Download writing in the disciplines building supportive cultures for student writing in uk higher education in pdf or read writing in the disciplines building supportive cultures for student writing in uk higher education in pdf online books in PDF, EPUB and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to get writing in the disciplines building supportive cultures for student writing in uk higher education in pdf book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want.



Writing In The Disciplines

Author: Christine Hardy
Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing
ISBN: 178052546X
Size: 58.28 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 1140
Download and Read
This book develops academic writing in higher education. Viewing writing as a complex sociocultural act, it analyses key issues in writing environments and their impact on student writing. Drawing on research, practice and the existing body of knowledge, it also offers practical writing activities that can be used with students in the disciplines.

Developing Generic Support For Doctoral Students

Author: Susan Carter
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317698509
Size: 71.57 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 2618
Download and Read
This multidisciplinary, multi-voiced book looks at the practice and pedagogy of generic, across-campus support for doctoral students. With a global imperative for increased doctoral completions, universities around the world are providing more generic support. This book represents collegial cross-fertilisation focussed on generic pedagogy, provided by contributors who are practitioners working and researching at the pan-disciplinary level which complements supervision. In the UK, funding for two weeks annual training in transferable skills for each doctoral scholarship recipient has caused an explosion of such teaching, which is now flourishing elsewhere too; for example, endorsed by the Carnegie Initiative on the Doctorate in the USA and developed extensively in Australia. Generic doctoral support is expanding, yet is a relatively new kind of teaching, practised extensively only in the last decade and with its own ethical, practical and pedagogical complexities. These raise a number of questions: How is generic support funded and situated within institutions? Should some sessions be compulsory for doctoral students? Where do the boundaries lie between what can be taught generically or left to supervisors as discipline-specific? To what extent is generic work pastoral? What are its main benefits? Its challenges? Its objectives? Over the last two decades supervision has been investigated and theorised as a teaching practice, a discussion this book extends to generic doctoral support. This edited book has contributions from a wide range of authors and includes short inset narratives from academic authorities, accumulatively enabling discussion of practice and the establishment of a benchmark for this growing topic.

Academics Engaging With Student Writing

Author: Jackie Tuck
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317358902
Size: 72.59 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 960
Download and Read
Student writing has long been viewed as a problem in higher education in the UK. Moreover, the sector has consistently performed poorly in the National Student Survey with regard to assessment and feedback. Academics Engaging with Student Writing tackles these major issues from a new and unique angle, exploring the real-life experiences of academic teachers from different institutions as they set, support, read, respond to and assess assignments undertaken by undergraduate students. Incorporating evidence from post-1992 universities, Oxbridge, members of the Russell Group and others, this book examines working practices around student writing within the context of an increasingly market-oriented mass higher education system. Presenting a wealth of relevant examples from disciplines as diverse as History and Sports Science, Tuck makes extensive use of interviews, observations, texts and audio recordings in order to explore the perspectives of academic teachers who work with student writers and their texts. This book will be of interest to researchers, academics and postgraduate students in the fields of academic literacies, higher education, language and literacy, language in higher education, English for academic purposes and assessment. Furthermore, academic teachers with experience of this crucial aspect of academic labour will welcome Tuck’s pioneering work as an indispensable tool for making sense of their own engagement with student writers.

Enhancing Teaching Practice In Higher Education

Author: Helen Pokorny
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 1473927358
Size: 52.35 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 5486
Download and Read
Lecturers, download your inspection copy here. This book explores ways in which pedagogical research, theory, models and frameworks can be used pragmatically to enhance teaching practice in higher education. It provides practical strategies, ideas, techniques and approaches drawn from literature and real-life experience, using examples from a variety of disciplines. Cross-cutting themes include developing resilience and care for ourselves, our colleagues and our students, engaging with diversity in teaching and promoting dialogue and enquiry. It also addresses the dimensions of the UK Professional Standards Framework. Key coverage includes: Models of course and learning design and evaluation Teaching in different contexts including lectures and small groups, laboratory, studio and practice settings and supervising student research Enhancing assessment and feedback, student engagement and academic writing through inclusive practice Promoting participation in blended learning Developing students’ work-relevant skills, attributes and practices Approaches to professional development including the role of mindfulness in teaching This is essential reading for lecturers on Higher Education Academy-accredited programmes, such as PGCTLHE, PGCAP, PG Cert HE, and for staff seeking HEA fellowship through experience-based routes, or who wish to develop more scholarly approaches to their practice.

