Download understanding developmental language disorders from theory to practice in pdf or read understanding developmental language disorders from theory to practice in pdf online books in PDF, EPUB and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to get understanding developmental language disorders from theory to practice in pdf book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want.



Understanding Developmental Language Disorders

Author: Courtenay Frazier Norbury
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 1135419469
Size: 66.29 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 5761
Download and Read
Developmental language disorders (DLD) occur when a child fails to develop his or her native language often for no apparent reason. Delayed development of speech and/or language is one of the most common reasons for parents of preschool children to seek the advice of their family doctor. Although some children rapidly improve, others have more persistent language difficulties. These long-term deficits can adversely affect academic progress, social relationships and mental well-being. Although DLDs are common, we are still a long way from understanding what causes them and how best to intervene. Understanding Developmental Language Disorders summarises the recent research developments in genetics and neuroimaging studies, assessment techniques and treatment studies to provide an overview of all aspects of DLD. The book investigates the possible genetic and biological causes of the disorder, how best to assess children's language skills to identify when and where communication breakdown occurs, what the long-term outcomes are for children who grow up with DLD, overlaps between DLD and other childhood disorders such as dyslexia and autism and how best to treat children with the disorder. Each chapter is written by a leading authority in the field in a format accessible to researchers, clinicians and families alike. This book, with its focus on both theory and practice, will be invaluable to students and researchers of speech-language pathology, psychology, psychiatry, linguistics and education. It will also be of interest to practicing speech-language pathologists, clinical psychologists, psychiatrists, educational psychologists, and teachers and parents of children with developmental language disorders.

Understanding Developmental Language Disorders

Author: Courtenay Frazier Norbury
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 020388258X
Size: 62.47 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 2960
Download and Read
Developmental language disorders (DLD) occur when a child fails to develop his or her native language often for no apparent reason. Delayed development of speech and/or language is one of the most common reasons for parents of preschool children to seek the advice of their family doctor. Although some children rapidly improve, others have more persistent language difficulties. These long-term deficits can adversely affect academic progress, social relationships and mental well-being. Although DLDs are common, we are still a long way from understanding what causes them and how best to intervene. Understanding Developmental Language Disorders summarises the recent research developments in genetics and neuroimaging studies, assessment techniques and treatment studies to provide an overview of all aspects of DLD. The book investigates the possible genetic and biological causes of the disorder, how best to assess children's language skills to identify when and where communication breakdown occurs, what the long-term outcomes are for children who grow up with DLD, overlaps between DLD and other childhood disorders such as dyslexia and autism and how best to treat children with the disorder. Each chapter is written by a leading authority in the field in a format accessible to researchers, clinicians and families alike. This book, with its focus on both theory and practice, will be invaluable to students and researchers of speech-language pathology, psychology, psychiatry, linguistics and education. It will also be of interest to practicing speech-language pathologists, clinical psychologists, psychiatrists, educational psychologists, and teachers and parents of children with developmental language disorders.

Managing Children With Developmental Language Disorder

Author: James Law
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781138317246
Size: 20.85 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 5355
Download and Read
Although most children learn language relatively quickly, as many as ten percent of them are slow to start speaking and are said to have developmental language disorder (DLD). Children with DLD are managed by a variety of different professionals in different countries, are offered different services for different periods of time and are given a variety of different therapeutic treatments. To date, there has been no attempt to evaluate these different practices. Managing the child with developmental language disorder: Theory and practice across Europe and beyond does just this, reporting on the findings of a survey carried out as part of the work of Cost Action IS1406, a European research network. Law analyses the results of the survey, looking at how different services are delivered in different counties, at the cultural factors underpinning such services and the theoretical frameworks used to inform practice in different countries. Managing children with developmental language disorder also provides a snap shot of international practices in a set of 35 country specific "vignettes," providing a benchmark for future developments but also calling attention to the work of key practitioners and thinkers in each of the countries investigated. This book will be essential reading for practitioners working with children with language impairments, those commissioning services and policy in the field and students of speech and language therapy.

