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China And North Korea

Author: C. Freeman
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137455667
Size: 65.78 MB
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At a time when Chinese policy makers appear to be rethinking China's historically close alliance relationship with North Korea, this volume gathers a diverse collection of original essays by some of China's leading experts on North Korea and China's North Korea policy.

China And North Korea

Author: U. S. Military
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781983165504
Size: 46.34 MB
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Various nations in the international domain speculate that China alone has enough leverage to compel North Korea into giving up its nuclear weapons. However, China claims that its influence over North Korea is limited. Although China remains North Korea's most important ally, their relationship often has been categorized as complex and ambiguous, as both countries are driven by a shared history of succumbing to foreign aggression. Some argue that historical events led the two countries to become estranged rather than to become strong allies. Conversely, others contend that the history between China and North Korea drives both countries to maintain an enduring alliance. Therefore, this study answers the question: Does China alone possess enough leverage to have major influence on North Korea's behavior? Through analysis of China and North Korea's alliance formation, the first and second nuclear crises, and the Six Party Talks, this study contends that China alone does not have enough leverage to alter North Korea's behavior because diplomatic ties are not as close as some may believe. Therefore, the international community should cooperate with China so that influence may be gained over North Korea's behavior. I. INTRODUCTION * A. MAJOR RESEARCH QUESTION * B. SIGNIFICANCE * C. LITERATURE REVIEW * 1. Why Alliances Form * 2. Great Power-Small Power Alliances * 3. China and North Korea's Alliance Behavior * D. POTENTIAL EXPLANATIONS AND HYPOTHESES * 1. Hypothesis 1: Maintaining Stability and Limiting Outside Influence Matters More than Using Leverage * 2. Hypothesis 2: China Will Leverage If North Korea's Actions Cause Destabilization * 3. Hypothesis 3: North Korea Will Become More Defiant If China Allows Outside Threats to Disrupt their Alliance * E. RESEARCH DESIGN * F. THESIS OVERVIEW AND CHAPTER OUTLINE * II. BLOOD OR WATER? * A. INTRODUCTION * B. NORTH KOREA: UNITY UNDER ITS TERMS * C. CHINA: A WAR FAR FROM FORGOTTEN * D. CHINA AND NORTH KOREA: BREAKING AWAY FROM THE SOVIET'S STRONGHOLD * E. CONCLUSION: POWER BEFORE FRIENDSHIP * III. NUCLEAR PURSUIT AND NUCLEAR DEFIANCE * A. INTRODUCTION * B. THE NUCLEAR CHASE * C. THE NORTH'S EXPOSURE * D. CHINA AND THE FIRST NUCLEAR CRISIS * E. THE NORTH'S SECOND EXPOSURE * F. CHINA AND THE SECOND NUCLEAR CRISIS * G. CONCLUSION: CHINA'S POLITICAL LEVERAGE VERSUS NORTH KOREA'S DEFIANCE * IV. NUKES, NEGOTIATIONS, AND THE PRICE OF BARGAINING * A. INTRODUCTION * B. CHINA AND NORTH KOREA'S INTERESTS IN THE SIX PARTY TALKS * C. ROUND ONE: REFUSALS TO BUDGE * D. ROUND TWO: NORTH KOREA MAKES THE FIRST MOVE * E. ROUND THREE: GETTING NOWHERE FAST * F. CONTINUED CLASHES AND FAILED DIPLOMACY * G. CONCLUSION: THE PRICE OF BARGAINING IS REASSURANCE * V. UNDERSTANDING THE CHINA AND NORTH KOREA LEVERAGE DILEMMA * A. INTRODUCTION * 1. The China and North Korea Alliance Arises * 2. North Korea's Nuclear Achievement and China's Worst Fear * 3. Multinational Efforts and North Korea's Defiance * B. SIGNIFICANCE OF THE CHINA AND NORTH KOREA LEVERAGE DILEMMA * C. CONCLUSION: RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE CHINA AND NORTH KOREA LEVERAGE DILEMMA

