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Viewing And Imaging The Solar System

Author: Jane Clark
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1461451795
Size: 12.93 MB
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Viewing and Imaging the Solar System: A Guide for Amateur Astronomers is for those who want to develop their ability to observe and image Solar System objects, including the planets and moons, the Sun, and comets and asteroids. They might be beginners, or they may have already owned and used an astronomical telescope for a year or more. Newcomers are almost always wowed by sights such as the rings of Saturn and the moons of Jupiter, but have little idea how to find these objects for themselves (with the obvious exceptions of the Sun and Moon). They also need guidance about what equipment, besides a telescope, they will need. This book is written by an expert on the Solar System, who has had a lot of experience with outreach programs, which teach others how to make the most of relatively simple and low-cost equipment. That does not mean that this book is not for serious amateurs. On the contrary, it is designed to show amateur astronomers, in a relatively light-hearted—and math-free way—how to become serious.

Sketching The Moon

Author: Richard Handy
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9781461409410
Size: 74.40 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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For anyone artistically inclined, observing the Moon and attempting to sketch or paint it can easily become a passion. The Moon presents a broad array of tone, texture, and form. Capturing this in a painting or sketch at the eyepiece of a telescope – or even with binoculars – develops observational skills, leaves a record of the observation, and can also be a delightful and rewarding pastime. However, the choice of media available is extensive (acrylic paint, oils, pen, charcoal, etc., and even computer art programs), and there is no existing text that fully explains all lunar sketching and painting techniques in each respective medium. This beautiful and graphically rich book fulfills this requirement. It presents detailed step-by-step instructions, in the form of illustrated tutorials for every major medium employed to represent the Moon. It also provides practical advice on how to sketch outdoors at night (not ideal conditions for an artist!). This is easily the most extensive book on the subject of lunar art for amateur astronomers, particularly those observing through a telescope. The diverse features of the lunar surface will attract and entice readers to review the number of different media presented, exciting and inspiring them with the possibilities of learning to depict all of the fascinating aspects of Earth's very own satellite.

The Mythology Of The Night Sky

Author: David E. Falkner
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9781461401377
Size: 26.85 MB
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The Mythology of the Night Sky is intended primarily for amateur astronomers who would like to know the mythology behind the names of constellations and planets. It deals with the 48 constellations identified by the ancient Greek astronomer Ptolemy, as well as all the planets of our solar system and their moons, which are named after Roman gods. To assist practical observers the book gives the location and description of each constellation, including named stars and deep-sky objects. Readers are encouraged to observe and image the constellations for themselves, and there is a lot of practical information in this book to help them along the way. In addition to providing a detailed (and mostly Greek) mythology of the constellations and the vast soap opera that was part of the Ancient Greek pantheon, this book also addresses the planets of the Solar System, which are named after the Roman - not Greek - gods.

Getting Started In Radio Astronomy

Author: Steven Arnold
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1461481570
Size: 60.64 MB
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Radio astronomy is a mystery to the majority of amateur astronomers, yet it is the best subject to turn to when desirous of an expanded knowledge of the sky. This guide intends to instruct complete newcomers to radio astronomy, and provides help for the first steps on the road towards the study of this fascinating subject. In addition to a history of the science behind the pursuit, directions are included for four easy-to-build projects, based around long-term NASA and Stanford Solar Center projects. The first three projects constitute self-contained units available as kits, so there is no need to hunt around for parts. The fourth – more advanced – project encourages readers to do their own research and track down items. Getting Started in Radio Astronomy provides an overall introduction to listening in on the radio spectrum. With details of equipment that really works, a list of suppliers, lists of online help forums, and written by someone who has actually built and operated the tools described, this book contains everything the newcomer to radio astronomy needs to get going.

Phillip S Astronomy Encyclopedia A Comprehensive And Authoritative A Z Guide To The Universe Sir Patrick Moore 2002

