Download new orleans and the texas revolution in pdf or read new orleans and the texas revolution in pdf online books in PDF, EPUB and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to get new orleans and the texas revolution in pdf book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want.



New Orleans And The Texas Revolution

Author: Edward L. Miller
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
ISBN: 1603446451
Size: 15.68 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 6970
Download and Read
"Author Edward L. Miller has delved into previously unused or overlooked papers housed in New Orleans to reconstruct a chain of events that set the Crescent City, in many ways, at the center of the Texian fight for independence. Not only did Now Orleans business interests send money and men to Texas in exchange for promises of land, but they also provided newspaper coverage that set the scene for later American annexation of the young republic."--BOOK JACKET.

Volunteers In The Texas Revolution

Author: Gary Brown
Publisher: Taylor Trade Publishing
ISBN: 0585235716
Size: 61.35 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 215
Download and Read
The New Orleans Greys were a group of young men, out for the adventure and money to be gained from war. This book details the importance of their participation in the Battle of the Alamo, as well as several other battles in the rebellion of 1835. Historian Brown has taken some little known history and created a fascinating and well-crafted story for the mainstream reader.

Discovering Texas History

Author: Bruce A. Glasrud
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 0806147830
Size: 63.60 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 3722
Download and Read
The most comprehensive and up-to-date guide to Texas historiography of the past quarter-century, this volume of original essays will be an invaluable resource and definitive reference for teachers, students, and researchers of Texas history. Conceived as a follow-up to the award-winning A Guide to the History of Texas (1988), Discovering Texas History focuses on the major trends in the study of Texas history since 1990. In two sections, arranged topically and chronologically, some of the most prominent authors in the field survey the major works and most significant interpretations in the historical literature. Topical essays take up historical themes ranging from Native Americans, Mexican Americans, African Americans, and women in Texas to European immigrant history; literature, the visual arts, and music in the state; and urban and military history. Chronological essays cover the full span of Texas historiography from the Spanish era through the Civil War, to the Progressive Era and World Wars I and II, and finally to the early twenty-first century. Critical commentary on particular books and articles is the unifying purpose of these contributions, whose authors focus on analyzing and summarizing the subjects that have captured the attention of professional historians in recent years. Together the essays gathered here will constitute the standard reference on Texas historiography for years to come, guiding readers and researchers to future, ever deeper discoveries in the history of Texas.

Encyclopedia Of The Alamo And The Texas Revolution

Author: Thom Hatch
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 0786491620
Size: 20.46 MB
Format: PDF
View: 6811
Download and Read
“Remember the Alamo!” is a phrase that is woven into the American consciousness, but what do most people really remember about the Alamo? Much of the true story has been shrouded in myth for over 150 years. This comprehensive encyclopedia provides thorough coverage for people, places, events and issues spanning the pre–Revolution period and settlement of Texas by Americans to the forming of the Republic in 1836. When appropriate, a mini-chronology supplements the entry, placing the discussion in context. A day-by-day account details the thirteen day famous siege. Entries cover major players such as Santa Anna, Jim Bowie and David Crockett and provide biographies (from obscure sources, in some cases) of every Alamo defender killed in the battle. American and Mexican resources have been used to assure a well-rounded picture of often misunderstood events. Maps and an extensive bibliography complement the text.

Southern Queen

Author: Thomas Ruys Smith
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1441158227
Size: 22.27 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 2784
Download and Read
New Orleans occupies a singular position within American life. Drawing deeply from Old World traditions and New World possibilities, the port city of the Mississippi has proved a lure to an extraordinary variety of travellers from its very earliest days. New Orleans has always been a world city like no other: it combines the magnolia and moonlight appeal of Southern romanticism, a popular sense of exoticism and decadence, the hint of illicit sex, and a cultural history without compare. However, alongside the glamour there runs another story - of tension, conflict, hardship and destruction. It was in the nineteenth century that the city's most distinctive characteristics were forged, and chapters will be based around signal moments that reveal the city's essential qualities: the Battle of New Orleans in 1815; the World's Fair in 1884; the establishment of Storyville in 1897. Whilst painting a portrait of the public face of New Orleans, the book will look behind the carnival mask to explore aspects of the city's history which have so often been kept hidden from view.

Women And The Texas Revolution

Author: Mary L. Scheer
Publisher: University of North Texas Press
ISBN: 1574414690
Size: 31.58 MB
Format: PDF
View: 739
Download and Read
"Historically, wars and revolutions have offered politically and socially disadvantaged people the opportunity to contribute to the nation (or cause) in exchange for future expanded rights. Although shorter than most conflicts, the Texas Revolution nonetheless profoundly affected not only the leaders and armies, but the survivors, especially women, who endured those tumultuous events and whose lives were altered by the accompanying political, social, and economic changes.

Leaders In The Texas Revolution United For A Cause

Author: Kelly Rodgers
Publisher: Teacher Created Materials
ISBN: 9781433350474
Size: 62.60 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 6864
Download and Read
In the middle of the 1830s, Texans fought against the Mexican government for its independence. During the Texas Revolution, many leaders emerged, such as Sam Houston, Lorenzo de Zavala, William Travis, Francita Alavez, Sidney Sherman, Susanna Dickinson, James Bowie, and Juan Seguín. This captivating biography allows readers to learn about the incredible accomplishments of these people and what they did to make an impact on the Texas Revolution. Featuring alluring images, engaging facts and sidebars, supportive text, and a glossary and index, this book will have readers eager to learn more!

Hesitant Martyr Of The Texas Revolution

Author: Gary Brown
Publisher: Taylor Trade Publications
ISBN: 1461661978
Size: 62.37 MB
Format: PDF
View: 855
Download and Read
James Walker Fannin. Illegitimate son. Southern gentleman. Failed businessman. Devoted family man. Illegal slave trader. Courageous martyr. Tarnished hero of the revolution. But what is the rest of the story? Author Gary Brown brings to life a thorough and insightful analysis of this controversial and sometimes misunderstood historical figure, whom most remember as the commander who lost twice as many men as were killed at the Alamo and San Jacinto combined. Now the story can be completely examined with the help of all Fannin's known correspondence during the campaign at Goliad. Read and judge for yourself if history has been fair to James Walker Fannin.

The Comanche Empire

Author: Pekka Hamalainen (Hämäläinen)
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300145137
Size: 52.20 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 3028
Download and Read
In the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, a Native American empire rose to dominate the fiercely contested lands of the American Southwest, the southern Great Plains, and northern Mexico. This powerful empire, built by the Comanche Indians, eclipsed its various European rivals in military prowess, political prestige, economic power, commercial reach, and cultural influence. Yet, until now, the Comanche empire has gone unrecognized in American history. This compelling and original book uncovers the lost story of the Comanches. It is a story that challenges the idea of indigenous peoples as victims of European expansion and offers a new model for the history of colonial expansion, colonial frontiers, and Native-European relations in North America and elsewhere. Pekka Hämäläinen shows in vivid detail how the Comanches built their unique empire and resisted European colonization, and why they fell to defeat in 1875. With extensive knowledge and deep insight, the author brings into clear relief the Comanches’ remarkable impact on the trajectory of history.