because the international community and key national actors ignored the socio-legal histories that shaped the paths and horizons of political change. This book is an important contribution to the study of international criminal law, transitional justice, and the broader field of political transition.' Vasuki Nesiah, Associate Professor of Practice, New York University 'This very timely and perceptive study provides rigorous empirical evaluation of the post-transition prosecution strategies in the Arab region. It demonstrates both the complexity of and contrasts between the cases, but also highlights their divergence from the transitional justice field as it is generally understood. By exploring the broader political shifts and the local political dynamics of prosecutions, Noha Aboueldahab challenges common misconceptions about whose interests prosecutions serve in these contexts. In doing so, she questions the assumptions of transitional justice more broadly.' Hugo van der Merwe, Director of Research, The Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation and Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of Transitional Justice 'In this book Aboueldahab presents an in depth empirical analysis of the dynamics of transitional justice in the Arab spring. In so doing she highlights not only the practical difficulties faced but provides an insightful commentary on some of the core tensions of transitional justice itself. The book will be an invaluable resource for those seeking to understand the successes and failures of transitional justice and its application to non-liberal transitions.' Dr Catherine Turner, Assistant Professor, Durham Law School

Searching For Truth In The Transitional Justice Movement

Author: Jamie Rowen
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107108764
Size: 39.60 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 3116
Download and Read
Searching for Truth in the Transitional Justice Movement examines calls for a truth commission to redress the brutal war during the breakup of the former Yugoslavia, the decades-long armed conflict in Colombia, and US detention policies in the War on Terror. In so doing, it argues that transitional justice is an idea around which a loosely structured movement emerged and professionalized, making truth commissions a standard response to mass violence. By exploring how this movement developed, as well as efforts to make truth commissions in the Balkans, Colombia, and the US, this book explains different processes through which political actors translate new legal ideas such as transitional justice into political action. Further, it reveals how the malleability of transitional justice and truth commissions is both an asset and a liability for those hoping to ensure accountability, improve survivor well-being, and prevent future violence.

Advocating Transitional Justice In Africa

Author: Jasmina Brankovic
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3319704176
Size: 67.14 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 5429
Download and Read
This edited volume examines the role of local civil society in shaping understandings and processes of transitional justice in Africa – a nursery of transitional justice ideas for well over two decades. It brings together practitioners and scholars with intimate knowledge of these processes to evaluate the agendas and strategies of local civil society, and offers an opportunity to reflect on ‘lessons learnt’ along the way. The contributors focus on the evolution and effectiveness of transitional justice interventions, providing a glimpse into the motivations and inner workings of major civil society actors. The book presents an African perspective on transitional justice through a compilation of country-specific and thematic analyses of agenda setting and lobbying efforts. It offers insights into state–civil society relations on the continent, which shape these agendas. The chapters present case studies from Southern, Central, East, West and North Africa, and a range of moments and types of transition. In addition to historical perspective, the chapters provide fresh and up-to- date analyses of ongoing transitional justice efforts that are key to defining the future of how the field is understood globally, in theory and in practice Endorsements: "This great volume of written work – Advocating Transitional Justice in Africa: The Role of Civil Society – does what virtually no other labor of the intellect has done heretofore. Authored by movement activists and thinkers in the fields of human rights and transitional justice, the volume wrestles with the complex place and roles of transitional justice in the project of societal reconstruction in Africa. ... This volume will serve as a timely and thought-provoking guide for activists, thinkers, and policy makers – as well as students of transitional justice – interested in the tension between the universal and the particular in the arduous struggle for liberation. Often, civil society actors in Africa have been accused of consuming the ideas of others, but not producing enough, if any, of their own. This volume makes clear the spuriousness of this claim and firmly plants an African flag in the field of ideas." Makau Mutua