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The Columbia History Of Jews And Judaism In America

Author: Marc Lee Raphael
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231132239
Size: 63.52 MB
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This collection focuses on a variety of important themes in the American Jewish and Judaic experience. It opens with essays on early Jewish settlers (1654-1820), the expansion of Jewish life in America (1820-1901), the great wave of eastern European Jewish immigrants (1880-1924), the character of American Judaism between the two world wars, American Jewish life from the end of World War II to the Six-Day War, and the growth of Jews' influence and affluence. The second half of the volume includes essays on Orthodox Jews, the history of Jewish education in America, the rise of Jewish social clubs at the turn of the century, the history of southern and western Jewry, Jewish responses to Nazism and the Holocaust, feminism's confrontation with Judaism, and the eternal question of what defines American Jewish culture. Original and elegantly crafted, The Columbia History of Jews and Judaism in America not only introduces the student to a thrilling history, but also provides the scholar with new perspectives and insights.

The Columbia History Of Jews And Judaism In America

Author: Marc Lee Raphael
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 9780231132220
Size: 54.34 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 7770
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This collection focuses on a variety of important themes in the American Jewish and Judaic experience. It opens with essays on early Jewish settlers (1654-1820), the expansion of Jewish life in America (1820-1901), the great wave of eastern European Jewish immigrants (1880-1924), the character of American Judaism between the two world wars, American Jewish life from the end of World War II to the Six-Day War, and the growth of Jews' influence and affluence. The second half of the volume includes essays on Orthodox Jews, the history of Jewish education in America, the rise of Jewish social clubs at the turn of the century, the history of southern and western Jewry, Jewish responses to Nazism and the Holocaust, feminism's confrontation with Judaism, and the eternal question of what defines American Jewish culture. Original and elegantly crafted, "The Columbia History of Jews and Judaism in America" not only introduces the student to a thrilling history, but also provides the scholar with new perspectives and insights.

Interpreting American Jewish History At Museums And Historic Sites

Author: Avi Y. Decter
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1442264365
Size: 66.51 MB
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Interpreting American Jewish History at Museums and Historic Sites begins with a broad overview of American Jewish history in the context of a religious culture than extends back more than 3,000 years and which manifests itself in a variety of distinctive American forms. Five chapters examine key themes in American Jewish history: movement, home life, community, prejudice, and culture. Each thematic chapter is followed by a series of case studies that describe and analyze a variety of projects by historical organizations to interpret American Jewish life and culture for general public audiences. The last two chapters of the book are a history of Jewish collections and Jewish museums in North America and a look at “next practice,” intended to promote continuous innovation, new thinking, and programming that is responsive to ever-changing circumstances.

The Synagogue In America

Author: Marc Lee Raphael
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 081477704X
Size: 38.29 MB
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In 1789, when George Washington was elected the first president of the United States, laymen from all six Jewish congregations in the new nation sent him congratulatory letters. He replied to all six. Thus, after more than a century of Jewish life in colonial America the small communities of Jews present at the birth of the nation proudly announced their religious institutions to the country and were recognized by its new leader. By this time, the synagogue had become the most significant institution of American Jewish life, a dominance that was not challenged until the twentieth century, when other institutions such as Jewish community centers or Jewish philanthropic organizations claimed to be the hearts of their Jewish communities. Concise yet comprehensive, The Synagogue in America is the first history of this all-important structure, illuminating its changing role within the American Jewish community over the course of three centuries. From Atlanta and Des Moines to Los Angeles and New Orleans, Marc Lee Raphael moves beyond the New York metropolitan area to examine Orthodox, Reform, Conservative, and Reconstuctionist synagogue life everywhere. Using the records of approximately 125 Jewish congregations, he traces the emergence of the synagogue in the United States from its first instances in the colonial period, when each of the half dozen initial Jewish communities had just one synagogue each, to its proliferation as the nation and the American Jewish community grew and diversified. Encompassing architecture, forms of worship, rabbinic life, fundraising, creative liturgies, and feminism, The Synagogue in America is the go-to history for understanding the synagogue’s significance in American Jewish life.

