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Winning With Words

Author: Brian F. Schaffner
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135840229
Size: 11.69 MB
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Today's politicians and political groups devote great attention and care to how their messages are conveyed. From policy debates in Congress to advertising on the campaign trail, they carefully choose which issues to emphasize and how to discuss them in the hope of affecting the opinions and evaluations of their target audience. This groundbreaking text brings together prominent scholars from political science, communication, and psychology in a tightly focused analysis of both the origins and the real-world impact of framing. Across the chapters, the authors discuss a broad range of contemporary issues, from taxes and health care to abortion, the death penalty, and the teaching of evolution. The chapters also illustrate the wide-ranging relevance of framing for many different contexts in American politics, including public opinion, the news media, election campaigns, parties, interest groups, Congress, the presidency, and the judiciary.

Framing Sarah Palin

Author: Linda Beail
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 0415893364
Size: 59.56 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Sarah Palin’s 2008 vice presidential candidacy garnered tremendous levels of interest, polarizing the American public—both Democrats and Republicans alike. While many have wondered who she "really" is, trying to cut through the persona she projects and the one projected by the media, Beail and Longworth analyze why she touches such a nerve with the American electorate. Why does she ignite such passionate loyalty – and such loathing? How did her candidacy mobilize new parts of the electorate? Using the notion of "framing" as a way of understanding political perception, the authors analyze the narratives told by and about Sarah Palin in the 2008 election – from beauty queen, maverick, faithful fundamentalist and post-feminist role model to pit bull hockey mom, frontier woman, and political outsider. They discuss where those frames are rooted historically in popular and political culture, why they were selected, and the ways that the frames resonated with the electorate. Framing Sarah Palin addresses the question of what the choice and perception of these frames tells us about the state of American politics, and about the status of American women in politics in particular. What do the debates engendered by these images of Palin say about the current roles and power available to women in American society? What are the implications of her experience for future candidates, particularly women candidates, in American politics?

The Oxford Handbook Of Political Communication

Author: Kate Kenski
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190650664
Size: 19.34 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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The scholarly field of political communication emerged in the first half of the twentieth century, amidst the turmoil of two world wars and the emergence of film, radio, and-eventually-television. As a subject of inquiry, political communication is interdisciplinary by its very nature, bridging rhetoric, public opinion, political behavior, political psychology, journalism, media studies, and telecommunications. In The Oxford Handbook of Political Communication, Kate Kenski and Kathleen Hall Jamieson bring together a diverse cast of leading scholars in the field, including some of its founders. Both definitive and foundational, the book covers a vast range of topics, including political advertising, agenda setting, framing, social media, and the functions of the press in a democratic system. The essays in this volume demonstrate that political communication is a hybrid field with complex ancestry, permeable boundaries, and interests that overlap with the related fields of political sociology, public opinion, rhetoric, neuroscience, and media psychology. A major addition to Oxford's handbook series, this is an indispensable reference for scholars and students interested in the study of how, why, when, and with what effect humans make sense of symbolic exchanges about sharing and shared power. The sixty-two chapters in The Oxford Handbook of Political Communication not only offer an overview of past scholarship; they also reflect on its relevance in a changing media landscape and set the agenda for future research in virtually every aspect of the discipline.

Political Communication And Cognition

Author: D. Lilleker
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137313439
Size: 44.56 MB
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Political Communication and Cognition draws on a range of theories from communication psychology to explain how citizens receive communication about politics, how communication might make a citizen think and importantly what stimulates political participation, whether simply paying attention, chatting online or going to vote.

The Unilateral Presidency And The News Media

Author: Mark Major
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137387890
Size: 52.76 MB
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Media coverage of presidential actions can not only serve journalistic purposes, but can also act as a check against unilateral decision making. The book seeks to uncover how the news media has worked to curtail overreaching power within the executive branch, demonstrating how the fourth estate keeps presidential overreach at bay.

Making Sense Of The 2016 Elections

Author: Brian Schaffner
Publisher: CQ Press
ISBN: 1506384196
Size: 55.72 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Get a big picture understanding of what happened in the 2016 elections and why. Designed to be used as a supplement to American politics texts, this brief overview from Brian Schaffner and John Clark provides a concise analysis, going beyond horserace journalism, and gives students an accessible insight into political scientists' view of this ground breaking election. Students will benefit from seeing how broader political science concepts apply to a campaign and election that is fresh in their minds. Whether packaged with another SAGE | CQ Press title or used on its own, Schaffner and Clark’s Making Sense of the 2016 Elections will give your students the key insight they need.

Framing American Politics

Author: Karen Callaghan and Frauke Schnell, eds.
Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Press
ISBN: 0822972727
Size: 27.51 MB
Format: PDF
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Most issues in American political life are complex and multifaceted, subject to multiple interpretations and points of view. How issues are framed matters enormously for the way they are understood and debated. For example, is affirmative action a just means toward a diverse society, or is it reverse discrimination? Is the war on terror a defense of freedom and liberty, or is it an attack on privacy and other cherished constitutional rights? Bringing together some of the leading researchers in American politics, Framing American Politics explores the roles that interest groups, political elites, and the media play in framing political issues for the mass public. The contributors address some of the most hotly debated foreign and domestic policies in contemporary American life, focusing on both the origins and process of framing and its effects on citizens. In so doing, these scholars clearly demonstrate how frames can both enhance and hinder political participation and understanding.

Cycles Of Spin

Author: Patrick Sellers
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139482513
Size: 76.61 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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How do politicians try to shape their news coverage? Sellers examines strategic communication campaigns in the U.S. Congress. He argues that these campaigns create cycles of spin: leaders create messages, rank-and-file legislators decide whether to promote those messages, journalists decide whether to cover the messages, and any coverage feeds back to influence the policy process. These four stages are closely related; decisions at one stage influence those at another. Sellers uses diverse evidence, from participant observation and press secretary interviews, to computerized content analysis and vector auto regression. The result is a comprehensive and unprecedented examination of politicians' promotional campaigns and journalists' coverage of those campaigns. Countering numerous critics of spin, Sellers offers the provocative argument that the promotional messages have their origins in the actual policy preferences of members of Congress. The campaigns to promote these messages thus can help the public learn about policy debates in Congress.