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Wisconsin Sentencing In The Tough On Crime Era

Author: Michael O'Hear
Publisher: University of Wisconsin Pres
ISBN: 0299310205
Size: 17.35 MB
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The dramatic increase in U.S. prison populations since the 1970s is often blamed on mandatory sentencing laws, but this case study of a state with judicial discretion in sentencing reveals that other significant factors influence high incarceration rates.

Wisconsin Sentencing In The Tough On Crime Era

Author: Michael O'Hear
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780299310233
Size: 11.35 MB
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The dramatic increase in U.S. prison populations since the 1970s is often blamed on the mandatory sentencing required by ""three strikes"" laws and other punitive crime bills. Michael O'Hear shows that the blame is actually not so easily assigned. His meticulous analysis of incarceration in Wisconsin-a state where judges have considerable discretion in sentencing-explores the reasons why the prison population has ballooned nearly tenfold over the past forty years.O'Hear tracks the effects of sentencing laws and politics in Wisconsin from the eve of the imprisonment boom in 1970 up to the 2010s.

If You Don T Laugh You Ll Cry

Author: Claire Schmidt
Publisher: University of Wisconsin Pres
ISBN: 0299313506
Size: 76.95 MB
Format: PDF
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Introduces readers to prison workers as they share stories, debate the role of corrections in American racial politics and social justice, and talk about the important function of humor in their jobs.

The Failed Promise Of Sentencing Reform

Author: Michael O'Hear
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1440840881
Size: 44.87 MB
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Despite 15 years of reform efforts, the incarceration rate in the United States remains at an unprecedented high level. This book provides the first comprehensive survey of these reforms and explains why they have proven to be ineffective. • Clearly identifies the real reasons that the wave of post-2000 sentencing reform has had minimal impact on reducing national imprisonment rates • Explains why reforms must target the excessive sentences imposed on violent and sexual offenders, even though the members of these offender groups are considered "justifiably punished" by long prison terms in the public eye • Enables readers to understand why increased consideration for the well-being of offenders and their families is likely a prerequisite to the acceptance of more fundamental changes to the U.S. sentencing system

The Failed Promise Of Sentencing Reform

Author: Michael O'Hear
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1440840881
Size: 52.34 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 7006
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Despite 15 years of reform efforts, the incarceration rate in the United States remains at an unprecedented high level. This book provides the first comprehensive survey of these reforms and explains why they have proven to be ineffective. • Clearly identifies the real reasons that the wave of post-2000 sentencing reform has had minimal impact on reducing national imprisonment rates • Explains why reforms must target the excessive sentences imposed on violent and sexual offenders, even though the members of these offender groups are considered "justifiably punished" by long prison terms in the public eye • Enables readers to understand why increased consideration for the well-being of offenders and their families is likely a prerequisite to the acceptance of more fundamental changes to the U.S. sentencing system

Not A Crime To Be Poor

Author: Peter Edelman
Publisher: The New Press
ISBN: 162097164X
Size: 70.83 MB
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Finalist for the American Bar Association’s 2018 Silver Gavel Book Award Named one of the “10 books to read after you've read Evicted” by the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel “A powerful investigation into the ways the United States has addressed poverty. . . . Lucid and troubling.” —Matthew Desmond, author of Evicted, in The Chronicle of Higher Education A nationally known expert on poverty shows how not having money has been criminalized and shines a light on lawyers, activists, and policy makers working for a more humane approach In addition to exposing racially biased policing, the Justice Department’s Ferguson Report exposed to the world a system of fines and fees levied for minor crimes in Ferguson, Missouri, that, when they proved too expensive for Ferguson’s largely poor, African American population, resulted in jail sentences for thousands of people. As former staffer to Robert F. Kennedy and current Georgetown law professor Peter Edelman explains in Not a Crime to Be Poor, Ferguson is everywhere in America today. Through money bail systems, fees and fines, strictly enforced laws and regulations against behavior including trespassing and public urination that largely affect the homeless, and the substitution of prisons and jails for the mental hospitals that have traditionally served the impoverished, in one of the richest countries on Earth we have effectively made it a crime to be poor. Edelman, who famously resigned from the administration of Bill Clinton over welfare "reform," connects the dots between these policies and others including school discipline in poor communities, child support policies affecting the poor, public housing ordinances, addiction treatment, and the specter of public benefits fraud to paint a picture of a mean-spirited, retributive system that seals whole communities into inescapable cycles of poverty.