Assessing Multilingual Children

Author: Sharon Armon-Lotem
Publisher: Multilingual Matters
ISBN: 1783093145
Size: 52.98 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 432
Download and Read
Second language learners often produce language forms resembling those of children with Specific Language Impairment (SLI). At present, professionals working in language assessment and education have only limited diagnostic instruments to distinguish language impaired migrant children from those who will eventually catch up with their monolingual peers. This book presents a comprehensive set of tools for assessing the linguistic abilities of bilingual children. It aims to disentangle effects of bilingualism from those of SLI, making use of both models of bilingualism and models of language impairment. The book’s methods-oriented focus will make it an essential handbook for practitioners who look for measures which could be adapted to a variety of languages in diverse communities, as well as academic researchers.

The Routledge International Companion To Educational Psychology

Author: Andrew J. Holliman
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136675094
Size: 10.47 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 4850
Download and Read
The Routledge International Companion to Educational Psychology brings together expert practitioners, researchers, and teachers from five continents to produce a unique and global guide to the core topics in the field. Each chapter includes coverage of the key thinkers, topic areas, events, and ideas that have shaped the field, but also takes the reader beyond typical textbook material and into engagement with current issues, cutting-edge research and future directions in the field of educational psychology from an international perspective. With over 30 chapters, the volume is divided into four themed sections: ‘An introduction to educational psychology’, ‘How children learn and develop’, ‘Issues concerning the assessment of children’ and ‘Identifying and meeting the needs of children with learning difficulties’. Covering the key issues and fundamental strands of educational psychology The Routledge International Companion to Educational Psychology aims to provide the reader with knowledge of: educational psychology (history, child rights, and practice); factors which influence children’s learning and development; issues to do with assessment (a key aspect of educational psychology); special educational needs (identification and how to meet their needs); the key thinkers, events, and ideas that have shaped the field; the core topics across educational psychology in an accessible manner; cutting edge research including recent research evidence and theory; future directions in the field of educational psychology; educational psychology from an international perspective. The book is conceived for both student and researcher use, and considers the implications for educational psychology practice in all sections. It will be highly beneficial for both students and lecturers on Education Studies and Psychology undergraduate courses, as well as combined undergraduate degrees .

Developmental Assessment Of The School Aged Child With Developmental Disabilities

Author: M. S. Thambirajah
Publisher: Jessica Kingsley Publishers
ISBN: 9780857003256
Size: 78.23 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 2876
Download and Read
Children and adolescents with emotional and behavioural problems who are referred to mental health services for assessment often have undiagnosed mild learning disabilities, and this guide is written for clinicians involved in making such assessments. It provides full guidance on common developmental disorders and their assessment, focusing on mild to moderate disabilities in the school-aged child. It covers intellectual disabilities, dyslexia, dyscalculia (mathematical disability), autism spectrum disorders, speech and language impairment, developmental coordination disorder, and emotional and personality development. Each chapter includes an account of normal development, including developmental milestones, an overview of the disorder, and its clinical assessment. This important professional guide will be invaluable for all child health and mental health professionals and trainees, including paediatricians, psychiatrists, mental health workers, clinical psychologists and educational psychologists.

Bilingualism And Bilingual Deaf Education

Author: Marc Marschark
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199371830
Size: 59.63 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 5742
Download and Read
In Bilingualism and Bilingual Deaf Education, volume editors Marc Marschark, Gladys Tang, and Harry Knoors bring together diverse issues and evidence in two related domains: bilingualism among deaf learners - in sign language and the written/spoken vernacular - and bilingual deaf education. The volume examines each issue with regard to language acquisition, language functioning, social-emotional functioning, and academic outcomes. It considers bilingualism and bilingual deaf education within the contexts of mainstream education of deaf and hard-of-hearing students in regular schools, placement in special schools and programs for the deaf, and co-enrollment programs, which are designed to give deaf students the best of both educational worlds. The volume offers both literature reviews and new findings across disciplines from neuropsychology to child development and from linguistics to cognitive psychology. With a focus on evidence-based practice, contributors consider recent investigations into bilingualism and bilingual programming in different educational contexts and in different countries that may have different models of using spoken and signed languages as well as different cultural expectations. The 18 chapters establish shared understandings of what are meant by "bilingualism," "bilingual education," and "co-enrollment programming," examine their foundations and outcomes, and chart directions for future research in this multidisciplinary area. Chapters are divided into three sections: Linguistic, Cognitive, and Social Foundations; Education and Bilingual Education; and Co-Enrollment Settings. Chapters in each section pay particular attention to causal and outcome factors related to the acquisition and use of these two languages by deaf learners of different ages. The impact of bilingualism and bilingual deaf education in these domains is considered through quantitative and qualitative investigations, bringing into focus not only common educational, psychological, and linguistic variables, but also expectations and reactions of the stakeholders in bilingual programming: parents, teachers, schools, and the deaf and hearing students themselves.

