Download in the kingdom of ice the grand and terrible polar voyage of the uss jeannette in pdf or read in the kingdom of ice the grand and terrible polar voyage of the uss jeannette in pdf online books in PDF, EPUB and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to get in the kingdom of ice the grand and terrible polar voyage of the uss jeannette in pdf book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want.



In The Kingdom Of Ice

Author: Hampton Sides
Publisher: Oneworld Publications
ISBN: 1780745265
Size: 39.82 MB
Format: PDF
View: 1414
Download and Read
In 1879 the USS Jeanette set sail from San Francisco to cheering crowds and a frenzy of publicity. The ship and its crew, captained by the heroic George De Long, were heading for glory and the last unmapped area of the globe: the North Pole. But it was not long before the Jeanette was trapped in crushing pack ice. Amid the rush of water and the shrieks of breaking wooden boards, the crew found themselves marooned a thousand miles north of Siberia with only the barest supplies, facing a seemingly impossible trek across the endless ice. Battling everything from snow blindness and polar bears to ferocious storms and frosty labyrinths, the expedition battled madness and starvation as they desperately strove for survival. With twists and turns worthy of a thriller, In the Kingdom of Ice is a spellbinding tale of heroism and determination in the most unforgiving territory on Earth.

A Cold Welcome

Author: Sam White
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674971922
Size: 74.31 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 1228
Download and Read
When Europeans arrived in North America, the average global temperature had dropped to lows unseen in millennia and its effects—famine, starvation, desperation, and violence—were stark among colonists unprepared to fend for themselves. This history of the Little Ice Age in North America reminds us of the risks of a changing and unfamiliar climate.

Crossover Readers Advisory Maximize Your Collection To Meet Reader Satisfaction

Author: Jessica E. Moyer
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 144083847X
Size: 19.84 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 1000
Download and Read
Help maximize your existing collection with this browsable volume containing titles that serve double-duty with their appeal to both teens and adults and cover genres spanning crime novels, romance, horror, science fiction, and more. • Features annotations that focus on reader appeal factors • Provides lists of titles as well as tips for using them with readers • Considers the appeal of various genres to adults and young adults • Acknowledges format availability, including various digital formats

Custer S Trials

Author: T.J. Stiles
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 1101875844
Size: 49.97 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 4246
Download and Read
Winner of the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for History From the winner of two Pulitzer Prizes and a National Book Award, a brilliant biography of Gen. George Armstrong Custer that radically changes our view of the man and his turbulent times. In this magisterial biography, T. J. Stiles paints a portrait of Custer both deeply personal and sweeping in scope, proving how much of Custer’s legacy has been ignored. He demolishes Custer’s historical caricature, revealing a volatile, contradictory, intense person—capable yet insecure, intelligent yet bigoted, passionate yet self-destructive, a romantic individualist at odds with the institution of the military (he was court-martialed twice in six years). The key to understanding Custer, Stiles writes, is keeping in mind that he lived on a frontier in time. In the Civil War, the West, and many areas overlooked in previous biographies, Custer helped to create modern America, but he could never adapt to it. He freed countless slaves yet rejected new civil rights laws. He proved his heroism but missed the dark reality of war for so many others. A talented combat leader, he struggled as a manager in the West. He tried to make a fortune on Wall Street yet never connected with the new corporate economy. Native Americans fascinated him, but he could not see them as fully human. A popular writer, he remained apart from Ambrose Bierce, Mark Twain, and other rising intellectuals. During Custer’s lifetime, Americans saw their world remade. His admirers saw him as the embodiment of the nation’s gallant youth, of all that they were losing; his detractors despised him for resisting a more complex and promising future. Intimate, dramatic, and provocative, this biography captures the larger story of the changing nation in Custer’s tumultuous marriage to his highly educated wife, Libbie; their complicated relationship with Eliza Brown, the forceful black woman who ran their household; as well as his battles and expeditions. It casts surprising new light on a near-mythic American figure, a man both widely known and little understood. From the Hardcover edition.