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A History Of The World In Twelve Maps

Author: Jerry Brotton
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 1846145708
Size: 29.12 MB
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Jerry Brotton is the presenter of the acclaimed BBC4 series 'Maps: Power, Plunder and Possession'. Here he tells the story of our world through maps. Throughout history, maps have been fundamental in shaping our view of the world, and our place in it. But far from being purely scientific objects, world maps are unavoidably ideological and subjective, intimately bound up with the systems of power and authority of particular times and places. Mapmakers do not simply represent the world, they construct it out of the ideas of their age. In this scintillating book, Jerry Brotton examines the significance of 12 maps - from the mystical representations of ancient history to the satellite-derived imagery of today. He vividly recreates the environments and circumstances in which each of the maps was made, showing how each conveys a highly individual view of the world - whether the Jerusalem-centred Christian perspective of the 14th century Hereford Mappa Mundi or the Peters projection of the 1970s which aimed to give due weight to 'the third world'. Although the way we map our surroundings is once more changing dramatically, Brotton argues that maps today are no more definitive or objective than they have ever been - but that they continue to make arguments and propositions about the world, and to recreate, shape and mediate our view of it. Readers of this book will never look at a map in quite the same way again.

A History Of The World In 12 Maps

Author: Jerry Brotton
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101637994
Size: 13.48 MB
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A New York Times Bestseller “Maps allow the armchair traveler to roam the world, the diplomat to argue his points, the ruler to administer his country, the warrior to plan his campaigns and the propagandist to boost his cause… rich and beautiful.” – Wall Street Journal Throughout history, maps have been fundamental in shaping our view of the world, and our place in it. But far from being purely scientific objects, maps of the world are unavoidably ideological and subjective, intimately bound up with the systems of power and authority of particular times and places. Mapmakers do not simply represent the world, they construct it out of the ideas of their age. In this scintillating book, Jerry Brotton examines the significance of 12 maps - from the almost mystical representations of ancient history to the satellite-derived imagery of today. He vividly recreates the environments and circumstances in which each of the maps was made, showing how each conveys a highly individual view of the world. Brotton shows how each of his maps both influenced and reflected contemporary events and how, by considering it in all its nuances and omissions, we can better understand the world that produced it. Although the way we map our surroundings is more precise than ever before, Brotton argues that maps today are no more definitive or objective than they have ever been. Readers of this beautifully illustrated and masterfully argued book will never look at a map in quite the same way again. “A fascinating and panoramic new history of the cartographer’s art.” – The Guardian “The intellectual background to these images is conveyed with beguiling erudition…. There is nothing more subversive than a map.” – The Spectator “A mesmerizing and beautifully illustrated book.” —The Telegraph From the Trade Paperback edition.

A History Of Britain In 12 Maps

Author: Philip Parker
Publisher: Michael Joseph
ISBN: 9780241368268
Size: 30.68 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Pre-order this fascinating analysis of a dozen maps selected from critical points in the last two thousand years of British history. With the uncertainty of Brexit looming, Britain as we know it is on the brink of defining change. With current borders being disputed and, with them, identities challenged, this book will provide a brilliant insight into how our country's borders have always been, and always will be, in a state of change. From the Celtic period when 'Britain' was just a patchwork of tribal kingdoms; to the height of the empire a century ago, when the whole of Ireland, India, Australia, much of Africa, Asia and the Americas were marked as British; through to the present-day when Britain's shape and extent is once more in question, these maps dramatically chart the political and cultural evolution of the nation. By focusing on these maps Philip Parker reveals how Britain came to be the way it is today, and how the past is a guide to where we might go from here.

Vital Witnesses

Author: Mark Newman
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1475810547
Size: 68.71 MB
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The strong push to use primary sources in teaching history and social studies creates a need among teachers for more information on what they are and how they can be used effectively in the classroom. Vital Witnesses meets this need by providing teachers with a comprehensive guide to primary sources and their use in the classroom.

Medieval Islamic Maps

Author: Karen C. Pinto
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022612701X
Size: 14.11 MB
Format: PDF
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Hundreds of exceptional cartographic images are scattered throughout medieval and early modern Arabic, Persian, and Turkish manuscript collections. The plethora of copies created around the Islamic world over the course of eight centuries testifies to the enduring importance of these medieval visions for the Muslim cartographic imagination. With Medieval Islamic Maps, historian Karen C. Pinto brings us the first in-depth exploration of medieval Islamic cartography from the mid-tenth to the nineteenth century. Pinto focuses on the distinct tradition of maps known collectively as the Book of Roads and Kingdoms (Kitab al-Masalik wa al-Mamalik, or KMMS), examining them from three distinct angles—iconography, context, and patronage. She untangles the history of the KMMS maps, traces their inception and evolution, and analyzes them to reveal the identities of their creators, painters, and patrons, as well as the vivid realities of the social and physical world they depicted. In doing so, Pinto develops innovative techniques for approaching the visual record of Islamic history, explores how medieval Muslims perceived themselves and their world, and brings Middle Eastern maps into the forefront of the study of the history of cartography.

A History Of Spaces

Author: John Pickles
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135104913
Size: 63.46 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This book provides an essential insight into the practices and ideas of maps and map-making. It draws on a wide range of social theorists, and theorists of maps and cartography, to show how maps and map-making have shaped the spaces in which we live. Going beyond the focus of traditional cartography, the book draws on examples of the use of maps from the sixteenth century to the present, including their role in projects of the national and colonial state, emergent capitalism and the planetary consciousness of the natural sciences. It also considers the use of maps for military purposes, maps that have coded modern conceptions of health, disease and social character, and maps of the transparent human body and the transparent earth.

