Download why dont students like school a cognitive scientist answers questions about how the mind works and what it means for the classroom in pdf or read why dont students like school a cognitive scientist answers questions about how the mind works and what it means for the classroom in pdf online books in PDF, EPUB and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to get why dont students like school a cognitive scientist answers questions about how the mind works and what it means for the classroom in pdf book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want.



Why Don T Students Like School

Author: Daniel T. Willingham
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9780470730454
Size: 68.72 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 5615
Download and Read
Easy-to-apply, scientifically-based approaches for engaging students in the classroom Cognitive scientist Dan Willingham focuses his acclaimed research on the biological and cognitive basis of learning. His book will help teachers improve their practice by explaining how they and their students think and learn. It reveals-the importance of story, emotion, memory, context, and routine in building knowledge and creating lasting learning experiences. Nine, easy-to-understand principles with clear applications for the classroom Includes surprising findings, such as that intelligence is malleable, and that you cannot develop "thinking skills" without facts How an understanding of the brain's workings can help teachers hone their teaching skills "Mr. Willingham's answers apply just as well outside the classroom. Corporate trainers, marketers and, not least, parents -anyone who cares about how we learn-should find his book valuable reading." —Wall Street Journal

Individualized Learning With Technology

Author: Chris Bernat
Publisher: R&L Education
ISBN: 147580587X
Size: 40.20 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 6043
Download and Read
This book can be a starting point for secondary education majors, high school teachers, and administrators to begin to consider how individualizing instruction could be done for high school students. With computerized applications implemented alongside a standardized curriculum, it can be possible for individual student needs to be met while also ensuring that group needs are also met. A powerful motivational factor can also be introduced that will make students want to learn, and to be life-long learners. The time is now.

Study Less Learn More

Author: Michael W. Wiederman
Publisher: Mindful Publications
ISBN: 0981853412
Size: 13.21 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 3671
Download and Read
"With this book you'll learn how memory and attention work, and how to put these insights into practice for the most effective and efficient studying. You'll also find research-based answers to questions such as what a study environment should look like, what you need to be doing in class and during study sessions, and how long and how often you should be studying for maximum results."--Back cover.

Critical Thinking For Better Learning

Author: Carole Hamilton
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1475827806
Size: 15.27 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 5937
Download and Read
Critical Thinking for Better Learning shifts the focus from teaching to learning and from presenting information to creating challenges that teach students how to think in your discipline. The shift derives from three new insights from cognitive science: that we think by analogy, that we learn best when we process clear, focused sources and develop our own theories about our findings, and that there are key threshold concepts that define the discipline and make it attractive to young practitioners. This book explains each of these insights in direct, clear language, with examples of how to implement them in your own classroom.

Learn Or Die

Author: Edward D. Hess
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231538278
Size: 34.98 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 5812
Download and Read

How It S Being Done

Author: Karin Chenoweth
Publisher: Harvard Education Press
ISBN: 1612500153
Size: 36.96 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 3120
Download and Read
How It’s Being Done offers much-needed help to educators, providing detailed accounts of the ways in which unexpected schools—those with high-poverty and high-minority student populations—have dramatically boosted student achievement. How It’s Being Done builds on Karin Chenoweth’s widely hailed earlier volume, “It’s Being Done,” providing specific information about how such schools have exceeded expectations and met with unprecedented levels of success.

Developing Faculty Learning Communities At Two Year Colleges

Author: Susan Sipple
Publisher: Stylus Publishing, LLC
ISBN: 157922847X
Size: 31.59 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 5829
Download and Read
This book introduces community college faculty and faculty developers to the use of faculty learning communities (FLCs) as a means for faculty themselves to investigate and surmount student learning problems they encounter in their classrooms, and as an effective and low-cost strategy for faculty developers working with few resources to stimulate innovative teaching that leads to student persistence and improved learning outcomes. Two-year college instructors face the unique challenge of teaching a mix of learners, from the developmental to high-achievers, that requires using a variety of instructional strategies and techniques. Even the most experienced teachers can find this diversity demanding. Faculty developers at many two-year colleges still rely solely on the one-day workshop model that, while useful, rarely results in sustained student-centered changes in pedagogy or the curriculum, and may not be practicable for the growing cohort of part-time faculty members. By linking work in the classroom with scholarship and reflection, FLCs provide participants with a sense of renewed engagement and stimulate collegial exploration of ways to achieve educational excellence. FLCs are usually faculty-instigated and cross-disciplinary, and comprise groups of six to fifteen faculty that work collaboratively through regular meetings over an extended period of time to promote research and an exchange of experiences, foster community, and develop the scholarship of teaching. FLCs alleviate burnout and isolation, promote the development, testing, and peer review of new classroom strategies or technologies, and lead to the reenergizing and professionalization of teachers. This book introduces the reader to FLCs and to the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, offering examples of application in two-year colleges. Individual chapters describe, among others, an FLC set up to support course redesign; an “Adjunct Connectivity FLC” to integrate part-time faculty within a department and collaborate on the curriculum; a cross-disciplinary FLC to promote student self-regulated learning, and improve academic performance and persistence; a critical thinking FLC that sought to define critical thinking in separate disciplines, examine interdisciplinary cross-over of critical thinking, and measure critical thinking more accurately; an FLC that researched the transfer of learning and developed strategies to promote students’ application of their learning across courses and beyond the classroom. Each chapter describes the formation of its FLC, the processes it engaged in, what worked and did not, and the outcomes achieved. Just as when college faculty fail to remain current in their fields, the failure to engage in continuing development of teaching skills, will equally lead teaching and learning to suffer. When two-year college administrators restrain scholarship and reflection as inappropriate for the real work of the institution they are in fact hindering the professionalization of their teaching force that is essential to institutional mission and student success. When FLCs are supported by leaders and administrators, and faculty learn that collaboration and peer review are valued and even expected as part of being a teaching professional, they become intrinsically motivated and committed to collaboratively solving problems, setting the institution on a path to becoming a learning organization that is proactive and adept at navigating change.