Author: Octopus Publishing Group
Publisher: Bukupedia
ISBN:
Size: 46.61 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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‘Mc’ is treated as if it were spelled ‘Mac’, and certain shortened forms as if spelled out in full (e.g. ‘St’ is treated as ‘Saint’). Entries that have more than one word in the heading are alphabetized as if there were no space between the words. Entries that share the same main heading are in the order of people, places and things. Entries beginning with numerals are treated as if the numerals were spelled out (e.g. 3C follows three-body problem and precedes 3C 273). An exception is made for HI region and HII region, which appear together immediately after Hirayama family. Biographies are alphabetized by surname, with first names following the comma. (Forenames are placed in parentheses if the one by which a person is commonly known is not the first.) Certain lunar and planetary features appear under the main element of names (e.g. Imbrium, Mare rather than Mare Imbrium). Cross-references SMALL CAPITALS in an article indicate a separate entry that defines and explains the word or subject capitalized. ‘See also’ at the end of an article directs the reader to entries that contain additional relevant information. Measurements Measurements are given in metric (usually SI) units, with an imperial conversion (to an appropriate accuracy) following in parentheses where appropriate. In historical contexts this convention is reversed so that, for example, the diameter of an early telescope is given first in inches. Densities, given in grams per cubic centimetre, are not converted, and neither are kilograms or tonnes. Large astronomical distances are usually given in light-years, but parsecs are sometimes used in a cosmological context. Particularly in tables, large numbers may be given in exponential form. Thus 103 is a thousand, 2 106 is two million, and so on. ‘Billion’ always means a thousand million, or 109. As is customary in astronomy, dates are expressed in the order year, month, day. Details of units of measurement, conversion factors and the principal abbreviations used in the book will be found in the tables on this page. Stellar data In almost all cases, data for stars are taken from the HIPPARCOS CATALOGUE. The very few exceptions are for instances where the catalogue contains an error of which the editors have been aware. In tables of constellations and elsewhere, the combined magnitude is given for double stars, and the average magnitude for variable stars. Star Maps pages 447–55 Acknowledgements page 456 FRONTMATTER IMAGES Endpapers: Andromeda Galaxy The largest member of the Local Group, this galaxy is the farthest object that can be seen with the naked eye. Half-title: Crab Nebula This nebula is a remnant of a supernova that exploded in the constellation of Taurus in 1054. Opposite title: M83 Blue young stars and red HII emission nebulae clearly mark out regions of star formation in this face-on spiral galaxy in Hydra. Opposite Foreword: NGC 4945 This classic disk galaxy is at a distance of 13 million l.y. Its stars are mainly confined to a flat, thin, circular region surrounding the nucleus. Opposite page 1: Earth This photograph was obtained by the Apollo 17 crew en route to the Moon in 1972 December. SYMBOLS FOR UNITS, CONSTANTS AND QUANTITIES a semimajor axis Å angstrom unit AU astronomical unit c speed of light d distance e eccentricity E energy eV electron-volt f following F focal length, force g acceleration due to gravity G gauss G gravitational constant h hour h Planck constant Ho Hubble constant Hz hertz i inclination IC Index Catalogue Jy jansky k Boltzmann constant K degrees kelvin L luminosity Ln Lagrangian points (n = 1 to 5) l.y. light-year m metre, minute m apparent magnitude, mass mbol bolometric magnitude mpg photographic magnitude mpv photovisual magnitude mv visual magnitude M absolute magnitude, mass (stellar) N newton p preceding P orbital period pc parsec q perihelion distance qo deceleration parameter Q aphelion distance r radius, distance R Roche limit s second t time T temperature (absolute), epoch (time of perihelion passage) Teff effective temperature v velocity W watt y year z redshift α constant of aberration, right ascension δ declination λ wavelength μ proper motion ν frequency π parallax ω longitude of perihelion Ω observed/critical density ratio, longitude of ascending node ° degree [1] arcminute arcsecond Distances 1 nm = 10 Å 1 inch = 25.4 mm 1 mm = 0.03937 inch 1ft = 0.3048 m 1 m = 39.37 inches = 3.2808 ft 1 mile = 1.6093 km 1 km = 0.6214 mile 1 km/s = 2237 mile/h 1 pc = 3.0857 × 1013 km = 3.2616 l.y. = 206,265 AU 1 l.y. = 9.4607 × 1012 km = 0.3066 pc = 63,240 AU Temperatures (to the nearest degree) °C to °F : 1.8, 32 °C to K : 273 °F to °C : 32, 1.8 °F to K : 1.8, 255 K to °C : 273 K to °F : 1.8, 460 Note: To convert temperature differences, rather than points on the temperature scale, ignore the additive or subtractive figure and just multiply or divide.

Video Astronomy On The Go

Author: Joseph Ashley
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3319469371
Size: 49.26 MB
Format: PDF
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Author Joseph Ashley explains video astronomy's many benefits in this comprehensive reference guide for amateurs. Video astronomy offers a wonderful way to see objects in far greater detail than is possible through an eyepiece, and the ability to use the modern, entry-level video camera to image deep space objects is a wonderful development for urban astronomers in particular, as it helps sidestep the issue of light pollution. The author addresses both the positive attributes of these cameras for deep space imaging as well as the limitations, such as amp glow. The equipment needed for imaging as well as how it is configured is identified with hook-up diagrams and photographs. Imaging techniques are discussed together with image processing (stacking and image enhancement). Video astronomy has evolved to offer great results and great ease of use, and both novices and more experienced amateurs can use this book to find the set-up that works best for them. Flexible and portable, they open up a whole new way of seeing space.