China S Role In North Korea Contingencies Pla And Diplomatic Reactions To Nuclear Conflict Geopolitical And Security Implications For The United States Possible Massive Refugee Flows Into China

Author: Senate of the United States of America
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781080546879
Size: 55.76 MB
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This important report compilation of testimony at a 2018 roundtable examined Chinese views on the likelihood of various potential North Korean contingencies, how China could play a role in the lead-up to or unfolding of such contingencies, and implications for the United States and the region. This roundtable explored the following: (1) Chinese thinking about potential crises and contingencies involving North Korea; (2) what the People's Liberation Army (PLA) and other stakeholders are doing to prepare for these various scenarios; (3) Chinese diplomatic activities in this area; and (4) geopolitical and security implications for the United States.This compilation includes a reproduction of the 2019 Worldwide Threat Assessment of the U.S. Intelligence Community.Content: Panel Introduction by Senator James Talent (Roundtable Co-Chair) * 1. Carla Freeman, Ph.D. Associate Research Professor and Director of the Foreign Policy Institute, Johns Hopkins University, School of Advanced International Studies * 2. Oriana Skylar Mastro, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Security Studies, Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University and Jeane Kirkpatrick Scholar, American Enterprise Institute * 3. Yun Sun, Co-Director of the East Asia Program and Director of the China Program, Stimson CenterTensions remain high on the Korean peninsula following last year's series of nuclear and missile tests by North Korea. Recent diplomatic efforts including President Trump's decision to hold a summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un and Kim's meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping in Beijing present an opportunity--welcome--to deescalate tensions and find a negotiated solution to the crisis. However, the checkered history of nuclear diplomacy with North Korea should temper our expectations about the prospects for success. Even with the emerging diplomatic process, the potential for upheaval in the peninsula remains real. One question we'll explore today is what could happen that would cause a crisis? Although we cannot predict the future, understanding how a crisis could start will help us watch for signs of developing greater instability. Another issue that merits close examination is what could happen in the aftermath of a contingency in North Korea? What might the long-term political future of the Korean peninsula look like? Is it possible to achieve both denuclearization and stability given the competing the priorities of the United States, China, North Korea and South Korea? What about Japan and Russia? Forging a common vision that addresses the major concerns of all parties will pose a difficult challenge. If the North Korean regime does collapse, whether from its internal weakness or in the course of a conflict, the United States will have to secure American interests on the peninsula while minimizing the risks of armed conflict with China. Effective mechanisms for cooperation and deconfliction with Beijing could help reduce the likelihood of miscalculations that result in clashes between U.S. and Chinese military forces. The Commission will continue to watch the situation in North Korea closely as it constitutes a major issue in U.S.-China relations and threatens the stability of Northeast Asia.

A Misunderstood Friendship

Author: Zhihua Shen
Publisher: Studies of the Weatherhead East Asian Institute, Columbia University
ISBN: 9780231188265
Size: 16.86 MB
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Leading diplomatic historians Zhihua Shen and Yafeng Xia draw on previously untapped primary source materials to offer a unique account of the China-North Korean relationship, uncovering tensions and rivalries that shed new light on the ties between these two communist East Asian nations.

Diminishing China North Korea Exchanges

Author: Michael Pilger
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 44.49 MB
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This report seeks to quantify changes in the bilateral relationship between China and North Korea by examining hundreds of discrete exchanges between Chinese and North Korean officials as reported by the Director of National Intelligence Open Source Center (OSC) from January 2009 to December 2014. The authors categorized these exchanges by type (cultural, economics and trade, health, military, party-to-party, tourism, and science and technology) and by seniority of the participants (see Figure 1) and evaluated trends in these categories over time. Finally, this report assesses trends in China-North Korea exchanges in the context of overall China-North Korea bilateral relations.