Download writing and the digital generation essays on new media rhetoric in pdf or read writing and the digital generation essays on new media rhetoric in pdf online books in PDF, EPUB and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to get writing and the digital generation essays on new media rhetoric in pdf book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want.



Writing And The Digital Generation

Author: Heather Urbanski
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 0786455861
Size: 30.47 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 6642
Download and Read
Is it true that, in this era of digitization and mass media, reading and writing are on the decline? In a thought-provoking collection of essays and profiles, 30 contributors explore what may instead be a rise in rhetorical activity, an upsurge due in part to the sudden blurring of the traditional roles of creator and audience in participatory media. This collection explores topics too often overlooked by traditional academic scholarship, though critical to an exploration of rhetoric and popular culture, including fan fiction, reality television, blogging, online role-playing games, and Fantasy Football. Both scholarly and engaging, this text draws rhetorical studies into the digital age.

The Routledge Handbook Of Digital Writing And Rhetoric

Author: Jonathan Alexander
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1315518473
Size: 25.45 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 2150
Download and Read
This handbook brings together scholars from around the globe who here contribute to our understanding of how digital rhetoric is changing the landscape of writing. Increasingly, all of us must navigate networks of information, compose not just with computers but an array of mobile devices, increase our technological literacy, and understand the changing dynamics of authoring, writing, reading, and publishing in a world of rich and complex texts. Given such changes, and given the diverse ways in which younger generations of college students are writing, communicating, and designing texts in multimediated, electronic environments, we need to consider how the very act of writing itself is undergoing potentially fundamental changes. These changes are being addressed increasingly by the emerging field of digital rhetoric, a field that attempts to understand the rhetorical possibilities and affordances of writing, broadly defined, in a wide array of digital environments. Of interest to both researchers and students, this volume provides insights about the fields of rhetoric, writing, composition, digital media, literature, and multimodal studies.

Ancient Rhetorics And Digital Networks

Author: Michele Kennerly
Publisher: University of Alabama Press
ISBN: 0817359044
Size: 40.58 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 3111
Download and Read
An examination of two seemingly incongruous areas of study: classical models of argumentation and modern modes of digital communication What can ancient rhetorical theory possibly tell us about the role of new digital media technologies in contemporary public culture? Some central issues we currently deal with—making sense of information abundance, persuading others in our social network, navigating new media ecologies, and shaping broader cultural currents—also pressed upon the ancients. Ancient Rhetorics and Digital Networks makes this connection explicit, reexamining key figures, texts, concepts, and sensibilities from ancient rhetoric in light of the glow of digital networks, or, ordered conversely, surveying the angles and tangles of digital networks from viewpoints afforded by ancient rhetoric. By providing an orientation grounded in ancient rhetorics, this collection simultaneously historicizes contemporary developments and reenergizes ancient rhetorical vocabularies. Contributors engage with a variety of digital phenomena including remix, big data, identity and anonymity, memes and virals, visual images, decorum, and networking. Taken together, the essays in Ancient Rhetorics and Digital Networks help us to understand and navigate some of the fundamental communicative issues we deal with today.

The Rhetoric Of Videogames As Embodied Practice

Author: Steve Holmes
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351399470
Size: 64.30 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 2371
Download and Read
The Rhetoric of Videogames as Embodied Practice offers a critical reassessment of embodiment and materiality in rhetorical considerations of videogames. Holmes argues that rhetorical and philosophical conceptions of "habit" offer a critical resource for describing the interplay between thinking (writing and rhetoric) and embodiment. The book demonstrates how Aristotle's understanding of character (ethos), habit (hexis), and nature (phusis) can productively connect rhetoric to what Holmes calls "procedural habits": the ways in which rhetoric emerges from its interactions with the dynamic accumulation of conscious and nonconscious embodied experiences that consequently give rise to meaning, procedural subjectivity, control, and communicative agency both in digital game design discourse and the activity of play.

