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Why You Can T Teach United States History Without American Indians

Author: Susan Sleeper-Smith
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469621215
Size: 33.93 MB
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A resource for all who teach and study history, this book illuminates the unmistakable centrality of American Indian history to the full sweep of American history. The nineteen essays gathered in this collaboratively produced volume, written by leading scholars in the field of Native American history, reflect the newest directions of the field and are organized to follow the chronological arc of the standard American history survey. Contributors reassess major events, themes, groups of historical actors, and approaches--social, cultural, military, and political--consistently demonstrating how Native American people, and questions of Native American sovereignty, have animated all the ways we consider the nation's past. The uniqueness of Indigenous history, as interwoven more fully in the American story, will challenge students to think in new ways about larger themes in U.S. history, such as settlement and colonization, economic and political power, citizenship and movements for equality, and the fundamental question of what it means to be an American. Contributors are Chris Andersen, Juliana Barr, David R. M. Beck, Jacob Betz, Paul T. Conrad, Mikal Brotnov Eckstrom, Margaret D. Jacobs, Adam Jortner, Rosalyn R. LaPier, John J. Laukaitis, K. Tsianina Lomawaima, Robert J. Miller, Mindy J. Morgan, Andrew Needham, Jean M. O'Brien, Jeffrey Ostler, Sarah M. S. Pearsall, James D. Rice, Phillip H. Round, Susan Sleeper-Smith, and Scott Manning Stevens.

American Indians In U S History

Author: Roger L. Nichols
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 0806187166
Size: 24.67 MB
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This one-volume narrative history of American Indians in the United States traces the experiences of indigenous peoples from early colonial times to the present day, demonstrating how Indian existence has varied and changed throughout our nation’s history. Although popular opinion and standard histories often depict tribal peoples as victims of U.S. aggression, that is only a part of their story. In American Indians in U.S. History, Roger L. Nichols focuses on the ideas, beliefs, and actions of American Indian individuals and tribes, showing them to be significant agents in their own history. Designed as a brief survey for students and general readers, this volume addresses the histories of tribes throughout the entire United States. Offering readers insight into broad national historical patterns, it explores the wide variety of tribes and relates many fascinating stories of individual and tribal determination, resilience, and long-term success. Charting Indian history in roughly chronological chapters, Nichols presents the central issues tribal leaders faced during each era and demonstrates that, despite their frequently changing status, American Indians have maintained their cultures, identities, and many of their traditional lifeways. Far from “vanishing” or disappearing into the “melting pot,” American Indians have struggled for sovereignty and are today a larger, stronger part of the U.S. population than they have been in several centuries.

Dancing At Halftime

Author: Carol Spindel
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814781268
Size: 28.22 MB
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A topical discussion of the controversial use of American Indian mascots by college-level and professional sports teams.

The White Man S Indian

Author: Robert F. Berkhofer
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307761975
Size: 25.77 MB
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Columbus called them "Indians" because his geography was faulty. But that name and, more importantly, the images it has come to suggest have endured for five centuries, not only obscuring the true identity of the original Americans but serving as an idealogical weapon in their subjugation. Now, in this brilliant and deeply disturbing reinterpretation of the American past, Robert Berkhofer has written an impressively documented account of the self-serving stereotypes Europeans and white Americans have concocted about the "Indian": Noble Savage or bloodthirsty redskin, he was deemed inferior in the light of western, Christian civilization and manipulated to its benefit. A thought-provoking and revelatory study of the absolute, seemingly ineradicable pervasiveness of white racism, The White Man's Indian is a truly important book which penetrates to the very heart of our understanding of ourselves. "A splendid inquiry into, and analysis of, the process whereby white adventurers and the white middle class fabricated the Indian to their own advantage. It deserves a wide and thoughtful readership." —Chronicle of Higher Education "A compelling and definitive history...of racist preconceptions in white behavior toward native Americans." —Leo Marx, The New York Times Book Review

The Oxford Handbook Of American Indian History

Author: Frederick E. Hoxie
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190614021
Size: 31.22 MB
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"Everything you know about Indians is wrong." As the provocative title of Paul Chaat Smith's 2009 book proclaims, everyone knows about Native Americans, but most of what they know is the fruit of stereotypes and vague images. The real people, real communities, and real events of indigenous America continue to elude most people. The Oxford Handbook of American Indian History confronts this erroneous view by presenting an accurate and comprehensive history of the indigenous peoples who lived-and live-in the territory that became the United States. Thirty-two leading experts, both Native and non-Native, describe the historical developments of the past 500 years in American Indian history, focusing on significant moments of upheaval and change, histories of indigenous occupation, and overviews of Indian community life. The first section of the book charts Indian history from before 1492 to European invasions and settlement, analyzing US expansion and its consequences for Indian survival up to the twenty-first century. A second group of essays consists of regional and tribal histories. The final section illuminates distinctive themes of Indian life, including gender, sexuality and family, spirituality, art, intellectual history, education, public welfare, legal issues, and urban experiences. A much-needed and eye-opening account of American Indians, this Handbook unveils the real history often hidden behind wrong assumptions, offering stimulating ideas and resources for new generations to pursue research on this topic.

Nation To Nation

Author: Suzan Shown Harjo
Publisher: Smithsonian Books
ISBN: 1588344789
Size: 19.94 MB
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"Approximately 368 treaties were negotiated and signed by U.S. commissioners and tribal leaders (and subsequently approved by the U.S. Senate) from 1777 to 1868. These treaties enshrine promises the U.S. government made to Indian people and recognize tribes as nations--a fact that distinguishes tribal citizens from other Americans, and supports contemporary Native assertions of tribal sovereignty and self-determination. Treaties are legally binding and still in effect. Beginning in the 1960s, Native activists invoked America's growing commitment to social justice to restore broken treaties. Today, the reassertion of treaty rights and tribal self-determination is evident in renewed tribal political, economic, and cultural strength, as well as in reinvigorated nation-to-nation relations with the United States"--

Say We Are Nations

Author: Daniel M. Cobb
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469624818
Size: 47.82 MB
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In this wide-ranging and carefully curated anthology, Daniel M. Cobb presents the words of Indigenous people who have shaped Native American rights movements from the late nineteenth century through the present day. Presenting essays, letters, interviews, speeches, government documents, and other testimony, Cobb shows how tribal leaders, intellectuals, and activists deployed a variety of protest methods over more than a century to demand Indigenous sovereignty. As these documents show, Native peoples have adopted a wide range of strategies in this struggle, invoking "American" and global democratic ideas about citizenship, freedom, justice, consent of the governed, representation, and personal and civil liberties while investing them with indigenized meanings. The more than fifty documents gathered here are organized chronologically and thematically for ease in classroom and research use. They address the aspirations of Indigenous nations and individuals within Canada, Hawaii, and Alaska as well as the continental United States, placing their activism in both national and international contexts. The collection's topical breadth, analytical framework, and emphasis on unpublished materials offer students and scholars new sources with which to engage and explore American Indian thought and political action.

A Companion To Colonial America

Author: Daniel Vickers
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 0470998482
Size: 57.82 MB
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A Companion to Colonial America consists of twenty-three original essays by expert historians on the key issues and topics in American colonial history. Each essay surveys the scholarship and prevailing interpretations in these key areas, discussing the differing arguments and assessing their merits. Coverage includes politics, religion, migration, gender, ecology, and many others.