From Casual Stargazer To Amateur Astronomer

Author: Dave Eagle
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1461487668
Size: 43.84 MB
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The beginning astronomical observer passes through a series of stages. The initial stage is hugely exciting and gives the beginner a real buzz as he discovers some of the faint fuzzy objects, markings on the planets, rings around Saturn and the craters on the Moon. But as the novice observer progresses, he or she wants to know what more there is than looking at faint fuzzy blobs or indistinct planet markings. Many jump to the conclusion – wrongly – that they need to spend lots of money on expensive equipment to progress. “From Casual Stargazer to Amateur Astronomer” has been written specifically to address this group of budding stargazers. Astronomy is much more than a quick sightseeing tour. Patient observers who can develop their skills will start to appreciate what they are seeing, and will know exactly what to look out for on any particular night. And equally important, they will learn what not to expect to see. “From Casual Stargazer to Amateur Astronomer” is for those who want to develop observing skills beyond mere sightseeing, and learn some of the techniques used to carry out enjoyable – and scientifically useful – observations. It will also direct readers to make informed choices about what can be seen and when. This book is for anyone keen to develop their skills as an amateur astronomer.

Grab N Go Astronomy

Author: Neil English
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 149390826X
Size: 27.74 MB
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Like everyone else, most amateur astronomers live busy lives. After a long day or work or looking after young children, the last thing you want as an observer is to have to lug out a large telescope and spend an hour getting it ready before it can be used. Maybe you are going on vacation somewhere in the countryside where there are sure to be dark skies, but you don’t necessarily want astronomy to dominate the trip. Or suppose you are not quite committed to owning a large telescope, but curious enough to see what a smaller, portable setup can accomplish. These are times when a small “grab ’n’ go” telescope, or even a pair of binoculars, is the ideal instrument. And this book can guide you in choosing and best utilizing that equipment. What makes a telescope fall into the “grab ’n’ go” category? That’s easy – speed of setting up, ease of use, and above all, portability. In Part I of this book, we survey the various types of equipment, including accessories and mounts, that are available, and what it is best for what kind of viewing. Part II is about using your grab ’n’ go telescope to visit a wealth and wide variety of objects. There are chapters on solar, lunar and planetary observing, as well as descriptions of many deep sky objects, including double and variable stars, planetary, emission and reflection nebulae, open and globular clusters and distant galaxies. This ambitious text is dedicated to those who love to or – because of their limited time – must observe the sky at a moment’s notice, whether from the comfort of a backyard or while on business or vacation far from home. Everything you need to know is here. So get started!.

The Observer S Guide To Planetary Motion

Author: Dominic Ford
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1493906291
Size: 42.90 MB
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To the naked eye, the most evident defining feature of the planets is their motion across the night sky. It was this motion that allowed ancient civilizations to single them out as different from fixed stars. “The Observer’s Guide to Planetary Motion” takes each planet and its moons (if it has them) in turn and describes how the geometry of the Solar System gives rise to its observed motions. Although the motions of the planets may be described as simple elliptical orbits around the Sun, we have to observe them from a particular vantage point: the Earth, which spins daily on its axis and circles around the Sun each year. The motions of the planets as observed relative to this spinning observatory take on more complicated patterns. Periodically, objects become prominent in the night sky for a few weeks or months, while at other times they pass too close to the Sun to be observed. “The Observer’s Guide to Planetary Motion” provides accurate tables of the best time for observing each planet, together with other notable events in their orbits, helping amateur astronomers plan when and what to observe. Uniquely each of the chapters includes extensive explanatory text, relating the events listed to the physical geometry of the Solar System. Along the way, many questions are answered: Why does Mars take over two years between apparitions (the times when it is visible from Earth) in the night sky, while Uranus and Neptune take almost exactly a year? Why do planets appear higher in the night sky when they’re visible in the winter months? Why do Saturn’s rings appear to open and close every 15 years? This book places seemingly disparate astronomical events into an understandable three-dimensional structure, enabling an appreciation that, for example, very good apparitions of Mars come around roughly every 15 years and that those in 2018 and 2035 will be nearly as good as that seen in 2003. Events are listed for the time period 2010-2030 and in the case of rarer events (such as eclipses and apparitions of Mars) even longer time periods are covered. A short closing chapter describes the seasonal appearance of deep sky objects, which follow an annual cycle as a result of Earth’s orbital motion around the Sun.

Lunar And Planetary Webcam User S Guide

Author: Martin Mobberley
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1846281997
Size: 11.91 MB
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This book de-mystifies the jargon of webcams and computer processing, and provides detailed hints and tips for imaging the Sun, Moon and planets with a webcam. It demonstrates how inexpensive tools are revolutionizing imaging in amateur astronomy. Anyone with a modest telescope and a webcam can now obtain jaw-dropping lunar and planetary images to rival those taken with mid-range astronomical CCD cameras costing thousands of dollars. A glance through the images in this book shows just what spectacular results can be achieved by using a webcam with your telescope! Your scientific results will be sought by professional astronomers.