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United By Faith

Author: Curtiss Paul DeYoung
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780195177527
Size: 42.62 MB
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Presents an argument for multiracial Christian congregations in breaking down racial barriers in the United States.

United By Faith

Author: Curtiss Paul DeYoung
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780198034728
Size: 38.89 MB
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In the last four decades, desegregation has revolutionized almost every aspect of life in the United States: schools, businesses, government offices, even entertainment. But there is one area that remains largely untouched, and that is the church. Now comes a major new call for multiracial congregations in every possible setting--a call that is surprisingly controversial, even in the twenty-first century. In United By Faith, a multiracial team of sociologists and a minister of the Church of God argue that multiracial Christian congregations offer a key to opening the still-locked door between the races in the United States. They note, however, that a belief persists--even in African-American and Latino churches--that racial segregation is an acceptable, even useful practice. The authors examine this question from biblical, historical, and theological perspectives to make their case. They explore the long history of interracialism in the church, with specific examples of multiracial congregations in the United States. They cite examples ranging from the abolitionist movement to an astonishing 1897 camp meeting in Alabama that brought together hundreds of whites and blacks literally into the same tent. Here, too, is a critical account of the theological arguments in favor of racial separation, as voiced in the African-American, Latino, Asian-American, Native-American, and white contexts. The authors respond in detail, closing with a foundation for a theology suited to sustaining multiracial congregations over time. Faith can be the basis for healing, but too often Christian faith has been a field for injury and division. In this important new book, readers will glimpse a way forward, a path toward once again making the church the basis for racial reconciliation in our still-splintered nation.

United By Faith

Author: Curtiss Paul DeYoung
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199882339
Size: 58.52 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 5293
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In the last four decades, desegregation has revolutionized almost every aspect of life in the United States: schools, businesses, government offices, even entertainment. But there is one area that remains largely untouched, and that is the church. Now comes a major new call for multiracial congregations in every possible setting--a call that is surprisingly controversial, even in the twenty-first century. In United By Faith, a multiracial team of sociologists and a minister of the Church of God argue that multiracial Christian congregations offer a key to opening the still-locked door between the races in the United States. They note, however, that a belief persists--even in African-American and Latino churches--that racial segregation is an acceptable, even useful practice. The authors examine this question from biblical, historical, and theological perspectives to make their case. They explore the long history of interracialism in the church, with specific examples of multiracial congregations in the United States. They cite examples ranging from the abolitionist movement to an astonishing 1897 camp meeting in Alabama that brought together hundreds of whites and blacks literally into the same tent. Here, too, is a critical account of the theological arguments in favor of racial separation, as voiced in the African-American, Latino, Asian-American, Native-American, and white contexts. The authors respond in detail, closing with a foundation for a theology suited to sustaining multiracial congregations over time. Faith can be the basis for healing, but too often Christian faith has been a field for injury and division. In this important new book, readers will glimpse a way forward, a path toward once again making the church the basis for racial reconciliation in our still-splintered nation.

Divided By Faith

Author: Michael O. Emerson
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780195147070
Size: 67.53 MB
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Based on a telephone survey of 2,000 people and 200 interviews, the authors study the grassroots of white evangelical America and learn that evangelicals themselves seem to hang on to the nation's racial divide and at this point in time real racial reconciliation remains unsolved by conservative Christians.

Faith Based Organizations At The United Nations

Author: Jeff Haynes
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137404515
Size: 70.91 MB
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The book examines selected faith-based organisations (FBOs) and their attempts to seek to influence debate and decision-making at the United Nations (UN). Increasing attention on FBOs in this context has followed what is widely understood as a widespread, post-Cold War "religious resurgence." The bibliography is available digitally at the end of sample chapter, which can be downloaded on this page.

Migrating Faith

Author: Daniel Ramírez
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469624079
Size: 11.47 MB
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Daniel Ramirez's history of twentieth-century Pentecostalism in the U.S.-Mexico borderlands begins in Los Angeles in 1906 with the eruption of the Azusa Street Revival. The Pentecostal phenomenon--characterized by ecstatic spiritual practices that included speaking in tongues, perceptions of miracles, interracial mingling, and new popular musical worship traditions from both sides of the border--was criticized by Christian theologians, secular media, and even governmental authorities for behaviors considered to be unorthodox and outrageous. Today, many scholars view the revival as having catalyzed the spread of Pentecostalism and consider the U.S.-Mexico borderlands as one of the most important fountainheads of a religious movement that has thrived not only in North America but worldwide. Ramirez argues that, because of the distance separating the transnational migratory circuits from domineering arbiters of religious and aesthetic orthodoxy in both the United States and Mexico, the region was fertile ground for the religious innovation by which working-class Pentecostals expanded and changed traditional options for practicing the faith. Giving special attention to individuals' and families' firsthand accounts and tracing how a vibrant religious music culture tied transnational communities together, Ramirez illuminates the interplay of migration, mobility, and musicality in Pentecostalism's global boom.

