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What Psychiatry Left Out Of The Dsm 5

Author: Edward Shorter
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317568729
Size: 77.85 MB
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What Psychiatry Left Out of the DSM-5: Historical Mental Disorders Today covers the diagnoses that the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) failed to include, along with diagnoses that should not have been included, but were. Psychiatry as a field is over two centuries old and over that time has gathered great wisdom about mental illnesses. Today, much of that knowledge has been ignored and we have diagnoses such as "schizophrenia" and "bipolar disorder" that do not correspond to the diseases found in nature; we have also left out disease labels that on a historical basis may be real. Edward Shorter proposes a history-driven alternative to the DSM.

The Book Of Woe

Author: Gary Greenberg
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101621109
Size: 32.30 MB
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“Gary Greenberg has become the Dante of our psychiatric age, and the DSM-5 is his Inferno.” —Errol Morris Since its debut in 1952, the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders has set down the “official” view on what constitutes mental illness. Homosexuality, for instance, was a mental illness until 1973. Each revision has created controversy, but the DSM-5 has taken fire for encouraging doctors to diagnose more illnesses—and to prescribe sometimes unnecessary or harmful medications. Respected author and practicing psychotherapist Gary Greenberg embedded himself in the war that broke out over the fifth edition, and returned with an unsettling tale. Exposing the deeply flawed process behind the DSM-5’s compilation, The Book of Woe reveals how the manual turns suffering into a commodity—and made the APA its own biggest beneficiary.

Diagnosing The Diagnostic And Statistical Manual Of Mental Disorders

Author: Rachel Cooper
Publisher: Karnac Books
ISBN: 1855758253
Size: 21.94 MB
Format: PDF
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The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, more commonly known as the DSM, is published by the American Psychiatric Association and aims to list and describe all mental disorders. The publication of DSM-V in 2013 brought many changes. Diagnosing the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders is written for all those who wonder whether the DSM-V now classifies the right people in the right way. It is aimed at patients, mental health professionals, and academics with an interest in mental health. Issues addressed include: * What are the main changes that have been made to the classification? * How is the DSM affected by financial links with the pharmaceutical industry? * To what extent were patients involved in revising the classification? * How are diagnoses added to the DSM? * Does medicalisation threaten the idea that anyone is normal? * What happens when changes to diagnostic criteria mean that people lose their diagnoses? * How important will the DSM be in the future?

The Routledge History Of Madness And Mental Health

Author: Greg Eghigian
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1351784390
Size: 57.23 MB
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The Routledge History of Madness and Mental Health explores the history and historiography of madness from the ancient and medieval worlds to the present day. Global in scope, it includes case studies from Africa, Asia, and South America as well as Europe and North America, drawing together the latest scholarship and source material in this growing field and allowing for fresh comparisons to be made across time and space. Thematically organised and written by leading academics, chapters discuss broad topics such as the representation of madness in literature and the visual arts, the material culture of madness, the perpetual difficulty of creating a classification system for madness and mental health, madness within life histories, the increased globalisation of knowledge and treatment practices, and the persistence of spiritual and supernatural conceptualisations of experiences associated with madness. This volume also examines the challenges involved in analysing primary sources in this area and how key themes such as class, gender, and race have influenced the treatment and diagnosis of madness throughout history. Chronologically and geographically wide-ranging, and providing a fascinating overview of the current state of the field, this is essential reading for all students of the history of madness, mental health, psychiatry, and medicine.

How Everyone Became Depressed

Author: Edward Shorter
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199948097
Size: 73.94 MB
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About one American in five receives a diagnosis of major depression over the course of a lifetime. That's despite the fact that many such patients have no mood disorder; they're not sad, but suffer from anxiety, fatigue, insomnia, or a tendency to obsess about the whole business. "There is a term for what they have," writes Edward Shorter, "and it's a good old-fashioned term that has gone out of use. They have nerves." In How Everyone Became Depressed, Edward Shorter, a distinguished professor of psychiatry and the history of medicine argues for a return to the old fashioned concept of nervous illness. These are, he writes, diseases of the entire body, not the mind, and as was recognized as early as the 1600s. Shorter traces the evolution of the concept of "nerves" and the "nervous breakdown" in western medical thought. He points to a great paradigm shift in the first third of the twentieth century, driven especially by Freud, that transferred behavioral disorders from neurology to psychiatry, spotlighting the mind, not the body. The catch-all term "depression" now applies to virtually everything, "a jumble of non-disease entities, created by political infighting within psychiatry, by competitive struggles in the pharmaceutical industry, and by the whimsy of the regulators." Depression is a real and very serious illness, he argues; it should not be diagnosed so promiscuously, and certainly not without regard to the rest of the body. Meloncholia, he writes, "the quintessence of the nervous breakdown, reaches deep into the endocrine system, which governs the thyroid and adrenal glands among other organs." In a learned yet provocative challenge to psychiatry, Shorter argues that the continuing misuse of "depression" represents nothing less than "the failure of the scientific imagination."