Language Development From Theory To Practice

Author: Khara L. Pence
Publisher: Allyn & Bacon
ISBN: 9780137073474
Size: 78.32 MB
Format: PDF
View: 7168
Download and Read
A balanced and multidimensional survey of language development rich in learning tools and features. Language Development from Theory to Practice provides students with a user-friendly approach to key topics in language development, including research methods, theoretical perspectives, major language milestones from birth to adolescence, and language diversity and language disorders. The research based and theoretical foundation found in this engaging text is designed to prepare students for advanced study in subjects associated with language development by summarizing the various theoretical orientations that have guided research and practice. With an emphasis on the relevance of the material to students' current and future experiences in clinical, educational, and research settings, this text also focuses on individual differences in language development, including those of children who are developing language in diverse cultures or who are developing language atypically. Features � A balance of theory and practice provides students with a theoretical and scientific foundation to the study of language development and prepares them for advanced study in language development and related fields. � A multidisciplinary focus allows readers to best understand the constantly evolving and diverse world of language development study � Multicultural considerations in understanding language development promotes students' awareness of the way culture interacts with language development for children from diverse backgrounds within and beyond North American communities. � An emphasis on research familiarize students with the use of evidence-based practices as well as the most current empirical findings in children's language achievements. � A reader-friendly format and style promotes student learning with boldfaced terms, helpful figures and graphs, discussion questions, and an engaging writing style. � Learning tools and features, include focus questions, chapter summaries, resource lists, boxed inserts. � A companion website located at www.pearsonhighered.com/pence2e, offers students reflection questions, study items, and helpful website links to related sites of interest for further study. � A CD-ROM that contains language samples of children from birth through 13 years of age and video clips of research paradigms used to learn about language development gives students an opportunity to hear and visualize language development and language development concepts.

Language And Social Disadvantage

Author: Judy Clegg
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 0470029110
Size: 52.62 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 4720
Download and Read
Language and Social Disadvantage critically analyses and reviews the development of language in direct relation to social disadvantage in the early years and beyond. Definitions and descriptions of social disadvantage are addressed and wider aspects discussed. Theory and practice in relation to language development and social disadvantage are explored. The book is divided into two sections: the first addresses the theoretical associations and relationships between social disadvantage and language, where cognition, literacy, behaviour, learning, socio-emotional development, intervention and outcomes are considered in depth. The second section applies the theory to practice, where real-life intervention studies in nurseries, schools and other contexts are reported. Research and practice based in the UK is a focus of all the chapters and research reports. A genuinely interdisciplinary and collaborative approach is taken using perspectives from speech and language therapy, psychology and education. The book is ideal for professionals and students interested in the study of language development and intervention in the context of social disadvantage.

Language Development From Theory To Practice

Author: Khara L Pence Turnbull
Publisher: Pearson
ISBN: 0134170571
Size: 47.87 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 1853
Download and Read
Language Development From Theory to Practice provides a survey of key topics in language development, including research methods, theoretical perspectives, and major language milestones from birth to adolescence and beyond, and language diversity and language disorders. Each chapter bridges language development theory and practice by providing students with a theoretical and scientific foundation to the study of language development. The authors emphasize the relevance of the material to students’ current and future experiences in clinical, educational, and research settings; emphasize multicultural considerations and how they affect language development; focus on using evidence-based practices for making educational and clinical decisions; show the relevance of a multidisciplinary perspective on the theory and practice of language development; and include a number of outstanding pedagogical features to motivate and engage students. The new edition builds on the strengths of the earlier editions while featuring a chapter reorganization that promotes better understanding, more detailed coverage of topics of particular interest to students, expanded categorization of language-development theories, and a variety of helpful new pedagogical features.