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Urban Development

Author: Lewis D. Hopkins
Publisher: Island Press
ISBN: 9781559638531
Size: 73.32 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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With increased awareness of the role of plans in shaping urban and suburban landscapes has come increased criticism of planners and the planning profession. Developers, politicians, and citizens alike blame "poor planning" for a host of community ills. But what are plans really supposed to do? How do they work? What problems can they successfully address, and what is beyond their scope? In Urban Development, leading planning scholar Lewis Hopkins tackles these thorny issues as he explains the logic of plans for urban development and justifies prescriptions about when and how to make them. He explores the concepts behind plans, some that are widely accepted but seldom examined, and others that modify conventional wisdom about the use and usefulness of plans. The book: places the role of plans and planners within the complex system of urban development offers examples from the history of plans and planning discusses when plans should be made (and when they should not be made) gives a realistic idea of what can be expected from plans examines ways of gauging the success or failure of plansThe author supports his explanations with graphics, case examples, and hypothetical illustrations that enliven, clarify, and make concrete the discussions of how decisions about plans are and should be made.Urban Development will give all those involved with planning human settlements a more thorough understanding of why and how plans are made, enabling them to make better choices about using and making plans. It is an important contribution that will be essential for students and faculty in planning theory, land use planning, and planning project courses.

Principles Of Urban Retail Planning And Development

Author: Robert J. Gibbs
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 0470488220
Size: 53.97 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Downtown shopping areas are making a comeback. Economics and demographics have shifted in favour of smaller, smarter, more walkable, and more sustainable retail locations. However, these downtown areas still present numerous challenges as retail centres. This book offers urban planners, urban designers, and architects a comprehensive and current guide to meeting these challenges. With coverage ranging from psychographics to shopper behaviour to building design types, this resource lays out all the retail concepts and best practices needed to create, revitalize, and sustain urban shopping districts.--From back cover.

The Oxford Handbook Of Urban Planning

Author: Randall Crane
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190235268
Size: 79.84 MB
Format: PDF
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The Oxford Handbook of Urban Planning is an authoritative volume on planning, a long-established professional social science discipline in the U.S. and throughout the world. Edited by Rachel Weber and Randall Crane, professors at two leading planning institutes in the United States, this handbook collects together over 45 noted field experts to discuss three key questions: Why plan? How and what do we plan? Who plans for whom? These three questions are then applied across three major topics in planning: States, Markets, and the Provision of Social Goods; The Methods and Substance of Planning; and Agency, Implementation, and Decision Making. Covering the key components of the discipline, this book is a comprehensive, discipline-defining text suited for students and seasoned planners alike.

Fundamentals Of Plan Making

Author: Edward J. Jepson, Jr.
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317688538
Size: 68.14 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Urban and regional planning programs aspire to prepare practitioners to write and implement plans, primarily at the local level of government. These programs are very much "professional" in their aspirations, as opposed to research oriented. Yet, academic planning programs often place greater emphasis on theory than practice. For decades, the planning academy has acknowledged a major disconnect between what the planning academy teaches students and the techniques and skills needed to be a successful professional practitioner. Fundamentals of Plan Making will give planning students an understanding of research design as it applies to planning, develop familiarity with various data sources, and help them acquire knowledge and the ability to conduct basic planning analyses such as population projections, housing needs assessments, development impact analyses, and land use plans. Students will also learn how to implement the various citizen participation methods used by planners and develop an appreciation of the values and roles of practicing planners. In Fundamentals of Plan Making, Edward Jepson and Jerry Weitz bring their extensive experience as practicing academics and give planning students the practical, hands on tools they need to implement the various methods used to create and implement real plans and policies. Its chapters on transportation, housing, environment, economic development and other core development topics also make it a handy reference for planning practitioners. For errata to the first printing, please use the following link: www.routledge.com/9781138024366

Urban Planning For Disaster Recovery

Author: Alan March
Publisher: Butterworth-Heinemann
ISBN: 0128043237
Size: 77.68 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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Urban Planning for Disaster Recovery focuses on disaster recovery from the perspective of urban planning, an underutilized tactic that can significantly reduce disaster risks. The book examines disaster risk reduction (DRR), in particular, the recovery stage of what is widely known as the disaster cycle. The theoretical underpinning of the book derives from a number of sources in urban planning and disaster management literature, and is illustrated by a series of case studies. It consists of five sections, each of which opens with a conceptual framework that is followed by a series of supporting and illustrative cases as practical examples. These examples both complement and critique the theoretical base provided, demonstrating the need to apply the concepts in location-specific ways. Examines disaster recovery from an urban planning perspective Illustrates key concepts with real-world case studies Explores the contributions of experts, urban planners, NGOs, and community members

