Download one drop of blood the american misadventure of race in pdf or read one drop of blood the american misadventure of race in pdf online books in PDF, EPUB and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to get one drop of blood the american misadventure of race in pdf book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want.



One Drop Of Blood

Author: Scott Malcomson
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
ISBN: 9781429936071
Size: 37.88 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 1436
Download and Read
A bold and original retelling of the story of race in America Why has a nation founded upon precepts of freedom and universal humanity continually produced, through its preoccupation with race, a divided and constrained populace? This question is the starting point for Scott Malcomson's riveting and deeply researched account, which amplifies history with memoir and reportage. From the beginning, Malcomson shows, a nation obsessed with invention began to create a new idea of race, investing it with unprecedented moral and social meaning. A succession of visionaries and opportunists, self-promoters and would-be reformers carried on the process, helping to define "black," "white," and "Indian" in opposition to one another, and in service to the aspirations and anxieties of each era. But the people who had to live within those definitions found them constraining. They sought to escape the limits of race imposed by escaping from other races or by controlling, confining, eliminating, or absorbing them, in a sad, absurd parade of events. Such efforts have never truly succeeded, yet their legacy haunts us, as we unhappily re-enact the drama of separatism in our schools, workplaces, and communities. By not only recounting the shared American tragicomedy of race but helping us to own, even to embrace it, this important book offers us a way at last to move beyond it.

Blood

Author: Gil Anidjar
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231167202
Size: 40.48 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 819
Download and Read
Blood, in Gil AnidjarÕs argument, maps the singular history of Christianity. A category for historical analysis, blood can be seen through its literal and metaphorical uses as determining, sometimes even defining, Western culture, politics, and social practices and their wide-ranging incarnations in nationalism, capitalism, and law. Engaging with a variety of sources, Anidjar explores the presence and the absence, the making and unmaking of blood in philosophy and medicine, law and literature, and economic and political thought, from ancient Greece to medieval Spain, from the Bible to Shakespeare and Melville. The prevalence of blood in the social, juridical, and political organization of the modern West signals that we do not live in a secular age into which religion could return. Flowing across multiple boundaries, infusing them with violent precepts that we must address, blood undoes the presumed oppositions between religion and politics, economy and theology, and kinship and race. It demonstrates that what we think of as modern is in fact imbued with Christianity. Christianity, Blood fiercely argues, must be reconsidered beyond the boundaries of religion alone.

Legal History Of The Color Line

Author: Frank W. Sweet
Publisher: Backintyme
ISBN: 0939479230
Size: 55.97 MB
Format: PDF
View: 2098
Download and Read
This analysis of the nearly 300 appealed court cases that decided the "race" of individual Americans may be the most thorough study of the legal history of the U.S. color line yet published.

Race And Epistemologies Of Ignorance

Author: Shannon Sullivan
Publisher: SUNY Press
ISBN: 9780791471029
Size: 14.74 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 5422
Download and Read
Offering a wide variety of philosophical approaches to the neglected philosophical problem of ignorance, this groundbreaking collection builds on Charles Mills's claim that racism involves an inverted epistemology, an epistemology of ignorance. Contributors, explore how different forms of ignorance linked to race are produced and sustained and what role they play in promoting racism and white privilege. They argue that the ignorance that underpins racism is not a simple gap in knowledge, the accidental result of an epistemological oversight. In the case of racial oppression, ignorance often is actively produced for purposes of domination and exploitation. But as these essays demonstrate, ignorance is not simply a tool of oppression wielded by the powerful. It can also be a strategy for survival, an important tool for people of color to wield against white privilege and white supremacy. The book concludes that understanding ignorance and the politics of such ignorance should be a key element of epistemological and social/political analyses, for it has the potential to reveal the role of power in the construction of what is known and provide a lens for the political values at work in knowledge practices. Book jacket.

Reconstructing The Native South

Author: Melanie Benson Taylor
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 0820338842
Size: 65.33 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 5164
Download and Read
In Reconstructing the Native South, Melanie Benson Taylor examines the diverse body of Native American literature in the contemporary U.S. South—literature written by the descendants of tribes who evaded Removal and have maintained ties with their southeastern homelands. In so doing Taylor advances a provocative, even counterintuitive claim: that the U.S. South and its Native American survivors have far more in common than mere geographical proximity. Both cultures have long been haunted by separate histories of loss and nostalgia, Taylor contends, and the moments when those experiences converge in explicit and startling ways have yet to be investigated by scholars. These convergences often bear the scars of protracted colonial antagonism, appropriation, and segregation, and they share preoccupations with land, sovereignty, tradition, dispossession, subjugation, purity, and violence. Taylor poses difficult questions in this work. In the aftermath of Removal and colonial devastation, what remains—for Native and non-Native southerners—to be recovered? Is it acceptable to identify an Indian “lost cause”? Is a deep sense of hybridity and intercultural affiliation the only coherent way forward, both for the New South and for its oldest inhabitants? And in these newly entangled, postcolonial environments, has global capitalism emerged as the new enemy for the twenty-first century? Reconstructing the Native South is a compellingly original work that contributes to conversations in Native American, southern, and transnational American studies.

Soul Babies

Author: Mark Anthony Neal
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135290555
Size: 78.32 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 4161
Download and Read
In Soul Babies, Mark Anthony Neal explains the complexities and contradictions of black life and culture after the end of the Civil Rights era. He traces the emergence of what he calls a "post-soul aesthetic," a transformation of values that marked a profound change in African American thought and experience. Lively and provocative, Soul Babies offers a valuable new way of thinking about black popular culture and the legacy of the sixties.

The New Encyclopedia Of Southern Culture

Author: Celeste Ray
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469616580
Size: 68.95 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 286
Download and Read
Transcending familiar categories of "black" and "white," this volume of The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture complicates and enriches our understanding of "southernness" by identifying the array of cultures that combined to shape the South. This exploration of southern ethnicities examines the ways people perform and maintain cultural identities through folklore, religious faith, dress, music, speech, cooking, and transgenerational tradition. Accessibly written and informed by the most recent research that recovers the ethnic diversity of the early South and documents the more recent arrival of new cultural groups, this volume greatly expands upon the modest Ethnic Life section of the original Encyclopedia. Contributors describe 88 ethnic groups that have lived in the South from the Mississippian Period (1000-1600) to the present. They include 34 American Indian groups, as well as the many communities with European, African, and Asian cultural ties that came to the region after 1600. Southerners from all backgrounds are likely to find themselves represented here.

Frontiers In Dalit Hermeneutics

Author: James Massey
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 67.19 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 5059
Download and Read
Contributed articles presented at the First International Seminar on "Hermeneutics of Subaltern Praxis with Special Reference to Dalits" organized by the Centre for Dalit/Subaltern Studies, New Delhi from Oct. 26-29, 2004; includes follow up seminar on the same theme in South India on March 11-13, 2005 held at Vellore.

Diversity In America

Author: Peter H. Schuck
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674018549
Size: 28.66 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 2534
Download and Read
A revisionist history of race in America focuses on the nation's pioneering role as the world's first truly multi-ethnic state, citing numerous examples of the ideal of diversity in American society.