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Purity And Exile

Author: Liisa H. Malkki
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022619096X
Size: 78.79 MB
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In this study of Hutu refugees from Burundi, driven into exile in Tanzania after their 1972 insurrection against the dominant Tutsi was brutally quashed, Liisa Malkki shows how experiences of dispossession and violence are remembered and turned into narratives, and how this process helps to construct identities such as "Hutu" and "Tutsi." Through extensive fieldwork in two refugee communities, Malkki finds that the refugees' current circumstances significantly influence these constructions. Those living in organized camps created an elaborate "mythico-history" of the Hutu people, which gave significance to exile, and envisioned a collective return to the homeland of Burundi. Other refugees, who had assimilated in a more urban setting, crafted identities in response to the practical circumstances of their day to day lives. Malkki reveals how such things as national identity, historical consciousness, and the social imagination of "enemies" get constructed in the process of everyday life. The book closes with an epilogue looking at the recent violence between Hutu and Tutsi in Rwanda and Burundi, and showing how the movement of large refugee populations across national borders has shaped patterns of violence in the region.

Gender Space And Time

Author: Dorothy Moss
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 9780739114513
Size: 67.63 MB
Format: PDF
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Drawing on the work of Henri Lefebvre and Barbara Adam, Gender, Space, and Time is a brilliant study that offers a unique and original threefold conceptualization of how space and time is developed and applied in an empirical study of women's lives. Moss conceptualizes women as centers of action and demonstrates the ways in which they construct personal pathways, connect different spheres of experience, intergrate new time demands into the multiple rhythms of their everyday lives, and carve out personal space.

Forced Migration And Global Processes

Author: Francois Crepeau
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 0739155059
Size: 27.30 MB
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Forced Migration and Global Processes considers the crossroads of forced migration with three global trends: development, human rights, and security. This expert collection studies these complex interactions and aims to help determine what solutions may alleviate most of the human suffering involved in forced migrations.

Fear In Bongoland

Author: Marc Sommers
Publisher: Berghahn Books
ISBN: 9781571813312
Size: 47.31 MB
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But these young men nonetheless join migrants in "Bongoland" (meaning "Brainland") where, as the nickname suggests, only the shrewdest and most cunning can survive.".

Violence

Author: Parvis Ghassem-Fachandi
Publisher: Berg
ISBN: 1847886256
Size: 17.29 MB
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Violence takes many forms. From large-scale acts of terrorism to assaults on single individuals, violence is a defining force in shaping human experience and a central theme in anthropological study. Violence: Ethnographic Encounters presents a set of vivid first-hand accounts of fieldwork experiences of violence. The examples range across Latin America, Asia, the Middle East and Africa, and illustrate instances of state terror, insurgency, communal violence, war, prison violence, class conflict, security measures, and sexual violence. How do these anthropologists come to know a place through such violent experience? Why do they not leave such scenes? What insights follow from such experience? Violence: Ethnographic Encounters offers readers a broad anthropological study of violence through personal encounters.

A Companion To Border Studies

Author: Thomas M. Wilson
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118255259
Size: 21.59 MB
Format: PDF
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A Companion to Border Studies introduces an excitingand expanding field of interdisciplinary research, through thewriting of an international array of scholars, from diverseperspectives that include anthropology, development studies,geography, history, political science and sociology. Explores how nations and cultural identities are beingtransformed by their dynamic, shifting borders where mobility issometimes facilitated, other times impeded or prevented Offers an array of international views which together form anauthoritative guide for students, instructors and researchers Reflects recent significant growth in the importance ofunderstanding the distinctive characteristics of borders andfrontiers, including cross-border cooperation, security andcontrols, migration and population displacements, hybridity, andtransnationalism

The Making Of The Modern Refugee

Author: Peter Gatrell
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199674167
Size: 68.55 MB
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Offers a comprehensive history of global population displacement in the twentieth century, and provides a new analytic approach to the subject by exploring its causes, consequences, and meanings

Refugees Theatre And Crisis

Author: A. Jeffers
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 0230354823
Size: 75.47 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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Using examples of refugee arts and theatrical activity since the 1990s, this book examines how the 'refugee crisis' has conditioned all arts and cultural activity with refugees in a world where globalization and migration go hand in hand.

The Oxford Handbook Of Refugee And Forced Migration Studies

Author: Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191645885
Size: 62.77 MB
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Refugee and Forced Migration Studies has grown from being a concern of a relatively small number of scholars and policy researchers in the 1980s to a global field of interest with thousands of students worldwide studying displacement either from traditional disciplinary perspectives or as a core component of newer programmes across the Humanities and Social and Political Sciences. Today the field encompasses both rigorous academic research which may or may not ultimately inform policy and practice, as well as action-research focused on advocating in favour of refugees' needs and rights. This authoritative Handbook critically evaluates the birth and development of Refugee and Forced Migration Studies, and analyses the key contemporary and future challenges faced by academics and practitioners working with and for forcibly displaced populations around the world. The 52 state-of-the-art chapters, written by leading academics, practitioners, and policymakers working in universities, research centres, think tanks, NGOs and international organizations, provide a comprehensive and cutting-edge overview of the key intellectual, political, social and institutional challenges arising from mass displacement in the world today. The chapters vividly illustrate the vibrant and engaging debates that characterize this rapidly expanding field of research and practice.

Between Two Motherlands

Author: Theodora Dragostinova
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 9780801461163
Size: 49.69 MB
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In 1900, some 100,000 people living in Bulgaria-2 percent of the country's population-could be described as Greek, whether by nationality, language, or religion. The complex identities of the population-proud heirs of ancient Hellenic colonists, loyal citizens of their Bulgarian homeland, members of a wider Greek diasporic community, devout followers of the Orthodox Patriarchate in Istanbul, and reluctant supporters of the Greek government in Athens-became entangled in the growing national tensions between Bulgaria and Greece during the first half of the twentieth century. In Between Two Motherlands, Theodora Dragostinova explores the shifting allegiances of this Greek minority in Bulgaria. Diverse social groups contested the meaning of the nation, shaping and reshaping what it meant to be Greek and Bulgarian during the slow and painful transition from empire to nation-states in the Balkans. In these decades, the region was racked by a series of upheavals (the Balkan Wars, World War I, interwar population exchanges, World War II, and Communist revolutions). The Bulgarian Greeks were caught between the competing agendas of two states increasingly bent on establishing national homogeneity. Based on extensive research in the archives of Bulgaria and Greece, as well as fieldwork in the two countries, Dragostinova shows that the Greek population did not blindly follow Greek nationalist leaders but was torn between identification with the land of their birth and loyalty to the Greek cause. Many emigrated to Greece in response to nationalist pressures; others sought to maintain their Greek identity and traditions within Bulgaria; some even switched sides when it suited their personal interests. National loyalties remained fluid despite state efforts to fix ethnic and political borders by such means as population movements, minority treaties, and stringent citizenship rules. The lessons of a case such as this continue to reverberate wherever and whenever states try to adjust national borders in regions long inhabited by mixed populations.