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When Research Matters

Author: Frederick M. Hess
Publisher: Harvard Education Press
ISBN: 1612500544
Size: 57.34 MB
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When Research Matters considers the complex and crucially important relationship between education research and policy. In examining how and under what conditions research affects education policy, the book focuses on a number of critical issues: the history of the federal role in education policy; the evolving nature of educational policy research; the role of research in debates about reading, NCLB, and “out-of-field” teaching; how research affects policy by shaping public opinion, judicial rulings, and the decisions of district and school leaders; and the incentives that help explain the behavior of researchers and policymakers.

The Impact Of Research In Education

Author: Benjamin Levin
Publisher: Policy Press
ISBN: 1447306201
Size: 15.37 MB
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Research by universities plays an increasingly important role in shaping education policy around the world yet there is much dissatisfaction with the ways that they share that work. This much-needed, original book analyses efforts and systems in nine countries to mobilize research knowledge, describing the various factors that support or inhibit that work. Beginning and concluding chapters offer analytical lenses for understanding these various elements across the cases. Together, this collection from a wide range of experienced contributors, provides an unprecedented international view of the way education research is produced and shared, and provides excellent signposts for improvement for researchers and those interested in more impact from research in education.

The American Education Policy Landscape

Author: Jennifer A. Rippner
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317542347
Size: 61.40 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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In today’s complex educational environment, it’s critical for educators to understand the policy landscape. Research-based and grounded in a non-ideological perspective, The American Education Policy Landscape is an essential guide for educators, graduate students, and policymakers alike. This accessible resource unpacks complex concepts and provides a comprehensive overview of early childhood, K-12, and higher education policy issues, including governance structures at the local, state, and national levels; the process of policymaking; issues of educational finance; and the impact of stakeholders. The American Education Policy Landscape provides aspiring and practicing educators, analysts, researchers, and policymakers with the foundational knowledge and context for understanding education policy, enabling them to make effective decisions, provide informed advice, and craft critical research questions on education.

The Wiley Handbook Of Educational Policy

Author: Rosemary Papa
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1119218446
Size: 23.37 MB
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Illuminates the multiple barriers that plague the education system and shows the way toward enlightened and inclusive educational policy and policymaking This book showcases new scholarship in the broad field of education policy and governance. Authored by some of the field’s foremost scholars, as well as new and up-and-coming academics, this definitive handbook offers a range of cultural, economic, and political perspectives on the state of education policy today. It addresses historic, current, and future education policy—incorporating changing social landscapes of education, economy, and policy. The Wiley Handbook of Educational Policy covers the role of politics in education governance; the politics of philanthropy and for-profits; the culture and economy of professional organizations; the governance of technology integration; and future political realities to global citizenry. Themes and topics range not only across early childhood, K-12, and tertiary forms of schooling, but also across the policy questions and concerns that transcend these distinctions. Each chapter features key words, key questions, conclusions, and thought-provoking ideas that provoke readers to think about ways to improve the current conditions under which educational policy-makers work. Provides a traditional understanding of educational policy Shows how educational policy has changed due to the boom of private funding Explores the changing demographics in education populations over the last 40 years Discusses policies and the ethics of using and overseeing technology in teaching and learning environments Looks at future trends from contemporary political origins The Wiley Handbook of Educational Policy is an important book that should be read by every administrator, policy maker, and educator working in the education system.

Making Research Matter

Author: Linda R. Tropp
Publisher: American Psychological Association (APA)
ISBN: 9781433828249
Size: 30.91 MB
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This volume shows researchers how to bring their scholarship to a broader audience. Contributors explain how to talk to the media, testify as an expert witness, approach governmental organizations, work with schools and students, and influence public policy.

Policy And The Political Life Of Music Education

Author: Richard Colwell
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190246146
Size: 45.20 MB
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Policy and the Political Life of Music Education is the first book of its kind in the field of Music Education. It offers a far-reaching and innovative outlook, bringing together expert voices who provide a multifaceted and global set of insights into a critical arena for action today: policy. On one hand, the book helps the novice to make sense of what policy is, how it functions, and how it is discussed in various parts of the world; while on the other, it offers the experienced educator a set of critically written analyses that outline the state of the play of music education policy thinking. As policy participation remains largely underexplored in music education, the book helps to clarify to teachers how policy thinking does shape educational action and directly influences the nature, extent, and impact of our programs. The goal is to help readers understand the complexities of policy and to become better skilled in how to think, speak, and act in policy terms. The book provides new ways to understand and therefore imagine policy, approximating it to the lives of educators and highlighting its importance and impact. This is an essential read for anyone interested in change and how to better understand decision-making within music and education. Finally, this book, while aimed at the growth of music educators' knowledge-base regarding policy, also fosters 'open thinking' regarding policy as subject, helping educators straddling arts and education to recognize that policy thinking can offer creative designs for educational change.