Mapping The World

Author: Ralph E. Ehrenberg
Publisher: Natl Geographic Society
ISBN:
Size: 66.59 MB
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Mapping the World is a one-of-a-kind collection of cartographic treasures spanning thousands of years and many cultures, from an ancient Babylonian map of the world etched on clay to the latest high-tech maps of the earth, the seas, and the skies above. With more than one hundred maps and other illustrations and an introduction and commentary by Ralph E. Ehrenberg, former Chief of the Geography and Map Division of the Library of Congress, this book tells a fascinating story of geographic discovery, scientific invention, the art of mapmaking, and the efforts of mapmakers everywhere to render our shape-shifting world in ever more innovative and meaningful ways. The book draws from the finest map collections in the world, including the libraries of the National Geographic Society, the Library of Congress, and the British Library, and is organized into several chronological sections. Each section includes a brief introduction that places the maps in their historical context, followed by a gallery of cartographic masterpieces from different parts of the world, giving readers a unique comparative perspective on the state of geographic knowledge and mapmaking during different historical periods. Special "portfolios" within each section feature key cartographic innovators and maps of exceptional artistic quality or significance, such as the Waldseemuller Map, the first to use the name America; or the life and work of a groundbreaking cartographer, such as Gerardus Mercator, who gave us the Mercator projection; or the latest computer-generated maps that open new windows on the cosmos. In addition to including examples of all the world's most prized and famous maps of exploration and discovery, the book features many other examples of maps that rarely get the attention they deserve---geological maps, road maps, prisoner escape maps, tourist maps, city maps, military situation maps, mental maps, and much more. With its broad historical and cultural range, unmatched variety of maps from many of the finest map collections in the world, more than one hundred illustrations, and a fresh and authoritative perspective on the history of cartography, Mapping the World will delight everyone with an interest in maps and mapmaking like no other book on the subject.

Mapping And Naming The Moon

Author: Ewen A. Whitaker
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521544146
Size: 39.47 MB
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Almost 30 years after the Apollo missions, 'Tranquillity Base', 'Hadley Rille', or 'Taurus-Littrow' are names still resonant with the enormous achievements represented by the lunar landings. But how did these places get their names? Who named Copernicus Crater? Where did all those names on lunar maps come from, and what stimulated their selection? Ewen Whitaker traces the origins and evolution of the present-day systems for naming lunar features, such as craters, mountains, valleys and dark spots. The connections between the prehistoric and historic names, and today's gazetteer are clearly described. Beautiful lunar maps spanning four centuries of progress wonderfully illustrate the unfolding of our ability to map the Moon. Rare, early, photographs add to the sense of history. Comprehensive appendices and the bibliography make this delightful book a work of lasting reference and scholarship.

Europe

Author: Norman Davies
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780198201717
Size: 75.30 MB
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From the Ice Age to the Cold War and beyond, from Reykjavik to Riga, from Archimedes to Einstein, Alexander to Yeltsin, here between the covers of a single volume Norman Davies tells the story of Europe, East and West, from prehistory to the present day. The book's absorbing narrative lays down the chronological and geographical grid on which the dramas of European history have been played out. It zooms in from the distant focus of Chapter One, which explores the first five million years of the continent's evolution, to the close focus of the lasttwo chapters, which cover the twentieth century at roughly one page per year. In between, Norman Davies presents a huge and sweeping canvas packed with fascinating detail, analysis, and anecdote. Alongside Europe's better-known stories - human, national, and continental - he brings into focus areasoften ignored or misunderstood, remembering the stateless nation as well as the nation-state. Minority communities, from heretics and lepers to Jews, Romanies, and Muslims have not been forgotten. This masterly history reveals not only the rich variety of Europe's past but also the many and rewarding prisms through which it can be viewed. Each chapter contains a selection of telephoto `capsules', illustrating narrower themes and topics that cut across the chronological flow. Davies thenconcludes with a wide-angle `snapshot' of the whole continent as seen from one particular vantage point. The overall effect is stunning: a kind of historical picture album, with panoramic tableaux interspersed by detailed insets and close-ups. Never before has such an ambitious history of Europe been attempted. In range and ambition, the originality of its structure and glittering style, Norman Davies's Europe represents one of the most important and illuminating history books to be published by Oxford. Time Capsules 201 fascinating articles interspersed throughout the narrative focus on incidents or topics as various as The Iceman of the Alps, Erotic Graffiti at Pompeii, Stradivarius, and Psychoanalysing Hitler. Each capsule can be tasted as a separate self-contained morsel; or can be read in conjunction withthe narrative into which it is inserted. Snapshots 12 panoramic overviews across the changing map of Europe freeze the frames of the chronological narrative at moments of symbolic importance, such as Knossos 1628 BC, Constantinople AD 330, and Nuremberg 1945. A fully illustrated history Incorporates over 100 superbly detailed maps and diagrams, and 32 pages of black and white plates.

The Sale Of The Late King S Goods

Author: Jerry Brotton
Publisher: Pan
ISBN: 9781509865277
Size: 41.86 MB
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Set against the backdrop of war, revolution, and regicide, and moving from London to Venice, Mantua, Madrid, Paris and the Low Countries, Jerry Brotton's colourful and critically acclaimed book, The Sale of the Late King's Goods, explores the formation and dispersal of King Charles I's art collection. Following a remarkable and unprecedented Parliamentary Act for 'The sale of the late king's goods', Cromwell's republican regime sold off nearly 2,000 paintings, tapestries, statues and drawings in an attempt to settle the dead king's enormous debts and raise money for the Commonwealth's military forces. Brotton recreates the extraordinary circumstances of this sale, in which for the first time ordinary working people were able to handle and own works by the great masters. He also examines the abiding relationship between art and power, revealing how the current Royal Collection emerged from this turbulent period, and paints its own vivid and dramatic picture of one of the greatest lost collections in English history.