Experiential Learning

Author: David A. Kolb
Publisher: FT Press
ISBN: 0133892506
Size: 60.55 MB
Format: PDF
View: 7720
Download and Read
Experiential learning is a powerful and proven approach to teaching and learning that is based on one incontrovertible reality: people learn best through experience. Now, in this extensively updated book, David A. Kolb offers a systematic and up-to-date statement of the theory of experiential learning and its modern applications to education, work, and adult development. Experiential Learning, Second Edition builds on the intellectual origins of experiential learning as defined by figures such as John Dewey, Kurt Lewin, Jean Piaget, and L.S. Vygotsky, while also reflecting three full decades of research and practice since the classic first edition. Kolb models the underlying structures of the learning process based on the latest insights in psychology, philosophy, and physiology. Building on his comprehensive structural model, he offers an exceptionally useful typology of individual learning styles and corresponding structures of knowledge in different academic disciplines and careers. Kolb also applies experiential learning to higher education and lifelong learning, especially with regard to adult education. This edition reviews recent applications and uses of experiential learning, updates Kolb's framework to address the current organizational and educational landscape, and features current examples of experiential learning both in the field and in the classroom. It will be an indispensable resource for everyone who wants to promote more effective learning: in higher education, training, organizational development, lifelong learning environments, and online.

Facilitating Seven Ways Of Learning

Author: James R. Davis
Publisher: Stylus Publishing, LLC
ISBN: 1579228437
Size: 80.41 MB
Format: PDF
View: 5015
Download and Read
For teachers in higher education who haven’t been able to catch up with developments in teaching and learning, James Davis and Bridget Arend offer an introduction that focuses on seven coherent and proven evidence-based strategies. The underlying rationale is to provide a framework to match teaching goals to distinct ways of learning, based on well-established theories of learning. The authors present approaches that readers can readily and safely experiment with to achieve desired learning outcomes, and build confidence in changing their methods of teaching. Research on learning clearly demonstrates that learning is not one thing, but many. The learning associated with developing a skill is different from the learning associated with understanding and remembering information, which in turn is different from thinking critically and creatively, solving problems, making decisions, or change paradigms in the light of evidence. Differing outcomes involve different ways of learning and teaching strategies. The authors provide the reader with a conceptual approach for selecting appropriate teaching strategies for different types of content, and for achieving specific learning objectives. They demonstrate through examples how a focused and purposeful selection of activities improves student performance, and in the process makes for a more effective and satisfying teaching experience. The core of the book presents a chapter on each of the seven ways of learning. Each chapter offers a full description of the process, illustrates its application with examples from different academic fields and types of institutions, clearly describes the teacher’s facilitation role, and covers assessment and online use. The seven ways of learning are: Behavioral Learning; Cognitive Learning; Learning through Inquiry; Learning with Mental Models; Learning through Groups and Teams; Learning through Virtual Realities; and Experiential Learning. Along the way, the authors provide the reader with a basis for evaluating other approaches to teaching and other learning methodologies so that she or he can confidently go beyond the “seven ways” to adapt or adopt further strategies. This is the ideal companion for teachers who are beginning to explore new ways of teaching, and want to do some serious independent thinking about learning. The book can also be used to prepare graduate students for teaching, and will be welcomed by centers for teaching and learning to help continuing faculty re-examine a particular aspect of their teaching.

The Learner Centered Curriculum

Author: Roxanne Cullen
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118171020
Size: 15.24 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 334
Download and Read
Praise for The Learner-Centered Curriculum "Cullen, Harris, and Hill provide a clear and practical framework for addressing the root of the problems of today's universities. The authors provide a lucid, actionable, and evidence-based prescription for building an integrated learning system to replace the hodgepodge of miscellany that we have inherited. They illustrate the kind of conversations and transformations that could raise the value of and change the prospects for higher education."—John Tagg, author, The Learning Paradigm College "This book offers a powerful, realistic, and much-needed plan for changing how learning happens in higher education. Anyone concerned about improving teaching and students' learning needs to read this book!"—Terry Doyle, author, Helping Students Learn in a Learner-Centered Environment "To help achieve the imperative to make our universities more learner-centered, the authors focus on curriculum redesign and offer a solid theoretical approach combined with applied skills that institutional leaders and faculty can use to attain their goals. Shared governance, autonomous learning, assessment, technology, and physical space are among the elements discussed in this excellent book that universities will need to consider when developing a new curriculum that is more learner-centered."—Jolene Koester, president, California State University, Northridge "Cullen, Harris, and Hill provide a thought-provoking resource with the compelling advantages and frameworks to create twenty-first-century student-centered, knowledge-centered, assessment-centered, and community-centered curriculum. This is a must-read for faculty and administrators committed to transforming their curriculum in order to educate better prepared graduates."—Deborah L. Ford, chancellor, University of Wisconsin-Parkside "This is the book that I have been looking for. Written by three leaders who have done the heavy lifting of leading real change, it's a book for every academic leader who understands that innovation is essential to the future of higher education."—Earl H. Potter, III, president, St. Cloud State University