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Virginia Hasn T Always Been For Lovers

Author: Phyl Newbeck
Publisher: SIU Press
ISBN: 9780809328574
Size: 70.73 MB
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Explores the history of the laws banning interracial marriage in the United States, discussing how they came about, how they were perpetuated, and how they were struck down, with an emphasis on the case of Richard and Mildred Loving, a couple convicted for the crime of marrying across racial lines by the state of Virginia in the late 1950s.

Loving V Virginia

Author: Susan Dudley Gold
Publisher: Marshall Cavendish
ISBN: 9780761425861
Size: 59.45 MB
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Details the Supreme Court case that challenged laws agains miscegenation and discusses the result of the case and its legacy.

Feminist Judgments

Author: Kathryn M. Stanchi
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107126622
Size: 37.40 MB
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Fifty feminist law professors come together to rewrite twenty-five major Supreme Court opinions on gender justice and equality.

Inside The Castle

Author: Joanna L. Grossman
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9781400839773
Size: 14.96 MB
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Inside the Castle is a comprehensive social history of twentieth-century family law in the United States. Joanna Grossman and Lawrence Friedman show how vast, oceanic changes in society have reshaped and reconstituted the American family. Women and children have gained rights and powers, and novel forms of family life have emerged. The family has more or less dissolved into a collection of independent individuals with their own wants, desires, and goals. Modern family law, as always, reflects the brute social and cultural facts of family life. The story of family law in the twentieth century is complex. This was the century that said goodbye to common-law marriage and breach-of-promise lawsuits. This was the century, too, of the sexual revolution and women's liberation, of gay rights and cohabitation. Marriage lost its powerful monopoly over legitimate sexual behavior. Couples who lived together without marriage now had certain rights. Gay marriage became legal in a handful of jurisdictions. By the end of the century, no state still prohibited same-sex behavior. Children in many states could legally have two mothers or two fathers. No-fault divorce became cheap and easy. And illegitimacy lost most of its social and legal stigma. These changes were not smooth or linear--all met with resistance and provoked a certain amount of backlash. Families took many forms, some of them new and different, and though buffeted by the winds of change, the family persisted as a central institution in society. Inside the Castle tells the story of that institution, exploring the ways in which law tried to penetrate and control this most mysterious realm of personal life.

Culture Wars

Author: Roger Chapman
Publisher: M.E. Sharpe
ISBN: 0765622505
Size: 31.89 MB
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A collection of letters from a cross-section of Japanese citizens to a leading Japanese newspaper, relating their experiences and thoughts of the Pacific War.

Almighty God Created The Races

Author: Fay Botham
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807899229
Size: 69.81 MB
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In this fascinating cultural history of interracial marriage and its legal regulation in the United States, Fay Botham argues that religion--specifically, Protestant and Catholic beliefs about marriage and race--had a significant effect on legal decisions concerning miscegenation and marriage in the century following the Civil War. She contends that the white southern Protestant notion that God "dispersed" the races and the American Catholic emphasis on human unity and common origins point to ways that religion influenced the course of litigation and illuminate the religious bases for Christian racist and antiracist movements.

The United States Of The United Races

Author: Greg Carter
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 081477251X
Size: 21.69 MB
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Barack Obama’s historic presidency has re-inserted mixed race into the national conversation. While the troubled and pejorative history of racial amalgamation throughout U.S. history is a familiar story, The United States of the United Races reconsiders an understudied optimist tradition, one which has praised mixture as a means to create a new people, bring equality to all, and fulfill an American destiny. In this genealogy, Greg Carter re-envisions racial mixture as a vehicle for pride and a way for citizens to examine mixed America as a better America. Tracing the centuries-long conversation that began with Hector St. John de Crevecoeur’s Letters of an American Farmer in the 1780s through to the Mulitracial Movement of the 1990s and the debates surrounding racial categories on the U.S. Census in the twenty-first century, Greg Carter explores a broad range of documents and moments, unearthing a new narrative that locates hope in racial mixture. Carter traces the reception of the concept as it has evolved over the years, from and decade to decade and century to century, wherein even minor changes in individual attitudes have paved the way for major changes in public response. The United States of the United Races sweeps away an ugly element of U.S. history, replacing it with a new understanding of race in America.

The New Encyclopedia Of Southern Culture

Author: Nancy Bercaw
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469616726
Size: 59.45 MB
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This volume of The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture reflects the dramatic increase in research on the topic of gender over the past thirty years, revealing that even the most familiar subjects take on new significance when viewed through the lens of gender. The wide range of entries explores how people have experienced, understood, and used concepts of womanhood and manhood in all sorts of obvious and subtle ways. The volume features 113 articles, 65 of which are entirely new for this edition. Thematic articles address subjects such as sexuality, respectability, and paternalism and investigate the role of gender in broader subjects, including the civil rights movement, country music, and sports. Topical entries highlight individuals such as Oprah Winfrey, the Grimke sisters, and Dale Earnhardt, as well as historical events such as the capture of Jefferson Davis in a woman's dress, the Supreme Court's decision in Loving v. Virginia, and the Memphis sanitation workers' strike, with its slogan, "I AM A MAN." Bringing together scholarship on gender and the body, sexuality, labor, race, and politics, this volume offers new ways to view big questions in southern history and culture.

Symposium

Author: Fordham University. School of Law
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 57.81 MB
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