Prisons And Punishment In America Examining The Facts

Author: Michael O'Hear
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1440855439
Size: 51.59 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Synthesizing the latest scholarship in law and the social sciences on criminal sentencing and corrections, this book provides a thorough, balanced, and accessible survey of the major policy issues in these fields of persistent public interest and political debate. • Provides readers with an accessible introduction to important, timely topics of public debate • Maintains a neutral, balanced perspective on a subject often a matter of heated partisanship • Reveals the subtle connections between different aspects of the criminal justice system that are often missed in policy discussions • Synthesizes leading academic work in law and the social sciences • Provides a balanced assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of significant reform proposals

Defending The Masses

Author: Eric B. Easton
Publisher: University of Wisconsin Pres
ISBN: 0299314006
Size: 66.19 MB
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Free speech and freedom of the press were often suppressed amid the social turbulence of the Progressive Era and World War I. As muckrakers, feminists, pacifists, anarchists, socialists, and communists were arrested or censored for their outspoken views, many of them turned to a Manhattan lawyer named Gilbert Roe to keep them in business and out of jail. Roe was the principal trial lawyer of the Free Speech League—a precursor of the American Civil Liberties Union. His cases involved such activists as Emma Goldman, Lincoln Steffens, Margaret Sanger, Max Eastman, Upton Sinclair, John Reed, and Eugene Debs, as well as the socialist magazine The Masses and the New York City Teachers Union. A friend of Wisconsin's progressive senator Robert La Follette since their law partnership as young men, Roe defended "Fighting Bob" when the Senate tried to expel him for opposing America's entry into World War I. In articulating and upholding Americans' fundamental right to free expression against charges of obscenity, libel, espionage, sedition, or conspiracy during turbulent times, Roe was rarely successful in the courts. But his battles illuminate the evolution of free speech doctrine and practice in an era when it was under heavy assault. His greatest victory, including the 1917 decision by Judge Learned Hand in The Masses Publishing Co. v. Patten, is still influential today.

Masculinities And Markets

Author: Brenda Parker
Publisher: Geographies of Justice and Soc
ISBN: 9780820335117
Size: 70.30 MB
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Studies of urban neoliberalism have been surprisingly inattentive to gender. Brenda Parker begins to remedy this by looking at the effect of new urbanism, "creative class," and welfare reform discourses on women in Milwaukee, a traditionally progressive city with a strong history of political organizing. Through a feminist partial political economy of place (FPEP) approach, Parker conducts an intersectional analysis of urban politics that simultaneously pays attention to a number of power relations. She argues that in the 1990s and 2000s, the city's business-friendly agenda--although couched in uplifting rhetoric--strengthened existing hierarchies not only in class and race but also in gender. Taking on municipal elites' adoption of Richard Florida's "creative class" thesis, for example, Parker looks at the group Young Professionals of Milwaukee, exposing the way that a "creative careers" focus advances fundamentally masculine values and interests. She concludes with a case study that shows how gender and race mattered in the design, enactment, and contestation of an uneven urban redevelopment project. At once a case study of the city and a theorization of urban neoliberalism, Masculinities and Markets highlights how urban politics and discourses in U.S. cities have changed over the years.

Rampage Nation

Author: Louis Klarevas
Publisher: Prometheus Books
ISBN: 1633880672
Size: 51.12 MB
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In the past decade, no individual act of violence has killed more people in the United States than the mass shooting. This well-researched, forcefully argued book answers some of the most pressing questions facing our society: Why do people go on killing sprees? Are gun-free zones magnets for deadly rampages? What can we do to curb the carnage of this disturbing form of firearm violence? Contrary to conventional wisdom, the author shows that gun possession often prods aggrieved, mentally unstable individuals to go on shooting sprees; these attacks largely occur in places where guns are not prohibited by law; and sensible gun-control measures like the federal Assault Weapons Ban—which helped drastically reduce rampage violence when it was in effect—are instrumental to keeping Americans safe from mass shootings in the future. To stem gun massacres, the author proposes several original policy prescriptions, ranging from the enactment of sensible firearm safety reforms to an overhaul of how the justice system investigates potential active-shooter threats and prosecutes violent crimes. Calling attention to the growing problem of mass shootings, Rampage Nation demonstrates that this unique form of gun violence is more than just a criminal justice offense or public health scourge. It is a threat to American security. From the Hardcover edition.