Women And Judaism

Author: Frederick E. Greenspahn
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814732186
Size: 20.92 MB
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Although women constitute half of the Jewish population and have always played essential roles in ensuring Jewish continuity and the preservation of Jewish beliefs and values, only recently have their contributions and achievements received sustained scholarly attention. Scholars have begun to investigate Jewish women’s domestic, economic, intellectual, spiritual, and creative roles in Jewish life from biblical times to the present. Yet little of this important work has filtered down beyond specialists in their respective academic fields. Women and Judaism brings the broad new insights they have uncovered to the world. Women and Judaism communicates this research to a wider public of students and educated readers outside of the academy by presenting accessible and engaging chapters written by key senior scholars that introduce the reader to different aspects of women and Judaism. The contributors discuss feminist approaches to Jewish law and Torah study, the spirituality of Eastern European Jewish women, Jewish women in American literature, and many other issues. Contributors: Nehama Aschkenasy, Judith R. Baskin, Sylvia Barack Fishman, Harriet Pass Freidenreich, Esther Fuchs, Judith Hauptman, Sara R. Horowitz, Renée Levine, Pamela S. Nadell, and Dvora Weisberg.

Ballots Babies And Banners Of Peace

Author: Melissa R. Klapper
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814748953
Size: 33.41 MB
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Winner of the 2013 National Jewish Book Award, Women's Studies Ballots, Babies, and Banners of Peace explores the social and political activism of American Jewish women from approximately 1890 to the beginnings of World War II. Written in an engaging style, the book demonstrates that no history of the birth control, suffrage, or peace movements in the United States is complete without analyzing the impact of Jewish women's presence. The volume is based on years of extensive primary source research in more than a dozen archives and among hundreds of primary sources, many of which have previously never been seen. Voluminous personal papers and institutional records paint a vivid picture of a world in which both middle-class and working-class American Jewish women were consistently and publicly engaged in all the major issues of their day and worked closely with their non-Jewish counterparts on behalf of activist causes. This extraordinarily well researched volume makes a unique contribution to the study of modern women's history, modern Jewish history, and the history of American social movements. Instructor's Guide

American Post Judaism

Author: Shaul Magid
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 0253008026
Size: 31.74 MB
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Articulates a new, post-ethnic American Jewishness

The Wiley Blackwell History Of Jews And Judaism

Author: Alan T. Levenson
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118232933
Size: 67.80 MB
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In The Wiley-Blackwell History of Jews and Judaism, a teamof internationally-renowned scholars offer a comprehensive andauthoritative overview of Jewish life and culture, from thebiblical period to contemporary times. Provides a comprehensive and authoritative overview of the mainperiods and themes of Jewish history, from Biblical Israel, throughmedieval and early modern periods, to Judaism since the Holocaust,the Arab-Israeli conflict, and Judaism today Brings together an international team of established andemerging scholars across a range of disciplines Discusses how to present Judaism - to both non-Jews and Jews -as a religious system on its own terms and with its own uniquevocabulary Explores the latest scholarship on a range of issues, includingfolk practices, politics, economic structure, the relationship ofJudaism to Christianity, and the nature of Zionism diaspora and itsimplications for contemporary Israel Considers Jewish historiography and the lives of ordinarypeople, the achievements of Jewish women, and the sustainedinteraction of Jews within the environments they inhabited Edited by a leading scholar in Jewish studies and history

Creating Judaism

Author: Michael L. Satlow
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 9780231134897
Size: 40.76 MB
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How can we define "Judaism," and what are the common threads uniting ancient rabbis, Maimonides, the authors of the Zohar, and modern secular Jews in Israel? Michael L. Satlow offers a fresh perspective on Judaism that recognizes both its similarities and its immense diversity. Presenting snapshots of Judaism from around the globe and throughout history, Satlow explores the links between vastly different communities and their Jewish traditions. He studies the geonim, rabbinical scholars who lived in Iraq from the ninth to twelfth centuries; the intellectual flourishing of Jews in medieval Spain; how the Hasidim of nineteenth-century Eastern Europe confronted modernity; and the post-World War II development of distinct American and Israeli Jewish identities. Satlow pays close attention to how communities define themselves, their relationship to biblical and rabbinic texts, and their ritual practices. His fascinating portraits reveal the amazingly creative ways Jews have adapted over time to social and political challenges and continue to remain a "Jewish family."

American Jewry

Author: Eli Lederhendler
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521196086
Size: 55.50 MB
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In the United States, Jews have bridged minority and majority cultures - their history illustrates the diversity of the American experience.