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Milwaukee S Bronzeville

Author: Paul H. Geenen
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1439633029
Size: 63.15 MB
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With the migration of African American sharecroppers to northern cities in the first half of the 20th century, the African American population of Milwaukee grew from fewer than 1,000 in 1900 to nearly 22,000 by 1950. Most settled around a 12-block area along Walnut Street that came to be known as Milwaukee's Bronzeville, a thriving residential, business, and entertainment community. Barbershops, restaurants, drugstores, and funeral homes were started with a little money saved from overtime pay at factory jobs or extra domestic work taken on by the women. Exotic nightclubs, taverns, and restaurants attracted a racially mixed clientele, and daytime social clubs sponsored "matinees" that were dress-up events featuring local bands catering to neighborhood residents. Bronzeville is remembered by African American elders as a good place to grow up--times were hard, but the community was tight.

Forgotten Tales Of Wisconsin

Author: Martin Hintz
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1614231877
Size: 78.91 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 1991
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Drift back to an era when the speed limit in Milwaukee was an edgy four miles per hour and Madison lawmakers could poke at hogs to punctuate the tedium of legislative sessions. Martin Hintz makes even the slow times of the Badger State fly by in this collection of Wisconsin's forgotten memories. Taste the world's first batch of pink lemonade (made with the dye of a circus performer's pants) and witness the tragic death of the world's last wild passenger pigeon. Track down ancient Algonkin legends like the great serpent that swam up the Mississippi looking for copper, and drop in on modern legends like Les Paul, whose guitar spun records into gold.

Wisconsin Votes

Author: Robert Booth Fowler
Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press
ISBN: 9780299227449
Size: 73.49 MB
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This is the first full history of voting in Wisconsin from statehood in 1848 to the present. Fowler both tells the story of voting in key elections across the years and investigates electoral trends and patterns over the course of Wisconsin's history. He explores the ways that ethnic and religious groups in the state have voted historically and how they vote today, and he looks at the successes and failures of the two major parties over the years. Highlighting important historical movements, Fowler discusses the great struggle for women's suffrage and the rich tales of many Wisconsin third parties--the Socialists, Progressives, the Prohibition Party, and others. Here, too, are the famous politicians in Wisconsin history, such as the La Follettes, William Proxmire, and Tommy Thompson. Winner, Award of Merit for Leadership in History, American Association for State and Local History

Conservative Counterrevolution

Author: Tula A Connell
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252098064
Size: 18.90 MB
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In the 1950s, Milwaukee's strong union movement and socialist mayor seemed to embody a dominant liberal consensus that sought to continue and expand the New Deal. Tula Connell explores how business interests and political conservatives arose to undo that consensus, and how the resulting clash both shaped a city and helped redefine postwar American politics. Connell focuses on Frank Zeidler, the city's socialist mayor. Zeidler's broad concept of the public interest at times defied even liberal expectations. At the same time, a resurgence of conservatism with roots presaging twentieth-century politics challenged his initiatives in public housing, integration, and other areas. As Connell shows, conservatives created an anti-progressive game plan that included a well-funded media and PR push; an anti-union assault essential to the larger project of delegitimizing any government action; opposition to civil rights; and support from a suburban silent majority. In the end, the campaign undermined notions of the common good essential to the New Deal order. It also sowed the seeds for grassroots conservatism's more extreme and far-reaching future success.