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Translating Cultures

Author: David Katan
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 9781900650731
Size: 65.58 MB
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As the 21st century gets into stride so does the call for a discipline combining culture and translation. This second edition of Translating Cultures retains its original aim of putting some rigour and coherence into these fashionable words and lays the foundation for such a discipline. This edition has not only been thoroughly revised, but it has also been expanded. In particular, a new chapter has been added which focuses specifically on training translators for translational and intercultural competencies. The core of the book provides a model for teaching culture to translators, interpreters and other mediators. It introduces the reader to current understanding about culture and aims to raise awareness of the fundamental role of culture in constructing, perceiving and translating reality. Culture is perceived throughout as a system for orienting experience, and a basic presupposition is that the organization of experience is not 'reality', but rather a simplified model and a 'distortion' which varies from culture to culture. Each culture acts as a frame within which external signs or 'reality' are interpreted. The approach is interdisciplinary, taking ideas from contemporary translation theory, anthropology, Bateson's logical typing and metamessage theories, Bandler and Grinder's NLP meta-model theory, and Hallidayan functional grammar. Authentic texts and translations are offered to illustrate the various strategies that a cultural mediator can adopt in order to make the different cultural frames he or she is mediating between more explicit.

Evaluation In Translation

Author: Jeremy Munday
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136305637
Size: 14.46 MB
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In this book, Jeremy Munday presents advances towards a general theory of evaluation in translator decision-making that will be of high importance to translator and interpreter training and to descriptive translation analysis. By ‘evaluation’ the author refers to how a translator’s subjective stance manifests itself linguistically in a text. In a world where translation and interpreting function as a prism through which opposing personal and political views enter a target culture, it is crucial to investigate how such views are processed and sometimes subjectively altered by the translator. To this end, the book focuses on the translation process (rather than the product) and strives to identify more precisely those points where the translator is most likely to express judgment or evaluation. The translations studied cover a range of languages (Arabic, Chinese, Dutch, French, German, Indonesian, Italian, Japanese, Russian, Spanish and American Sign Language) accompanied by English glosses to facilitate comprehension by readers. This is key reading for researchers and postgraduates studying translation theory within Translation and Interpreting Studies.

Method In Translation History

Author: Anthony Pym
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317640985
Size: 29.37 MB
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Starting from the critical notion that we should be asking questions of contemporary importance - and that 'importance' itself must be defined - Anthony Pym sets about undoing many of the currently dominant models of translation history, positing, among much else, that the object of this history should be translators as people, that researchers are subjectively involved in their object, that cultural systems are based on social will, that translators work in intercultural spaces, and that a model of cooperation through negotiation may be applied to the way translators (and researchers!) work between cultures. At the same time, the proposed methodology is eminently constructive, showing how many empirical techniques can be developed and applied: clear illustrations are given of corpus selection, working definitions, deceptive statistics, and the construction of networks and regimes, incorporating elaborate examples drawn from medieval and modernist fields, as well as finding space for notes on practical problems like funding research. Finding its focus in historical debates, this book cannot help but create contemporary debate: its arguments seek not only to revitalize the historical study of translation but also to develop the wider concerns of intercultural studies.

Mediating Emergencies And Conflicts

Author: Federico M. Federici
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137553510
Size: 35.93 MB
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Contributors to this volume discuss different types of emergencies and conflicts and how challenging these multilingual operational environments are for linguists. The growth in reach and number of international relief operations has exposed the limits of current research into these challenges. Evidence in disaster management studies suggests communication remains a major operational issue. This book calls for enhanced focus on the role of translators and interpreters in emergencies by discussing existing research and questions which have emerged from experience in the field. Contributions in this volume undeniably demonstrate the need for multidisciplinary studies in mediating multilingual emergencies. They consider emergencies in hospitals (Cox and Lázaro Gutiérrez), in disaster response (Dogan), in bespoke training to translators in fast-developing crises (O’Brien), and in planning responses in predictably dangerous habitats (Razumovskaya & Bartashova). The volume also illustrates scenarios in which discourse on language mediation shows bias by limiting political dialogues (Al Shehari), by conditioning news reporting (Skorokhod), and by enforcing stereotypical notions of linguists in wars (Gaunt).

The Routledge Handbook Of Interpreting

Author: Holly Mikkelson
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317595017
Size: 60.63 MB
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The Routledge Handbook of Interpreting provides a comprehensive survey of the field of interpreting for a global readership. The handbook includes an introduction and four sections with thirty one chapters by leading international contributors. The four sections cover: The history and evolution of the field The core areas of interpreting studies from conference interpreting to interpreting in conflict zones and voiceover Current issues and debates from ethics and the role of the interpreter to the impact of globalization A look to the future Suggestions for further reading are provided with every chapter. The Routledge Handbook of Interpreting is an essential reference for researchers and advanced students of interpreting.

