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Mayflower

Author: Nathaniel Philbrick
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9781101218839
Size: 58.18 MB
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"Vivid and remarkably fresh...Philbrick has recast the Pilgrims for the ages."--The New York Times Book Review Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in History New York Times Book Review Top Ten books of the Year How did America begin? That simple question launches the acclaimed author of In the Hurricane's Eye and Valiant Ambition on an extraordinary journey to understand the truth behind our most sacred national myth: the voyage of the Mayflower and the settlement of Plymouth Colony. As Philbrick reveals in this electrifying history of the Pilgrims, the story of Plymouth Colony was a fifty-five year epic that began in peril and ended in war. New England erupted into a bloody conflict that nearly wiped out the English colonists and natives alike. These events shaped the existing communites and the country that would grow from them.

Antidisestablishmentarianism

Author: Michael J. Findley
Publisher: Findley Family Video Publications
ISBN:
Size: 72.93 MB
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Politics, American History, Founding Fathers, Secular Humanism, Establishment Clause,Founding prinicples,Social Philosophy

Cengage Advantage Books American Government And Politics Today Brief Edition

Author: Steffen W. Schmidt
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 1305499042
Size: 58.21 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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AMERICAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS TODAY: BRIEF EDITION, 2016-2017, shows you how easily and effectively you can participate in the political process. New features, up-to-date political news and analysis, and a great price make this text a top seller. Praised for its succinct format, balanced coverage, clarity, and readability, this book examines all the key concepts of American government, while providing interesting student-oriented features that further convey what active citizenship means. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Journey Into America

Author: Akbar Ahmed
Publisher: Brookings Institution Press
ISBN: 9780815704409
Size: 71.45 MB
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Nearly seven million Muslims live in the United States today, and their relations with non-Muslims are strained. Many Americans associate Islam with figures such as Osama bin Laden, and they worry about “homegrown terrorists.” To shed light on this increasingly important religious group and counter mutual distrust, renowned scholar Akbar Ahmed conducted the most comprehensive study to date of the American Muslim community. Journey into America explores and documents how Muslims are fitting into U.S. society, placing their experience within the larger context of American identity. This eye-opening book also offers a fresh and insightful perspective on American history and society. Following up on his critically acclaimed Journey into Islam: The Crisis of Globalization (Brookings, 2007), Ahmed and his team of young researchers traveled for a year through more than seventyfive cities across the United States—from New York City to Salt Lake City; from Las Vegas to Miami; from the large Muslim enclave in Dearborn, Michigan, to small, predominantly white towns like Arab, Alabama. They visited homes, schools, and over one hundred mosques to discover what Muslims are thinking and how they are living every day in America. In this unprecedented exploration of American Muslim communities, Ahmed asked challenging questions: Can we expect an increase in homegrown terrorism? How do American Muslims ofArab descent differ from those of other origins (for example, Somalia or South Asia)? Why are so many white women converting to Islam? How can a Muslim become accepted fully as an “American,” and what does that mean? He also delves into the potentially sticky area of relations with other religions. For example, is there truly a deep divide between Muslims and Jews in America? And how well do Muslims get along with other religious groups, such as Mormons in Utah? Journey into America is equal parts anthropological research, listening tour, and travelogue. Whereas Ahmed’s previous book took the reader into homes, schools, and mosques in the Muslim world, his new quest takes us into the heart of America and its Muslim communities. It is absolutely essential reading for anyone trying to make sense of America today.

Heroes With Humble Beginnings

Author: F.M. Kail
Publisher: iUniverse
ISBN: 1532072295
Size: 29.18 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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We are a nation of underdogs, founded by immigrants seeking a better life. This book reminds us of the humble beginnings of some of the greatest ballplayers, movie stars and Presidents of all time, men who faced adversities growing up and who, in overcoming them, gave credence to the American Dream.

Blood And The Covenant

Author: Pierre Parisien
Publisher: Trafford Publishing
ISBN: 1426942117
Size: 23.77 MB
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Blood and the Covenant tells the story of a mindsetthe conception of a personal covenant between God and manand the insidious consequences of this mindset. Author Pierre Parisien examines the history of covenantal belief and looks critically at two of its most troubling aspects: appropriation (the Promised Land) and moral dispensation (the belief that if you are doing it for God, then it is not a sin but a virtuous act). Parisien traces the historical consequences of the contract with God, from the campaigns of Joshua in Canaan to the present manifestations of ideological Zionism. He argues that the course of history has been, in great part, a consequence of the original Covenant, and he charts the regrettable lineage of atrocities committed under the auspices of covenant fulfillmentincluding the conquest of Canaan to the hegemony of Rome, the rape of Northern India by the Muslim Sultans, the Crusades, European colonialism (which considered the entire planet as the Promised Land), Manifest Destiny, and ideological Zionism. Wars, crimes against humanity, and genocide have too often been the aftermath of the Covenant. Will this woeful progression ever come to an end?

