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Hamilton Adams Jefferson

Author: Darren Staloff
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 9780809053568
Size: 14.75 MB
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The author compares the intellectual understanding of the Enlightenment of Alexander Hamilton, John Adams, and Thomas Jefferson, and shows how the personal experiences and regional cultural traditions of each man shaped his interpretation of that movement and how those ideals played into the birth of the new nation.

A Companion To John Adams And John Quincy Adams

Author: David Waldstreicher
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 0470655585
Size: 37.34 MB
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A Companion to John Adams and John Quincy Adams presents a collection of original historiographic essays contributed by leading historians that cover diverse aspects of the lives and politics of John and John Quincy Adams and their spouses, Abigail and Louisa Catherine. Features contributions from top historians and Adams’ scholars Considers sub-topics of interest such as John Adams’ role in the late 18th-century demise of the Federalists, both Adams’ presidencies and efforts as diplomats, religion, and slavery Includes two chapters on Abigail Adams and one on Louisa Adams

The Founding Fathers Reconsidered

Author: R. B. Bernstein
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199713622
Size: 58.48 MB
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Here is a vividly written and compact overview of the brilliant, flawed, and quarrelsome group of lawyers, politicians, merchants, military men, and clergy known as the "Founding Fathers"--who got as close to the ideal of the Platonic "philosopher-kings" as American or world history has ever seen. In The Founding Fathers Reconsidered, R. B. Bernstein reveals Washington, Franklin, Jefferson, Adams, Hamilton, and the other founders not as shining demigods but as imperfect human beings--people much like us--who nevertheless achieved political greatness. They emerge here as men who sought to transcend their intellectual world even as they were bound by its limits, men who strove to lead the new nation even as they had to defer to the great body of the people and learn with them the possibilities and limitations of politics. Bernstein deftly traces the dynamic forces that molded these men and their contemporaries as British colonists in North America and as intellectual citizens of the Atlantic civilization's Age of Enlightenment. He analyzes the American Revolution, the framing and adoption of state and federal constitutions, and the key concepts and problems--among them independence, federalism, equality, slavery, and the separation of church and state--that both shaped and circumscribed the founders' achievements as the United States sought its place in the world.

The Enlightenment History Documents And Key Questions

Author: William E. Burns
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1610698460
Size: 24.94 MB
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Based on the most recent scholarship, this book provides students and interested lay readers with a basic introduction to key facts and current controversies concerning the Enlightenment. • Provides the Enlightenment in various formats, thereby enabling students to better understand and fully appreciate its causes and effects • Develops critical thinking skills through the interplay of primary and secondary sources • Includes argumentative essays that showcase the diversity of informed opinions on the modern Enlightenment • Supports NCHS World History content standards for Era 6, Standard 2E

God Bless America

Author: Dean Coddington
Publisher: iUniverse
ISBN: 0595907768
Size: 77.49 MB
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"Carefully reviewing events from 1500 AD to 1830 AD, Coddington and Chapman provide a persuasive list of examples of how they believe God favorably intervened in the establishment of the United States. Regardless of whether you agree or disagree with their arguments, you will be amazed at the number of times the margin between victory and defeat was determined by factors totally outside human control." -C. Craig Williford, PhD, president, Denver Seminary With the deep division in the United States today over religion and politics, the question of religion's decisive role in shaping America's founding and heritage remains a pivotal one. Dean Coddington and Richard Chapman bring a unique and highly informative contribution to this ongoing dialogue by examining religion's influence on early American history through such tools as probability analysis. Coddington and Chapman question whether religion and a desire for independence worked together to establish and sustain early America. They explore the connection through their comprehensive summaries of the American Revolution, the first six presidencies, the Louisiana Purchase, and other historically significant events up until 1830. They also take a closer look at an often-overshadowed component in the equation: the first and second Great Awakenings, religious revivals that effectively changed America's culture. With detailed examples, documented evidence, and thoughtful conclusions, God Bless America is a powerful addition to the growing collection of literature on this controversial topic.

The Political Philosophy Of Alexander Hamilton

Author: Michael P. Federici
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 1421406608
Size: 50.40 MB
Format: PDF
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Devoted to the whole of Hamilton’s political writing, this accessible and teachable analysis makes clear the enormous influence Hamilton had on the development of American political and economic institutions and policies.

