Download us mexico borderlands historical and contemporary perspectives jaguar books on latin america in pdf or read us mexico borderlands historical and contemporary perspectives jaguar books on latin america in pdf online books in PDF, EPUB and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to get us mexico borderlands historical and contemporary perspectives jaguar books on latin america in pdf book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want.



U S Mexico Borderlands

Author: Oscar Jáquez Martínez
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9780842024471
Size: 32.67 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 6544
Download and Read
"Excellent collection of scholarly essays and primary documents. Covers 1830s-1990s, with the emphasis on the post-1910 era. Work is divided into seven sections, each covering a key issue in borderlands history. Good introduction to each entry"--Handbookof Latin American Studies, v. 58.

Redeeming La Raza

Author: Gabriela González
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199914141
Size: 59.19 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 5682
Download and Read
"Redeeming La Raza examines the gendered and class-conscious political activism of Mexican-origin people in Texas from 1900 to 1950. In particular, it questions the inter-generational agency of Mexicans and Mexican Americans who subscribed to particular race-ethnic, class, and gender ideologies as they encountered barriers and obstacles in a society that often treated Mexicans as a nonwhite minority. Middle-class transborder activists sought to redeem the Mexican masses from body politic exclusions in part by encouraging them to become identified with the nation-state. Redeeming La Raza was as much about saving them from traditional modes of thought and practices that were perceived as hindrances to progress as it was about saving them from race and class-based forms of discrimination that were part and parcel of modernity. At the center of this link between modernity and discriminatory practices based on social constructions lay the economic imperative for the abundant and inexpensive labor power that the modernization process required. Labeling groups of people as inferior helped to rationalize their economic exploitation in a developing modern nation-state that also professed to be a democratic society founded upon principles of political egalitarianism. This book presents cases of transborder activism that demonstrate how the politics of respectability and the politics of radicalism operated, often at odds but sometimes in complementary ways."--Provided by publisher.

Latin America During World War Ii

Author: Thomas M. Leonard
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9780742537415
Size: 46.75 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 942
Download and Read
The first full-length study of World War II from the Latin American perspective, this unique volume offers an in-depth analysis of the region during wartime. Each country responded to World War II according to its own national interests, which often conflicted with those of the Allies, including the United States. The contributors systematically consider how each country dealt with commonly shared problems - the Axis threat to the national order, the extent of military cooperation with the Allies, and the war's impact on the national economy and domestic political and social structures. Drawing on both U.S. and Latin American primary sources, the book offers a rigorous comparison of the wartime experiences of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Central America, Gran Colombia, the Dominican Republic, Mexico, Panama, and Puerto Rico.

Work Protest And Identity In Twentieth Century Latin America

Author: Vincent C. Peloso
Publisher: Scholarly Resources Inc
ISBN:
Size: 46.86 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 2806
Download and Read
This text illustrates how work, an activity at the center of individual's lives across society in Latin America, has affected people and in turn been affected by other facets of daily existence. This novel approach to labor-rather than the labor movement, labor unions, and labor organizing-sets work in the context of social history in Latin America. Work, Protest, and Identity in Twentieth-Century Latin America combines a chronological approach with a topical one to clarify how work is related to other themes in daily Latin American life-themes such as gender, race, family life, ethnicity, immigration, politics, industrial and agricultural growth, and religion. Relations between workers and other sectors of urban society, especially the 'middle class' elements most closely associated with labor-shopkeepers, petty merchants, clerks, and secretaries-are featured prominently. This text demonstrates how women, who are an increasingly significant part of the work force in twentieth century Latin America, often guide the formation of issues that govern work problems throughout the popular sectors of society. The essays in this collection bring together original studies and published works that illustrate the tensions and conflicts between work, identity, and community in twentieth century Latin America that caused protest to take many different forms in Latin American countries, including Cuba, Brazil, Mexico, Argentina, Uruguay, Colombia, Peru, Ecuador, and Chile. This volume illustrates situations when work and identity combined to produce expressions of protest that struck a chord in the broader population and in doing so revealed the importance of identity issues. Designed to give students a better appreciation for the complexity of the lives of the wage-working sectors of society and the richness of their contributions to the cultures and nations of the region, Work, Protest, and Identity in Twentieth-Century Latin America is essential for courses on the social history of Latin America, state formation, labor and protest, and surveys of modern Latin America.