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Blood Red Snow

Author: Gunter Koschorrek
Publisher: Frontline Books
ISBN: 1848325967
Size: 67.51 MB
Format: PDF
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Günter Koschorrek wrote his illicit diary on any scraps of paper he could lay his hands on, storing them with his mother on infrequent trips home on leave. The diary went missing, and it was not until he was reunited with his daughter in America some forty years later that it came to light and became Blood Red Snow. The author’s excitement at the first encounter with the enemy in the Russian Steppe is obvious. Later, the horror and confusion of fighting in the streets of Stalingrad are brought to life by his descriptions of the others in his unit – their differing manners and techniques for dealing with the squalor and death. He is also posted to Romania and Italy, assignments he remembers fondly compared to his time on the Eastern Front. This book stands as a memorial to the huge numbers on both sides who did not survive and is, some six decades later, the fulfilment of a responsibility the author feels to honour the memory of those who perished.

The Myth Of The Eastern Front

Author: Ronald Smelser
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521833655
Size: 80.23 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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Some Americans are receptive to a positive interpretation of German military conduct on the Russian front in World War II.

Muskoka Terror G8

Author: Martin Avery
Publisher: Lulu.com
ISBN: 0557519594
Size: 61.16 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 1937
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It's a page-turner with a mystery and a whodunnit wrapped in a thriller, with Nazis, Communists, Norman Bethune and Tom Thompson in the middle, and it becomes a psychological horror, that's funny, fun, and has a surprise ending that is oddly satisfying and will stay with you forever.

The Second World War On The Eastern Front

Author: Lee Baker
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317865030
Size: 66.90 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Russia's engagement with Germany on the Eastern Front during World War II was ferocious, unprecedented and bloody, costing millions of civilian and military lives. In this challenging new book, Lee Baker distinguishes myth from reality and deflates the idea that this war, while gargantuan in scale, was in essence a war like any other.

The Dictators

Author: R. J. Overy
Publisher: Allan Lane
ISBN:
Size: 74.29 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Half a century after their deaths, the dictatorships of Stalin and Hitler still cast a long and terrible shadow over the modern world. They were the most destructive and lethal regimes in history, murdering millions. They fought the largest and costliest war in all history. Yet millions of Germans and Russians enthusiastically supported them and the values they stood for. In this first major study of the two dictatorships side-by-side Richard Overy sets out to answer the question: How was dictatorship possible? How did they function? What was the bond that tied dictator and people so powerfully together? He paints a remarkable and vivid account of the different ways in which Stalin and Hitler rose to power, and abused and dominated their people. It is a chilling analysis of powerful ideals corrupted by the vanity of ambitious and unscrupulous men.

Mud

Author: C. E. Wood
Publisher: Potomac Books Incorporated
ISBN: 9781597970037
Size: 65.48 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Napoleon delayed his attack at Waterloo to allow the mud to dry. Had he attacked earlier, he might have defeated Wellington before Blücher arrived. In November 1942, Russian mud stopped the Germans, who could not advance again until the temperature dropped low enough to freeze the mud. During the Vietnam War, “Project Popeye” was an American attempt to lengthen the monsoon and cause delays on the Ho Chi Minh Trail. Soldiers have always known just how significant mud can be in war. But historians have not fully recognized its importance, and few have discussed the phenomenon in more than a passing manner. Only three books—Military Geography (by John Collins), Battling the Elements (by Harold Winters et al.), and Battlegrounds) (edited by Michael Stephenson)— have addressed it at any length and then only as part of the entire environment’s effect on the battlefield. None of these books analyzed mud’s influence on the individual combatant. Mud: A Military History first defines the substance’s very different types. Then it examines their specific effects on mobility and on soldiers and their equipment over the centuries and throughout the world. From the Russian rasputiza to the Southeast Asian monsoon, C. E. Wood demonstrates mud’s profound impact on the course of military history. Citing numerous veterans’ memoirs, archival sources, personal interviews, and historical sources, soldier-scholar Wood pays particular attention to mud’s effect on combatants’ morale, health, and fatigue. His book is for all infantrymen—past, present, or the clean, dry, comfortable armchair variety.

Cracking The Luftwaffe Codes

Author: Gwen Watkins
Publisher: Greenhill Books/Lionel Leventhal
ISBN:
Size: 46.73 MB
Format: PDF
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Bletchley Park, or Station X, was home to the most famous codebreakers of the Second World War. The 19th century mansion was the key center for cracking German, Italian and Japanese codes, providing the allies with vital information. After the war, many intercepts, traffic-slips and paperwork were burned (allegedly at Churchill's behest). The truth about Bletchley was not revealed until F. Winterbotham's The Ultra Secret was published in 1974. Against seemingly insurmountable odds, codebreakers including Alan Turing, Gordon Welchman and Jim Rose had devised methods to allow them to read enemy codes, often within hours of the messages being received. New technology was invented to automate the deciphering of messages. Colossus, the world's first semi-programmable computer was invented at Bletchley to aid the decoding of Lorenz ciphers, used by the German High Command to send their most highly-classified and importantßcommunications. The codebreakers also had tremendous success in defeating the Luftwaffe's AuKa codes. In The Secrets of Bletchley, former WAAF (Women's Auxiliary Air Force) Gwen Watkins brings to life the reality of the German Air Section. Her memoir is the first account of this crucial division. In a highly informative, lyrical account, she details her eventful interview, eventual appointment at the µthe biggest lunatic asylum in Britain', methods for cracking codes, the day-to-day routine and decommisioning of her section. Lord Asa Briggs is a renowned historian who also served at Bletchley Park.