The Robust City

Author: Tony Hall
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317625846
Size: 65.69 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Cities expand, upwards and outwards, and their physical structure can last a very long time, not just tens but hundreds of years. Nevertheless, they are rarely designed for expansion. Their layout does not allow for extension or for the retrofitting of infrastructure and can constrain, and often prevent, the growth and change of activities within them - cities are not 'robust' in their design. In other words, change is not planned for but involves costly reconstruction. The Robust City argues that a robust, expandable and sustainable urban form can be deduced from planning goals. Development should not just follow public transport corridors but should not be allowed beyond walking distance from them. This would create 'green enclaves' that would permit not only recreational access but also the retrofitting of infrastructure and the efficient circulation of motor vehicles. The same principles could also be applied within neighbourhoods and to facilitate the rational handling of urban intensification.

Shaping Suburbia

Author: Paul G. Lewis
Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Pre
ISBN: 9780822971733
Size: 43.47 MB
Format: PDF
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The American metropolis has been transformed over the past quarter century. Cities have turned inside out, with rapidly growing suburbs evolving into edge cities and technoburbs. But not all suburbs are alike. In Shaping Suburbia, Paul Lewis argues that a fundamental political logic underlies the patterns of suburban growth and states that the key to understanding suburbia is to understand the local governments that control it - their number, functions, and power. Using innovative models and data analyses, Lewis shows that the relative political fragmentation of a metropolitan area plays a key part in shaping its suburbs.

Urban Complexity And Planning

Author: Professor Haoying Han
Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
ISBN: 1409474593
Size: 41.14 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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In recent years, there has been a new understanding of how cities evolve and function, which reflects the emergent paradigm of complexity. The crux of this view is that cities are created by differentiated actors involved in individual, small-scale projects interacting in a complex way in the urban development process. This 'bottom up' approach to urban modeling not only transforms our understanding of cities, but also improves our capabilities of harnessing the urban development process. For example, we used to think that plans control urban development in an aggregate, holistic way, but what actually happens is that plans only affect differentiated actors in seeking their goals through information. In other words, plans and regulations set restrictions or incentives of individual behaviour in the urban development process through imposing rights, information, and prices, and the analysis of the effects of plans and regulations must take into account the complex urban dynamics at a disaggregate level of the urban development process. Computer simulations provide a rigorous, promising analytic tool that serves as a supplement to the traditional, mathematical approach to depicting complex urban dynamics. Based on the emergent paradigm of complexity, the book provides an innovative set of arguments about how we can gain a better understanding of how cities emerge and function through computer simulations, and how plans affect the evolution of complex urban systems in a way distinct from what we used to think they should. Empirical case studies focus on the development of a compact urban hierarchy in Taiwan, China, and the USA, but derive more generalizable principles and relationships among cities, complexity, and planning.

Spatial Planning And Urban Development

Author: Pier Carlo Palermo
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9789048188703
Size: 24.32 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Urban planning is a complex field of knowledge and practice. Through the decades, theoretical debate has formed an eclectic set of possible perspectives, without finding, in our opinion, a coherent paradigmatic framework which can adequately guide the interpretation and action in urban planning. The hypothesis of this book is that the attempts of founding an autonomous planning theory are inadequate if they do not explore two interconnected fields: architecture and public policies.The book critically reviews a selected set of current practices and theoretical founding works of modern and contemporary urban planning by highlighting the continuous search for the epistemic legitimization of a large variety of experiences. The distinctive contribution of this book is a documented critique to the eclecticism and abstraction of the main international trends in current planning theory. The dialogic relationship with the traditions of architecture and public policy is proposed here in order to critically review planning theory and practice. The outcome is the proposal of a paradigmatic framework that, in the authors’ opinion, can adequately guide reflections and actions. A pragmatic and interpretative heritage and the project-orientated approach are the basis of this new spatial planning paradigm.