Scientific Research In Education

Author: National Research Council
Publisher: National Academies Press
ISBN: 9780309133098
Size: 22.35 MB
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Researchers, historians, and philosophers of science have debated the nature of scientific research in education for more than 100 years. Recent enthusiasm for "evidence-based" policy and practice in educationâ€"now codified in the federal law that authorizes the bulk of elementary and secondary education programsâ€"have brought a new sense of urgency to understanding the ways in which the basic tenets of science manifest in the study of teaching, learning, and schooling. Scientific Research in Education describes the similarities and differences between scientific inquiry in education and scientific inquiry in other fields and disciplines and provides a number of examples to illustrate these ideas. Its main argument is that all scientific endeavors share a common set of principles, and that each fieldâ€"including education researchâ€"develops a specialization that accounts for the particulars of what is being studied. The book also provides suggestions for how the federal government can best support high-quality scientific research in education.

Education Past And Present

Author: Megin Charner-Laird
Publisher: Harvard Educational Publishing Group
ISBN:
Size: 27.56 MB
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"Education Past and Present examines developments in the field of education over the past seventy-five years. Published at the start of the Harvard Educational Review's 75th anniversary year, it offers striking insights into educational history, psychology, policy, international education, and U.S. public education. These essays discuss how education scholars and practitioners have embraced, resisted, and sometimes provoked changes in this immensely important field." "Featuring some of the foremost scholars in the field, Education Past and Present offers a concise, multidisciplinary assessment of the last seventy-five years of developments in education. The book will prove indispensable for those interested in assessing educational progress to date and in gaining a keen sense of the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead."--BOOK JACKET.

Inside The College Gates

Author: Jenny M. Stuber
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 9780739149003
Size: 29.36 MB
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To date, scholars in higher education have examined the ways in which students' experiences in the classroom and the human capital they attain impact social class inequalities. In this book, Jenny Stuber argues that the experiential core of college life-the social and extra-curricular worlds of higher education-operates as a setting in which social class inequalities manifest and get reproduced. As college students form friendships and get involved in activities like Greek life, study abroad, and student government, they acquire the social and cultural resources that give them access to valuable social and occupational opportunities beyond the college gates. Yet students' social class backgrounds also impact how they experience the experiential core of college life, structuring their abilities to navigate their campus's social and extra-curricular worlds. Stuber shows that upper-middle-class students typically arrive on campus with sophisticated maps and navigational devices to guide their journeys-while working-class students are typically less well equipped for the journey. She demonstrates, as well, that students' social interactions, friendships, and extra-curricular involvements also shape-and are shaped by-their social class worldviews-the ideas they have about their own and others' class identities and their beliefs about where they and others fit within the class system. By focusing on student' social class worldviews, this book provides insight into how identities and consciousness are shaped within educational settings. Ultimately, this examination of what happens inside the college gates shows how which higher education serves as an avenue for social reproduction, while also providing opportunities for the contestation of class inequalities.

Mosquito Trails

Author: Alex M. Nading
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520282620
Size: 49.66 MB
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Dengue fever is the world’s most prevalent mosquito-borne illness, but Alex Nading argues that people in dengue-endemic communities do not always view humans and mosquitoes as mortal enemies. Drawing on two years of ethnographic research in urban Nicaragua and challenging current global health approaches to animal-borne illness, Mosquito Trails tells the story of a group of community health workers who struggle to come to terms with dengue epidemics amid poverty, political change, and economic upheaval. Blending theory from medical anthropology, political ecology, and science and technology studies, Nading develops the concept of “the politics of entanglement” to describe how Nicaraguans strive to remain alive to the world around them despite global health strategies that seek to insulate them from their environments. This innovative ethnography illustrates the continued significance of local environmental histories, politics, and household dynamics to the making and unmaking of a global pandemic.