In The Heart Of The Sea Young Readers Edition

Author: Nathaniel Philbrick
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101998075
Size: 37.19 MB
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The New York Times bestselling and National Book Award winning In the Heart of the Sea, soon to be a major motion picture directed by Ron Howard, adapted by the author for young readers. On November 20, 1820, the whaleship Essex was rammed and sunk by an angry whale. Within minutes, the twenty-one-man crew, including the fourteen-year-old cabin boy Thomas Nickerson, found themselves stranded in three leaky boats in the middle of the Pacific Ocean with barely any supplies and little hope. Three months later, two of the boats were rescued 4,500 miles away, off the coast of South America. Of the twenty-one castaways, only eight survived, including young Thomas. Based on his New York Times best-seller In the Heart of the Sea, Nathaniel Philbrick recreates the amazing events of the ill-fated Essex through the sailors own first-hand accounts, photos, maps, and artwork, and tells the tale of one of the great true-life adventure stories. "Horrifyingly engrossing." —Kirkus Reviews "A compelling saga of desperation and survival." —School Library Journal

The Revolutionary Constitution

Author: David J. Bodenhamer
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 019991303X
Size: 72.89 MB
Format: PDF
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The framers of the Constitution chose their words carefully when they wrote of a more perfect union--not absolutely perfect, but with room for improvement. Indeed, we no longer operate under the same Constitution as that ratified in 1788, or even the one completed by the Bill of Rights in 1791--because we are no longer the same nation. In The Revolutionary Constitution, David J. Bodenhamer provides a comprehensive new look at America's basic law, integrating the latest legal scholarship with historical context to highlight how it has evolved over time. The Constitution, he notes, was the product of the first modern revolution, and revolutions are, by definition, moments when the past shifts toward an unfamiliar future, one radically different from what was foreseen only a brief time earlier. In seeking to balance power and liberty, the framers established a structure that would allow future generations to continually readjust the scale. Bodenhamer explores this dynamic through seven major constitutional themes: federalism, balance of powers, property, representation, equality, rights, and security. With each, he takes a historical approach, following their changes over time. For example, the framers wrote multiple protections for property rights into the Constitution in response to actions by state governments after the Revolution. But twentieth-century courts--and Congress--redefined property rights through measures such as zoning and the designation of historical landmarks (diminishing their commercial value) in response to the needs of a modern economy. The framers anticipated just such a future reworking of their own compromises between liberty and power. With up-to-the-minute legal expertise and a broad grasp of the social and political context, this book is a tour de force of Constitutional history and analysis.

Dissent

Author: Ralph Young
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 1479814520
Size: 69.36 MB
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Finalist, 2016 Ralph Waldo Emerson Award One of Bustle's Books For Your Civil Disobedience Reading List Dissent: The History of an American Idea examines the key role dissent has played in shaping the United States. It focuses on those who, from colonial days to the present, dissented against the ruling paradigm of their time: from the Puritan Anne Hutchinson and Native American chief Powhatan in the seventeenth century, to the Occupy and Tea Party movements in the twenty-first century. The emphasis is on the way Americans, celebrated figures and anonymous ordinary citizens, responded to what they saw as the injustices that prevented them from fully experiencing their vision of America. At its founding the United States committed itself to lofty ideals. When the promise of those ideals was not fully realized by all Americans, many protested and demanded that the United States live up to its promise. Women fought for equal rights; abolitionists sought to destroy slavery; workers organized unions; Indians resisted white encroachment on their land; radicals angrily demanded an end to the dominance of the moneyed interests; civil rights protestors marched to end segregation; antiwar activists took to the streets to protest the nation’s wars; and reactionaries, conservatives, and traditionalists in each decade struggled to turn back the clock to a simpler, more secure time. Some dissenters are celebrated heroes of American history, while others are ordinary people: frequently overlooked, but whose stories show that change is often accomplished through grassroots activism. The United States is a nation founded on the promise and power of dissent. In this stunningly comprehensive volume, Ralph Young shows us its history. Teaching Resources from Temple University: Sample Course Syllabus Teaching Resources from C-Span Classroom Teaching Resources from Temple University

Bunker Hill

Author: Nathaniel Philbrick
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101622709
Size: 43.26 MB
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The bestselling author of In the Heart of the Sea, Valiant Ambition, and In the Hurricane's Eye tells the story of the Boston battle that ignited the American Revolution, in this "masterpiece of narrative and perspective." (Boston Globe) Boston in 1775 is an island city occupied by British troops after a series of incendiary incidents by patriots who range from sober citizens to thuggish vigilantes. After the Boston Tea Party, British and American soldiers and Massachusetts residents have warily maneuvered around each other until April 19, when violence finally erupts at Lexington and Concord. In June, however, with the city cut off from supplies by a British blockade and Patriot militia poised in siege, skirmishes give way to outright war in the Battle of Bunker Hill. It would be the bloodiest battle of the Revolution to come, and the point of no return for the rebellious colonists. Philbrick brings a fresh perspective to every aspect of the story. He finds new characters, and new facets to familiar ones. The real work of choreographing rebellion falls to a thirty-three year old physician named Joseph Warren who emerges as the on-the-ground leader of the Patriot cause and is fated to die at Bunker Hill. Others in the cast include Paul Revere, Warren’s fiancé the poet Mercy Scollay, a newly recruited George Washington, the reluctant British combatant General Thomas Gage and his more bellicose successor William Howe, who leads the three charges at Bunker Hill and presides over the claustrophobic cauldron of a city under siege as both sides play a nervy game of brinkmanship for control. With passion and insight, Philbrick reconstructs the revolutionary landscape—geographic and ideological—in a mesmerizing narrative of the robust, messy, blisteringly real origins of America.