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Morality Tales

Author: Leslie Peirce
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520228928
Size: 64.28 MB
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"Leslie Peirce has produced a meticulously researched and gloriously imagined work of historical scholarship. Her deep familiarity with the city of Aintab (today’s Gaziantep) shines through on every page as she recreates the world of the city and its inhabitants in the middle of the sixteenth century. Using a wide variety of sources, Peirce departs from state-centered approach of much of Ottoman historiography and asks instead how individuals understood themselves and their place in Ottoman society. Her answers take us into areas of Ottoman society that are still obscure. We see Aintabans grappling with issues of class, morality, heresy, and the differences between men and women. Throughout, Peirce excavates the complicated relationship between a society that understands itself as Islamic but whose sources of meaning and order are not confined to the religious tradition."—Molly Greene, Princeton University "This is another masterpiece that will, like Leslie Peirce’s first book, become a classic. Once again, she shows a special talent for raising relevant issues that have remained unexplored and shedding light on older issues with illuminating interpretations. . . . The heterogeneity of law and the variability of justice emerge clearly, as do the flexibility and fluidity of legal practices, justice as a process not a structure, and law as a product of debate among providers and users."—Lucette Valensi, author of La Fuite en Egypte: Histoires d'Orient et d'Occident, 2002 "Leslie Peirce guides the reader through the Anatolian town of Aintab, twenty-five years after its incorporation into the Ottoman Empire. Using the local court records for the year 1540-1541 and the fascinating accounts of women talkingæsometimes even shouting and cursingætheir way into court, she reveals the intricacies of the legal system at the crossroads of imperial law and local custom. . . . Morality Tales is a must for Ottomanists, to whom it will offer a truly innovative methodology and a brilliant portrayal and analysis of this complex and fascinating period. More important, however, this book will reveal to a wider audience that Ottoman history has a lot to contribute to the understanding of early modern society and politics."—Edhem Eldem, Bogaziçi University, Istanbul

Islamic Law Gender And Social Change In Post Abolition Zanzibar

Author: Elke E. Stockreiter
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1316240223
Size: 27.34 MB
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After the abolition of slavery in 1897, Islamic courts in Zanzibar (East Africa) became central institutions where former slaves negotiated socioeconomic participation. By using difficult-to-read Islamic court records in Arabic, Elke E. Stockreiter reassesses the workings of these courts as well as gender and social relations in Zanzibar Town during British colonial rule (1890–1963). She shows how Muslim judges maintained their autonomy within the sphere of family law and describes how they helped advance the rights of women, ex-slaves, and other marginalised groups. As was common in other parts of the Muslim world, women usually had to buy their divorce. Thus, Muslim judges played important roles as litigants negotiated moving up the social hierarchy, with ethnicisation increasingly influencing all actors. Drawing on these previously unexplored sources, this study investigates how Muslim judges both mediated and generated discourses of inclusion and exclusion based on social status rather than gender.

The Ottoman Empire 1300 1650

Author: Colin Imber
Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education
ISBN: 1352004143
Size: 34.60 MB
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[This book] surveys the history of the Ottoman Empire from its obscure origins in the fourteenth century, through its rise to world-power in the status in the sixteenth century, to the troubled times of the seventeenth century. [In the book, the author] focuses on the ... internal structure and politics of the Ottoman Empire, analysing the various institutions through which the Ottoman Sultan projected his power: the dynasty, and the means of recruitment to dynastic service; the palace, court and central government; provincial government; the law; the army and the fleet. [He also] charts the growth and development of these institutions over three-and-a-half centuries, until a period of crisis in the 1600s curbed the Empire's expansion and caused significant structural changes.-Dust jacket.