The Treatment Of Bipolar Disorder

Author: André F. Carvalho
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0198801033
Size: 64.33 MB
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Bipolar disorder is a chronic and debilitating mental illness affecting a significant proportion of the world's population. It is associated with significant impairments in health-related quality of life and psychosocial functioning, and has significant illness-related morbidity and heightened mortality rates due to medical comorbidities and suicide. The management of this disorder requires a complex combination of pharmacological and psychosocial interventions which can be challenging for clinicians. Written by world experts in the field of bipolar disorder, The Treatment of Bipolar Disorder: Integrative Clinical Strategies and Future Directions provides readers with a concise and comprehensive guide to the integrative management of bipolar disorder. This resource contains 31 chapters on the various management choices available, from both established and novel treatment areas, such as psychoeducation, psychotherapeutic interventions, neuromodulatory approaches and novel therapeutic targets. The complexity and diversity of the management choices available makes this a continually evolving field and necessitates forward thinking. By both discussing the current management of bipolar disorder, and the future developments available, this resource provides all clinicians working with patients with bipolar disorder an up-to-date and reflective guide to its management and what the future holds.

Making The Dsm 5

Author: Joel Paris
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1461465044
Size: 80.31 MB
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In 2013, the American Psychiatric Association published the 5th edition of its Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). Often referred to as the “bible” of psychiatry, the manual only classifies mental disorders and does not explain them or guide their treatment. While science should be the basis of any diagnostic system, to date, there is no knowledge on whether most conditions listed in the manual are true diseases. Moreover, in DSM-5 the overall definition of mental disorder is weak, failing to distinguish psychopathology from normality. In spite of all the progress that has been made in neuroscience over the last few decades, the psychiatric community is no closer to understanding the etiology and pathogenesis of mental disorders than it was fifty years ago. In Making the DSM-5, prominent experts delve into the debate about psychiatric nosology and examine the conceptual and pragmatic issues underlying the new manual. While retracing the historic controversy over DSM, considering the political context and economic impact of the manual, and focusing on what was revised or left unchanged in the new edition, this timely volume addresses the main concerns of the future of psychiatry and questions whether the DSM legacy can truly improve the specialty and advance its goals.

Understanding Mental Disorders

Author: American Psychiatric Association
Publisher: American Psychiatric Pub
ISBN: 1585624918
Size: 63.96 MB
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Understanding Mental Disorders: Your Guide to DSM-5® is a consumer guide for anyone who has been touched by mental illness. Most of us know someone who suffers from a mental illness. This book helps those who may be struggling with mental health problems, as well as those who want to help others achieve mental health and well-being. Based on the latest, fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders—known as DSM-5®—Understanding Mental Disorders provides valuable insight on what to expect from an illness and its treatment—and will help readers recognize symptoms, know when to seek help, and get the right care. Featured disorders include depression, schizophrenia, ADHD, autism spectrum disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, and bipolar disorder, among others.

Endocrine Psychiatry

Author: Edward Shorter
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199745548
Size: 32.28 MB
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The riddle of melancholia has stumped generations of doctors. It is a serious depressive illness that often leads to suicide and premature death. The disease's link to biology has been intensively studied. Unlike almost any other psychiatric disorder, melancholia sufferers have abnormal endocrine functions. Tests capable of separating melancholia from other mood disorders were useful discoveries, but these tests fell into disuse as psychiatrists lost interest in biology and medicine. In the nineteenth century, theories about the role of endocrine organs encouraged endocrine treatments that loomed prominently in practice. This interest faded in the 1930s but was revived by the discovery of the adrenal hormone cortisol and descriptions of its abnormal functioning in melancholic and psychotic depressed patients. New endocrine tests were devised to plumb the secrets of mood disorders. Two colorful individuals, Bernard Carroll and Edward Sachar, led this revival and for a time in the 1960s and 1970s intensive research interest established connections between hormone dysfunctions and behavior. In the 1980s, psychiatrists lost interest in hormonal approaches largely because they did not correlate with the arbitrary classification of mood disorders. Today the relation between endocrines and behavior have been disregarded. This history traces the enthusiasm of biological efforts to solve the mystery of melancholia and their fall. Using vibrant language accessible to family care practitioners, psychiatrists and interested lay readers, the authors propose that a useful, a potentially live-saving connection between medicine and psychiatry, has been lost.