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Among The Lowest Of The Dead

Author: Dave Von Drehle
Publisher: Crown
ISBN:
Size: 10.95 MB
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A study of the human side of the death penalty shares portraits of survivors of murder victims awaiting justice, lawyers on both sides of cases, judges who pronounce sentences, governors who sign death warrants, and, above all, the condemned. 50,000 first printing. $60,000 ad/promo. Tour.

Women And Capital Punishment In The United States

Author: David V. Baker
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 1476622884
Size: 47.69 MB
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The history of the execution of women in the United States has largely been ignored and scholars have given scant attention to gender issues in capital punishment. This historical analysis examines the social, political and economic contexts in which the justice system has put women to death, revealing a pattern of patriarchal domination and female subordination. The book includes a discussion of condemned women granted executive clemency and judicial commutations, an inquiry into women falsely convicted in potentially capital cases and a profile of the current female death row population.

The Death Penalty In The United States

Author: Louis J. Palmer, Jr.
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 1476605793
Size: 25.59 MB
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The death penalty landscape has changed considerably since the 1998 first edition of this book. For example, six states that had the death penalty—Connecticut, Illinois, Maryland, New Jersey, New Mexico and New York—no longer impose the punishment. Some of the changes set out in this second edition involve discussions of all of the significant cases decided by the United States Supreme Court after 1998, including Roper v. Simmons, 543 U.S. 551 (2005); Atkins v. Virginia, 536 U.S. 304 (2002); Schriro v. Smith, 126 S.Ct. 7 (2005); Harbison v. Bell, 129 S.Ct. 1481 (2009); Holmes v. South Carolina, 126 S.Ct. 1727 (2006); Kansas v. Marsh, 126 S.Ct. 2516 (2006); Ring v. Arizona, 536 U.S. 584 (2002); Sattazahn v. Pennsylvania, 537 U.S. 101 (2003). This new edition includes 13 new chapters. They cover such topics as capital felon’s defense team; habeas corpus, coram nobis and section 1983 proceedings; the Innocence protection act and post-conviction DNA testing; challenging the death sentence under racial justice acts; inhabited American territories; and the costs of capital punishment.

Violence

Author: Tobe Levin
Publisher: Rodopi
ISBN: 9042024038
Size: 68.61 MB
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“One afternoon, a patient who had been in three times weekly ... psychotherapy ... left my office after her session, drove down to the train tracks half a mile from my office, and sat down facing an oncoming train.” This tragic event opens the essay by psychoanalyst Susanne Chassay who explores the relationship between private and political terrorism. Her viewpoint complements analyses of violence – that 'mercurial gestalt' – by other contributors to this collection derived from a 2003 Cultures of Violence conference held at St. Catherine's College, Oxford, organized by the Inter-disciplinary Net. From fields as diverse as philosophy, sociology, psychology, history, political science, literary criticism, and forensics, authors consider, for instance, hostility to European minorities; military training and torture; the 'endemic violence' aesthetically recorded by Haitian novelists; child abuse in film; female genital mutilation in fiction; or the massacre of Koreans during the 1923 Japanese earthquake. Violence in contact zones in Northern Ireland or in the memory of South African museum directors trying to comply with Truth and Reconciliation Commission mandates is also an object of scrutiny here. Finally, that vexed, primordial issue of violence – nature or nurture? – is probed.

The Penalty Is Death

Author: Marlin Shipman
Publisher: University of Missouri Press
ISBN: 9780826263056
Size: 27.59 MB
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In 1872 Susan Eberhart was convicted of murder for helping her lover to kill his wife. The Atlanta Constitution ran a story about her hanging in Georgia that covered slightly more than four full columns of text. In an editorial sermon about her, the Constitution said that Miss Eberhart not only committed murder, but also committed adultery and "violated the sanctity of marriage." An 1890 article in the Elko Independent said of Elizabeth Potts, who was hanged for murder, "To her we look for everything that is gentle and kind and tender; and we can scarcely conceive her capable of committing the highest crime known to the law." Indeed, at the time, this attitude was also applied to women in general. By 1998 the press's and society's attitudes had changed dramatically. A columnist from Texas wrote that convicted murderess Karla Faye Tucker should not be spared just because she was a woman. The author went on to say that women could be just as violent and aggressive as men; the idea that women are defenseless and need men's protection "is probably the last vestige of institutionalized sexism that needs to be rubbed out."

Allgemeine Erkl Rung Der Menschenrechte

Author: Vereinte Nationen
Publisher: Aegitas
ISBN: 500064137X
Size: 78.33 MB
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Die Allgemeine Erklärung der Menschenrechte (A/RES/217, UN-Doc. 217/A-(III)), auch: Deklaration der Menschenrechte oder UN-Menschenrechtscharta oder kurz AEMR, ist das ausdrückliche Bekenntnis der Vereinten Nationen zu den allgemeinen Grundsätzen der Menschenrechte. Es wurde am 10. Dezember 1948 von der Generalversammlung der Vereinten Nationen im Palais de Chaillot in Paris genehmigt und verkündet.

Inner Lives

Author: Paula Johnson
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814743854
Size: 55.25 MB
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The rate of women entering prison has increased nearly 400 percent since 1980, with African American women constituting the largest percentage of this population. However, despite their extremely disproportional representation in correctional institutions, little attention has been paid to their experiences within the criminal justice system. Inner Lives provides readers the rare opportunity to intimately connect with African American women prisoners. By presenting the women's stories in their own voices, Paula C. Johnson captures the reality of those who are in the system, and those who are working to help them. Johnson offers a nuanced and compelling portrait of this fastest-growing prison population by blending legal history, ethnography, sociology, and criminology. These striking and vivid narratives are accompanied by equally compelling arguments by Johnson on how to reform our nation's laws and social policies, in order to eradicate existing inequalities. Her thorough and insightful analysis of the historical and legal background of contemporary criminal law doctrine, sentencing theories, and correctional policies sets the stage for understanding the current system.

The Rope The Chair And The Needle

Author: James W. Marquart
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 9780292752139
Size: 23.52 MB
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In late summer 1923, legal hangings in Texas came to an end, and the electric chair replaced the gallows. Of 520 convicted capital offenders sentenced to die between 1923 and 1972, 361 were actually executed, thus maintaining Texas’ traditional reputation as a staunch supporter of capital punishment. This book is the single most comprehensive examination to date of capital punishment in any one state, drawing on data for legal executions from 1819 to 1990. The authors show persuasively how slavery and the racially biased practice of lynching in Texas led to the institutionalization and public approval of executions skewed according to race, class, and gender, and they also track long-term changes in public opinion up to the present. The stories of the condemned are masterfully interwoven with fact and interpretation to provide compelling reading for scholars of law, criminal justice, race relations, history, and sociology, as well as partisans on both sides of the debate.