Transformation Of Muslim Mystical Thought In The Ottoman Empire

Author: John J Curry
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 0748686916
Size: 23.62 MB
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Based on careful study of the substantial and largely unpublished manuscript legacy left by the Halveti mystical order, one of the most influential Sufi orders in the Ottoman Empire, this is a history of the rise and spread of its Sa'baniyye branch betwee

The Impossible State

Author: Wael B. Hallaq
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231530862
Size: 71.97 MB
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Wael B. Hallaq boldly argues that the "Islamic state," judged by any standard definition of what the modern state represents, is both impossible and inherently self-contradictory. Comparing the legal, political, moral, and constitutional histories of premodern Islam and Euro-America, he finds the adoption and practice of the modern state to be highly problematic for modern Muslims. He also critiques more expansively modernity's moral predicament, which renders impossible any project resting solely on ethical foundations. The modern state not only suffers from serious legal, political, and constitutional issues, Hallaq argues, but also, by its very nature, fashions a subject inconsistent with what it means to be, or to live as, a Muslim. By Islamic standards, the state's technologies of the self are severely lacking in moral substance, and today's Islamic state, as Hallaq shows, has done little to advance an acceptable form of genuine Shari'a governance. The Islamists' constitutional battles in Egypt and Pakistan, the Islamic legal and political failures of the Iranian Revolution, and similar disappointments underscore this fact. Nevertheless, the state remains the favored template of the Islamists and the ulama (Muslim clergymen). Providing Muslims with a path toward realizing the good life, Hallaq turns to the rich moral resources of Islamic history. Along the way, he proves political and other "crises of Islam" are not unique to the Islamic world nor to the Muslim religion. These crises are integral to the modern condition of both East and West, and by acknowledging these parallels, Muslims can engage more productively with their Western counterparts.

Difference And Disability In The Medieval Islamic World

Author: Kristina Richardson
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 0748664912
Size: 25.48 MB
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A revealing portrait of Medieval Arab notions of physical difference, this book uses close analysis of primary sources to bring to light cultural views and lived experiences of disability and difference.

Islamic Law In Action

Author: Kristen Stilt
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191629820
Size: 67.45 MB
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A dynamic account of the practice of Islamic law, this book focuses on the actions of a particular legal official, the muhtasib, whose vast jurisdiction included all public behavior. In the cities of Cairo and neighboring Fustat during the Mamluk period (1250-1517), the men who held the position of muhtasib acted as regulators of markets and public spaces generally. They traversed their jurisdictions carrying out the duty to command right and forbid wrong, and were as much a part of the legal landscape as the better-known figures of judge and mufti. Taking directions from the rulers, the sultan foremost among them, they were also guided by legal doctrine as formulated by the jurists, combining these two sources of law in one face of authority. The daily workings of the law are illuminated by the reports of the muhtasib in the vivid Mamluk-era chronicles, which often also captured the responses of the individuals who encountered the official. The book is organized around actions taken by the muhtasib in the areas of Muslim devotional and pious practices; crimes and offenses; the management of Christians and Jews; market regulation and consumer protection; the specific markets for essential bread; currency and taxes; and public order. The case studies presented show that while legal doctrine was clearly relevant to the muhtasib's actions, the policy demands of the sultan were also quite significant, and rules from both sources of authority intersected with social, political, economic, and personal factors to create full and vibrant scenarios that reveal the practice of Islamic law.

Producing Desire

Author: Dror Ze evi
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520245636
Size: 34.28 MB
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“Producing Desire is a major, highly original, and often surprising presentation of sexual attitudes and practices in the Ottoman Middle East. The author uses a wide variety of contemporary sources to shed new light and draw original conclusions regarding changing attitudes toward sexuality in the Ottoman Empire before and after western influences. These influences are shown to have inhibited forms of male sexual expression that had occurred more freely in an earlier period. I recommend it enthusiastically for students, faculty, and the general public.”—Nikki R. Keddie, author of Modern Iran: Roots and Results of Revolution “Using the concept of multiple scripts, Dror Ze'evi brings together into a powerfully analytical focus several sexual discourses to give us a historically grounded and nuanced story about Ottoman sexual thought and practices. No other work brings these 'scripts' together the way Ze'evi has attempted and successfully accomplished.”—Afsaneh Najmabadi, author of Women with Mustaches and Men without Beards: Gender and Sexual Anxieties of Iranian Modernity “As a broad treatment of questions of sexuality over four centuries, Producing Desire not only takes up a topic that no one else has treated systematically, but also aims ambitiously to talk about change over time, and in particular to describe the ambiguous and uneasy outlook of the nineteenth century, when various discourses about sex were challenged.”—Leslie Peirce, author of Morality Tales: Law and Gender in the Ottoman Court of Aintab