For Fear Of An Elective King

Author: Kathleen Bartoloni-Tuazon
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 0801471907
Size: 23.43 MB
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In the spring of 1789, within weeks of the establishment of the new federal government based on the U.S. Constitution, the Senate and House of Representatives fell into dispute regarding how to address the president. Congress, the press, and individuals debated more than thirty titles, many of which had royal associations and some of which were clearly monarchical. For Fear of an Elective King is Kathleen Bartoloni-Tuazon’s rich account of the title controversy and its meanings. The short, intense legislative phase and the prolonged, equally intense public phase animated and shaped the new nation’s broadening political community. Rather than simply reflecting an obsession with etiquette, the question challenged Americans to find an acceptable balance between power and the people’s sovereignty while assuring the country’s place in the Atlantic world. Bartoloni-Tuazon argues that the resolution of the controversy in favor of the modest title of "President" established the importance of recognition of the people's views by the president and evidence of modesty in the presidency, an approach to leadership that fledged the presidency’s power by not flaunting it. How the country titled the president reflected the views of everyday people, as well as the recognition by social and political elites of the irony that authority rested with acquiescence to egalitarian principles. The controversy’s outcome affirmed the republican character of the country’s new president and government, even as the conflict was the opening volley in increasingly partisan struggles over executive power. As such, the dispute is as relevant today as in 1789.

Declarations Of Dependence

Author: Gregory Downs
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 080787776X
Size: 26.17 MB
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In this highly original study, Gregory Downs argues that the most American of wars, the Civil War, created a seemingly un-American popular politics, rooted not in independence but in voluntary claims of dependence. Through an examination of the pleas and petitions of ordinary North Carolinians, Declarations of Dependence contends that the Civil War redirected, not destroyed, claims of dependence by exposing North Carolinians to the expansive but unsystematic power of Union and Confederate governments, and by loosening the legal ties that bound them to husbands, fathers, and masters. Faced with anarchy during the long reconstruction of government authority, people turned fervently to the government for protection and sustenance, pleading in fantastic, intimate ways for attention. This personalistic, or what Downs calls patronal, politics allowed for appeals from subordinate groups like freed blacks and poor whites, and also bound people emotionally to newly expanding postwar states. Downs's argument rewrites the history of the relationship between Americans and their governments, showing the deep roots of dependence, the complex impact of the Civil War upon popular politics, and the powerful role of Progressivism and segregation in submerging a politics of dependence that--in new form--rose again in the New Deal and persists today.

American Credo

Author: Michael Foley
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN:
Size: 32.26 MB
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If America has a claim to exceptionalism, 'American Credo' locates it in a little understood ability to engage in deep conflicts over political ideas, while at the same time reducing adversarial positions to legitimate derivatives of American history and development.

The Founding Fathers

Author: R. B. Bernstein
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0190273518
Size: 27.82 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The Founding Fathers is a concise, accessible overview of the brilliant, flawed, and quarrelsome group of lawyers, politicians, merchants, military men, and clergy known as "the Founding Fathers"--who got as close to the ideal of the Platonic "philosopher-kings" as American or world history has ever seen. R. B. Bernstein reveals Washington, Franklin, Jefferson, Adams, Hamilton, and the other founders not as shining demigods but as imperfect human beings--people much like us--who nevertheless achieved political greatness. They emerge here as men who sought to transcend their intellectual world even as they were bound by its limits, men who strove to lead the new nation even as they had to defer to the great body of the people and learn with them the possibilities and limitations of politics. Bernstein deftly traces the dynamic forces that molded these men and their contemporaries as British colonists in North America and as intellectual citizens of the Atlantic civilization's Age of Enlightenment. He analyzes the American Revolution, the framing and adoption of state and federal constitutions, and the key concepts and problems that both shaped and circumscribed the founders' achievements as the United States sought its place in the world. Finally, he charts the shifting reputations of the founders and examines the specific ways that interpreters of the Constitution have used the Founding Fathers. A masterly blend of old and new scholarship, brimming with apt description and insightful analysis, this book offers a digestible account of how the Founding Fathers were formed, what they did, and how generations of Americans have viewed them. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.