Computing As Writing

Author: Daniel Punday
Publisher: U of Minnesota Press
ISBN: 1452944997
Size: 56.77 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 149
Download and Read
This book examines the common metaphor that equates computing and writing, tracing it from the naming of devices (“notebook” computers) through the design of user interfaces (the “desktop”) to how we describe the work of programmers (“writing” code). Computing as Writing ponders both the implications and contradictions of the metaphor. During the past decade, analysis of digital media honed its focus on particular hardware and software platforms. Daniel Punday argues that scholars should, instead, embrace both the power and the fuzziness of the writing metaphor as it relates to computing—which isn’t simply a set of techniques or a collection of technologies but also an idea that resonates throughout contemporary culture. He addresses a wide array of subjects, including film representations of computing (Desk Set, The Social Network), Neal Stephenson’s famous open source manifesto, J. K. Rowling’s legal battle with a fan site, the sorting of digital libraries, subscription services like Netflix, and the Apple versus Google debate over openness in computing. Punday shows how contemporary authors are caught between traditional notions of writerly authority and computing’s emphasis on doing things with writing. What does it mean to be a writer today? Is writing code for an app equivalent to writing a novel? Should we change how we teach writing? Punday’s answers to these questions and others are original and refreshing, and push the study of digital media in productive new directions.

The Science Fiction Reboot

Author: Heather Urbanski
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 147660164X
Size: 74.72 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 4332
Download and Read
This analysis examines several recent reimagined science fiction franchises (Star Trek, Battlestar Galactica, V, and Star Wars) in order to capture how “reboots” work from a fan perspective. Previous encounters with these stories make the reboot experience distinct for fan-viewers, who bring with them a set of expectations and knowledge, often tied to franchise canon that cannot be separated from the new film or television series. Even when elements of the original versions are maintained, memories of them influence the narrative encounter. This book considers reimagined texts from several levels, including the medium, the characters, and the world building, to break down and then explore the reboot experience.

Medieval Afterlives In Contemporary Culture

Author: Gail Ashton
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 144116068X
Size: 76.52 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 2053
Download and Read
With contributions from 29 leading international scholars, this is the first single-volume guide to the appropriation of medieval texts in contemporary culture. Medieval Afterlives in Contemporary Culture covers a comprehensive range of media, including literature, film, TV, comics book adaptations, electronic media, performances, and commercial merchandise and tourism. Its lively chapters range from Spamalot to the RSC, Beowulf to Merlin, computer games to internet memes, opera to Young Adult fiction and contemporary poetry, and much more. Also included is a companion website aimed at general readers, academics, and students interested in the burgeoning field of Medieval afterlives, complete with: - Further reading/weblinks - 'My favourite' guides to contemporary medieval appropriations - Images and interviews - Guide to library archives and manuscript collections - Guide to heritage collection See also our website at https://medievalafterlives.wordpress.com/.

Fans Bloggers And Gamers

Author: Henry Jenkins
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 9780814743102
Size: 78.69 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 4301
Download and Read
Henry Jenkins at [email protected] (video) Henry Jenkins“s pioneering work in the early 1990s promoted the idea that fans are among the most active, creative, critically engaged, and socially connected consumers of popular culture and that they represent the vanguard of a new relationship with mass media. Though marginal and largely invisible to the general public at the time, today, media producers and advertisers, not to mention researchers and fans, take for granted the idea that the success of a media franchise depends on fan investments and participation. Bringing together the highlights of a decade and a half of groundbreaking research into the cultural life of media consumers, Fans, Bloggers, and Gamers takes readers from Jenkins's progressive early work defending fan culture against those who would marginalize or stigmatize it, through to his more recent work, combating moral panic and defending Goths and gamers in the wake of the Columbine shootings. Starting with an interview on the current state of fan studies, this volume maps the core theoretical and methodological issues in Fan Studies. It goes on to chart the growth of participatory culture on the web, take up blogging as perhaps the most powerful illustration of how consumer participation impacts mainstream media, and debate the public policy implications surrounding participation and intellectual property.

Race After The Internet

Author: Lisa Nakamura
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135965749
Size: 26.47 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 452
Download and Read
"Digital media technologies like the Internet create and host the social networks, virtual worlds, online communities, and media texts where it was once thought that we would all be the same, anonymous users with infinite powers. Instead, the essays in Race After the Internet show us that the Internet and other computer-based technologies are complex topographies of power and privilege, made up of walled gardens, new (plat)forms of economic and technological exclusion, and both new and old styles of race as code, interaction, and image. Investigating how racialization and racism are changing in web 2.0 digital media culture, Race After the Internet contains interdisciplinary essays on the shifting terrain of racial identity and its connections to digital media, including Facebook and MySpace, YouTube and viral video, WiFi infrastructure, the One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) program, genetic ancestry testing, DNA databases in health and law enforcement, and popular online games like World of Warcraft. Ultimately, the collection broadens the definition of the "digital divide" in order to convey a more nuanced understanding of usage, meaning, participation, and production of digital media technology in light of racial inequality."--