Writing Centres In Higher Education

Author: Laura Dison
Publisher: AFRICAN SUN MeDIA
ISBN: 1928357547
Size: 16.32 MB
Format: PDF
View: 4733
Download and Read
Writing Centres in South Africa, and globally, are now well established academic support centres within many universities. Historically tasked with supporting students as they grapple with the demands of academic writing, many centres are now moving beyond their own walls to work with academic tutors, lecturers and departments to rethink the ways in which knowledge is transformed into different kinds of disciplinary writing. This move raises pertinent questions for writing centre directors, tutors/consultants, and for the universities that house them: how does a centre, tasked with supporting more general academic literacy development through writing pedagogies, initiate students into a range of particularised discourse communities? How do writing centre staff and disciplinary lecturers negotiate their shared, and separate, concerns for student learning through collaborative writing development projects? How do writing centres work with assignments and forms of literacy that challenge them to reconfigure their own pedagogical practices and expand their conceptions of writing support? How do writing centres maintain their core focus as they move flexibly beyond their own spaces to understand the nature of disciplinary writing? This collection of essays reflects on the ways in which writing centres in South Africa are working in and across disciplines. Institutional constraints and challenges that arise from these collaborations are addressed and opportunities for transforming teaching and learning spaces are explored. The chapters speak to the global move in higher education to reconsider how knowledge is made, who makes it, and how support and development opportunities for students and lecturers should be created and sustained across the disciplines. This volume contributes to the body of knowledge in the growing field of the scholarship of teaching and learning in higher education in South Africa. It builds on the work of the first collection of such essays: Changing Spaces: Writing Centres and Access to Higher Education (Eds. A. Archer and R. Richards, 2011, SUN PReSS) to understand why working within the disciplines is so critical for writing development in a South African context.

Writing In Social Spaces

Author: Rowena Murray
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317627121
Size: 52.67 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 943
Download and Read
Writing in Social Spaces addresses the problem of making time and space for writing in academic life and work of the professionals and practitioners who do academic writing'. Even those who want to write, who know how to write well and who have quality publications, report that they cannot find enough time for writing. Many supervisors are unsure about how to help postgraduates improve their writing for thesis and publication. Whilst the problem does presents through concerns with ‘time’, it is also partly about writing practices, academic identities and lack of motivation. This book provides a research-based, theorised approach to the skill of writing whilst retaining a link to writing practices and giving immediate yet sustainable solutions to the writing problem. It supplies new theory and practice on: socializing writing-in-progress and writing with others exploring the alternation of conscious and unconscious, internal and external processes in academic writing whilst in a social grouping Applying social processes in the writing process Using case studies and vignettes of writing in social spaces to illustrate the theory in practice, This book is a valuable resource for academics, scholars, professionals and practitioners, as well as researchers at all stages of their career, and in all disciplines.

Changing Spaces

Author: Arlene Archer
Publisher: AFRICAN SUN MeDIA
ISBN: 1920338594
Size: 73.37 MB
Format: PDF
View: 6271
Download and Read
Changing Spaces makes a forceful and credible case for the role of writing centres in engaging with students, staff and institutional structures in understanding issues of access from a social perspective ... This is a specialist book for those working in writing centres and for academics of all disciplines. It is based on research and provides an important set of theoretical arguments, developed through reflection on writing centre practices, about student writing and the work of the university. Professor Sioux McKenna Centre for Higher Education Research, Teaching and Learning, Rhodes University How do we select and train tutors? How do we work with faculty? How do we combat the image that we are remedial, a ‘fix-it’ shop? How do we prove our worth? How do we show that we improve retention? ... Changing Spaces demonstrates the flexibility of writing centers and the unique roles they play in South Africa. Writing centers everywhere represent institutional responses to the learning needs of their students, and they do so because writing centers adapt easily to different contexts and situations. They meet students where they are, as a group and individually. Professor Leigh Ryan Writing Center Director, University of Maryland, USA

How People Learn

Author: National Research Council
Publisher: National Academies Press
ISBN: 0309131979
Size: 57.97 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 7250
Download and Read
First released in the Spring of 1999, How People Learn has been expanded to show how the theories and insights from the original book can translate into actions and practice, now making a real connection between classroom activities and learning behavior. This edition includes far-reaching suggestions for research that could increase the impact that classroom teaching has on actual learning. Like the original edition, this book offers exciting new research about the mind and the brain that provides answers to a number of compelling questions. When do infants begin to learn? How do experts learn and how is this different from non-experts? What can teachers and schools do-with curricula, classroom settings, and teaching methods--to help children learn most effectively? New evidence from many branches of science has significantly added to our understanding of what it means to know, from the neural processes that occur during learning to the influence of culture on what people see and absorb. How People Learn examines these findings and their implications for what we teach, how we teach it, and how we assess what our children learn. The book uses exemplary teaching to illustrate how approaches based on what we now know result in in-depth learning. This new knowledge calls into question concepts and practices firmly entrenched in our current education system. Topics include: How learning actually changes the physical structure of the brain. How existing knowledge affects what people notice and how they learn. What the thought processes of experts tell us about how to teach. The amazing learning potential of infants. The relationship of classroom learning and everyday settings of community and workplace. Learning needs and opportunities for teachers. A realistic look at the role of technology in education.

Teaching Academic Writing In Uk Higher Education

Author: Lisa Ganobcsik-Williams
Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education
ISBN: 0230208584
Size: 37.70 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 5931
Download and Read
Academic Writing is emerging as a distinct subject for teaching and research in higher education in the UK and elsewhere. Teaching Academic Writing in UK Higher Education introduces this growing field and provides a resource for university teachers, researchers and administrators interested in developing students' writing.