Gender In Translation

Author: Sherry Simon
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134820852
Size: 29.61 MB
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Gender in Translation is a broad-ranging, imaginative and lively look at feminist issues surrounding translation studies. Students and teachers of translation studies, linguistics, gender studies and women's studies will find this unprecedented work invaluable and thought-provoking reading. Sherry Simon argues that translation of feminist texts - with a view to promoting feminist perspectives - is a cultural intervention, seeking to create new cultural meanings and bring about social change. She takes a close look at specific issues which include: the history of feminist theories of language and translation studies; linguistic issues, including a critical examination of the work of Luce Irigaray; a look at women translators through history, from the Renaissance to the twentieth century; feminist translations of the Bible; an analysis of the ways in which French feminist texts such as De Beauvoir's The Second Sex have been translated into English.

Translation And Society

Author: Sergey Tyulenev
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317687906
Size: 40.28 MB
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This essential new textbook guides readers through the social aspects and sociologically informed approaches to the study of translation. Sergey Tyulenev surveys implicitly and explicitly sociological approaches to the study of translation, drawing on the most important and influential works both within translation studies and in sociology, as well as recent developments in the field. In addition to the theoretical grounding provided, the book explains in detail the methodology of studying translation from a sociological point of view. Translation and Society discusses why translation should be studied sociologically, reinforces the foundation of the sociologically informed translation research already in existence in the field and outlines possible new directions for the future. Throughout the book there are many examples and case studies and each chapter includes thought-provoking discussion points, possible assignments, and suggestions for further reading. This is an invaluable textbook for undergraduate and postgraduate students of Translation Studies.

Cultural Studies Interdisciplinarity And Translation

Author: Stefan Herbrechter
Publisher: Rodopi
ISBN: 9789042008939
Size: 56.64 MB
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This volume claims that interdisciplinarity and translation constitute the two main 'challenges' for cultural studies today. These conceptual issues ('inter' and 'trans') express themselves within specific historical and 'cultural' contexts. Interdisciplinarity is linked with the ongoing process of the institutionalisation of cultural studies in national academies, but also increasingly internationally, comparatively and to a certain extent even globally (cf. cultural studies of 'global culture'). Translation concerns cultural studies both as an object or product and as a subject or producer of translation processes. Cultural studies is the result of translation, translates and is being translated. The essays in this volume therefore relate these various ongoing cultural, linguistic and institutional translation processes to political and ethical issues of internationalisation and globalisation. The contributions draw their originality and strength from strategically crossing, disciplinary and national boundaries. They deliberately ignore the question of what may be 'proper' (to) cultural studies, and instead problematise the notions of 'propriety' and 'belonging'. As a 'reading practice' cultural studies, in these pages, is performedthrough adaptations and combinations of theory and critical practice. The volume should be of interest to everyone concerned with cultural studies' role in promoting intellectual debate within an increasingly international and 'globalised' public sphere.

Kafka Translated

Author: Michelle Woods
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA
ISBN: 1441131957
Size: 79.80 MB
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Kafka Translated is the first book to look at the issue of translation and Kafka's work. What effect do the translations have on how we read Kafka? Are our interpretations of Kafka influenced by the translators' interpretations? In what ways has Kafka been 'translated' into Anglo-American culture by popular culture and by academics? Michelle Woods investigates issues central to the burgeoning field of translation studies: the notion of cultural untranslatability; the centrality of female translators in literary history; and the under-representation of the influence of the translator as interpreter of literary texts. She specifically focuses on the role of two of Kafka's first translators, Milena Jesenská and Willa Muir, as well as two contemporary translators, Mark Harman and Michael Hofmann, and how their work might allow us to reassess reading Kafka. From here Woods opens up the whole process of translation and re-examines accepted and prevailing interpretations of Kafka's work.

Culture In Translation

Author: Martin Thomas
Publisher: ANU E Press
ISBN: 1921313250
Size: 14.71 MB
Format: PDF
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R. H. Mathews (1841-1918) was an Australian-born surveyor and self-taught anthropologist. From 1893 until his death in 1918, he made it his mission to record all 'new and interesting facts' about Aboriginal Australia. Despite falling foul with some of the most powerful figures in British and Australian anthropology, Mathews published some 2200 pages of anthropological reportage in English, French and German. His legacy is an outstanding record of Aboriginal culture in the Federation period. This first edited collection of Mathews' writings represents the many facets of his research, ranging from kinship study to documentation of myth. It include eleven articles translated from French or German that until now have been unavailable in English. Introduced and edited by Martin Thomas, who compellingly analyses the anthropologist, his milieu, and the intrigues that were so costly to his reputation, CULTURE IN TRANSLATION is essential reading on the history of cross-cultural research.