Not By Faith Alone

Author: Julie Adkins
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 0739146580
Size: 62.87 MB
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"Any person who wants to understand how faith-based organizations provide care for needy people in America must read this book. Based on a large set of case studies written by authors from various disciplines, Not by Faith A/one presents the full picture of how faith-based organizations act as a substitute for public care in America. The editors provide an insightful introduction that helps us understand the dynamics of local care by organizations of various faith traditions."ùRam A. Cnaan, University of Pennsylvania "Not by Faith Atone demonstrates that faith-based organizations (FBOs) play a major role in contemporary American life, from California to New England, from the Dakotas to the Texas border. The authors address a broad range of significant and controversial social and economic issuesùcommunity services, community development, education, homelessness assistance, refugee services, and drug addiction/rehabilitation programs. The volume's chapters emphasize an anthropological and ethnographic approach to FBOs while showing awareness of the contributions from other disciplines. Especially valuable is the editors' introduction, in which they offer an excellent history of 'faithful service' in America in light of several typologies for understanding the diversity of FBOs in the United States and abroad. This volume will be of great value to scholars and to practitioners and will serve as a landmark collection for appreciating the important role of faith-based organizations in American society."ùRobert V. Kemper, Southern Methodist University This edited collection provides an in-depth ethnographic study of faith-based development organizations in the United States, shining a much-needed critical light onto these organizations and their role by exploring the varied ways that faith-based organizations attempt to mend the fissures and mitigate the effects of neoliberal capitalism, poverty, and the social service sector on the poor and powerless. In doing so, Not by Faith A/one generates provocative and sophisticated analyses grounded in empirical case studies of such topics as the meaning of "faith-based" development, evaluations of faith-based versus secular approaches, the influence of faith orientation on program formulation and delivery, and examinations of faith-based organizations' impacts on structural inequality and poverty alleviation. Taken together, the chapters in this book demonstrate the vital importance of ethnography for understanding the particular role of faith-based agencies in development. The contributors demonstrate the importance of grounded analysis of the specific discourses, practices, and beliefs that imbue faith-based development with such power and reveal both the promise and the limitations of this particular vehicle of service delivery. Julie Adkins is adjunct lecturer in the Department of Anthropology and the Perkins School of Theology at Southern Methodist University. Laurie Occhipinti is associate professor in the Department of Anthropology, Geography, and Earth Sciences at Clarion University. Tara Herreran is visiting assistant professor in the Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Work at Central Michigan University.

Immigrant Faith

Author: Phillip Connor
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 1479865656
Size: 28.77 MB
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Immigrant Faith examines trends and patterns relating to religion in the lives of immigrants. The volume moves beyond specific studies of particular faiths in particular immigrant destinations to present the religious lives of immigrants in the United States, Canada, and Europe on a broad scale. Religion is not merely one aspect among many in immigrant lives. Immigrant faith affects daily interactions, shapes the future of immigrants in their destination society, and influences society beyond the immigrants themselves. In other words, to understand immigrants, one must understand their faith. Drawing on census data and other surveys, including data sources from several countries and statistical data from thousands of immigrant interviews, the volume provides a concise overview of immigrant religion. It sheds light on whether religion shapes the choice of destination for migrants, if immigrants are more or less religious after migrating, if religious immigrants have an easier adjustment, or if religious migrants tend to fare better or worse economically than non-religious migrants. Immigrant Faith covers demographic trends from initial migration to settlement to the transmission of faith to the second generation. It offers the perfect introduction to big picture patterns of immigrant religion for scholars and students, as well as religious leaders and policy makers.

The People S Zion

Author: Joel Cabrita
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674985761
Size: 12.42 MB
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In The People’s Zion, Joel Cabrita tells the transatlantic story of Southern Africa’s largest popular religious movement, Zionism. It began in Zion City, a utopian community established in 1900 just north of Chicago. The Zionist church, which promoted faith healing, drew tens of thousands of marginalized Americans from across racial and class divides. It also sent missionaries abroad, particularly to Southern Africa, where its uplifting spiritualism and pan-racialism resonated with urban working-class whites and blacks. Circulated throughout Southern Africa by Zion City’s missionaries and literature, Zionism thrived among white and black workers drawn to Johannesburg by the discovery of gold. As in Chicago, these early devotees of faith healing hoped for a color-blind society in which they could acquire equal status and purpose amid demoralizing social and economic circumstances. Defying segregation and later apartheid, black and white Zionists formed a uniquely cosmopolitan community that played a key role in remaking the racial politics of modern Southern Africa. Connecting cities, regions, and societies usually considered in isolation, Cabrita shows how Zionists on either side of the Atlantic used the democratic resources of evangelical Christianity to stake out a place of belonging within rapidly-changing societies. In doing so, they laid claim to nothing less than the Kingdom of God. Today, the number of American Zionists is small, but thousands of independent Zionist churches counting millions of members still dot the Southern African landscape.