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The Presidency In Black And White

Author: April Ryan
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1538106647
Size: 37.33 MB
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2016 NAACP Image Award Nominee, Essence Top 10 books of 2015, African American Literary Show Inc. 2015 Best Non Fiction Award When the award-winning The Presidency in Black and White first appeared, readers were captivated by journalist April Ryan’s compelling behind-the-scenes look at race relations from the epicenter of American power and policy making—the White House. As a White House correspondent since 1997, Ryan provides unique insights on the presidencies of Bill Clinton, George W. Bush, and Barack Obama. In the updated paperback edition, Ryan contributes a new afterword, chronicling the country’s growing racial divide, the end of the Obama era, the increasingly contentious Trump White House, and prospects for race relations in the Trump presidency.

What Works At Historically Black Colleges And Universities Hbcus

Author: Tiffany Beth Mfume
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1475818971
Size: 51.72 MB
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What Works at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs): Nine Strategies for Increasing Retention and Graduation Rates will have broad appeal within the field of education and beyond. While the primary audience for this book is the faculty, staff, administrators, students, alumni, and campus community of the current 105 HBCUs in the United States, this book is written to appeal to all professionals in the field of higher education, guidance counselors and administrators in P-12 education, sociologists and social scientists, and scholars who study change management, outcomes assessment, and success in any organized structure or system.

America Is Not Post Racial Xenophobia Islamophobia Racism And The 44th President

Author: Algernon Austin
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1440841268
Size: 21.96 MB
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This book is the first in-depth examination of the 25 million Americans with the most intense hatred of President Obama—arguably the most Republican-friendly of recent Democratic presidents—and what the mindsets of these "Obama Haters" teach us about race and ethnicity in America today. • Offers a critique of Obama from the left on his health insurance reform, judicial and political appointments, civil liberties policies, educational reforms, and strategy for dealing with African American concerns • Presents hard data showing that Obama Haters are so extreme in their conservatism and in their anti-immigrant, anti-Muslim, and anti-black attitudes that in comparison, Tea Party supporters appear to be moderate • Boldly identifies strategies for dealing with white racial anxiety about a diversifying America • Provides empirically derived estimates of the percentage of the American public with strong anti-black, anti-Latino, anti-immigrant, and anti-Muslim attitudes

Obama And Race

Author: Richard H King
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317995511
Size: 14.80 MB
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In this collection, academics from both sides of the Atlantic analyze the confluence of a politician, a process, and a problem - Barack Obama, the 2008 US presidential election, and the 'problem' of race in contemporary America. The special focus falls upon Barack Obama himself, who appears in many guises: as an individual from biracial and transnational backgrounds; a skilled, urban African-American organizer and then politician; and as intellectual and author of a bestselling autobiographical exploration. There is a certain representative quality about Obama that makes him a convenient way into the labyrinth of American race relations, national and regional politics (including the South and Hawaii), and past history (particularly from the 1960s to the present). Contributors also explore the role Michelle Obama has played in this process, both separately from and together with her husband, while one theme running through many chapters concerns the myriad ways that the American left, right and centre differ on the nature and future of race in a country that daily becomes more mixed in ethnic and racial terms. Race is everywhere; race is nowhere. The essays are grouped by their approach to the topic of Obama and race: via historical analysis, cultural studies, political science and sociology, as well as pedagogy. The result is an exciting mix of perspectives on one of the most fascinating phenomena of our time. This book was originally published as a special issue of the journal Patterns of Prejudice.

Vibe

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Vibe is the lifestyle guide to urban music and culture including celebrities, fashion, beauty, consumer electronics, automotive, personal care/grooming, and, always, music. Edited for a multicultural audience Vibe creates trends as much as records them.

Hatred For Black People

Author: Shehu Sani
Publisher: Xlibris Corporation
ISBN: 149312076X
Size: 77.25 MB
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In the Arab nation of Libya, black migrant workers were targeted, killed, maimed, and raped in a pogrom that ensured in the aftermath of the NATOaided revolution. The nation of Mauritania stripped the black population of their citizenship. The State of Israel rounded up sub-Saharan blacks and deported them as illegal immigrants. Black football players in Ukraine had banana thrown at them by racist fans. In Italy, a black footballer protested being called a monkey. Black pupils like Damilola Taylor in Britain are often targeted and hacked with knives. Argentine black populations have disappeared in history. In 1988, in Hohai University, China, a riot broke out against black people because they are dating Chinese girls with Chinese students shouting kill the black devils. Black students in India risk life in a denied culture of racism. In the United States, from Rosa Parks to Trayvon Martins, a racist-free society, is still a dream. This book investigates and reveals the art, the culture, the politics, the science, the sociology, the psychology, and the hypocrisy of the resentment against black people in a world that is said to be civilized. Why are black people so hated? What are the scientifi c, cultural, and historical factors that informed such negative perception and despicable mentality? The book navigates the mind-set of those who think to be black is to be cursed whether as individuals, a state, institutions, or an organization. Despite all the enormous achievements and advancements in all fi elds of human endeavors recorded by man, despite all the universal and natural values of freedom, fundamental rights and democracy as proclaimed by man, people of black colour are still despised, disrespected, and perceived differently. This book tries to exclusively dig out the truth and present it bare.

Religion Of A Different Color

Author: W. Paul Reeve
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190226277
Size: 41.45 MB
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Mormonism is one of the few homegrown religions in the United States, one that emerged out of the religious fervor of the early nineteenth century. Yet, members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints have struggled for status and recognition. In this book, W. Paul Reeve explores the ways in which nineteenth century Protestant white America made outsiders out of an inside religious group. Much of what has been written on Mormon otherness centers upon economic, cultural, doctrinal, marital, and political differences that set Mormons apart from mainstream America. Reeve instead looks at how Protestants racialized Mormons, using physical differences in order to define Mormons as non-White to help justify their expulsion from Ohio, Missouri, and Illinois. He analyzes and contextualizes the rhetoric on Mormons as a race with period discussions of the Native American, African American, Oriental, Turk/Islam, and European immigrant races. He also examines how Mormon male, female, and child bodies were characterized in these racialized debates. For instance, while Mormons argued that polygamy was ordained by God, and so created angelic, celestial, and elevated offspring, their opponents suggested that the children were degenerate and deformed. The Protestant white majority was convinced that Mormonism represented a racial-not merely religious-departure from the mainstream and spent considerable effort attempting to deny Mormon whiteness. Being white brought access to political, social, and economic power, all aspects of citizenship in which outsiders sought to limit or prevent Mormon participation. At least a part of those efforts came through persistent attacks on the collective Mormon body, ways in which outsiders suggested that Mormons were physically different, racially more similar to marginalized groups than they were white. Medical doctors went so far as to suggest that Mormon polygamy was spawning a new race. Mormons responded with aspirations toward whiteness. It was a back and forth struggle between what outsiders imagined and what Mormons believed. Mormons ultimately emerged triumphant, but not unscathed. Mormon leaders moved away from universalistic ideals toward segregated priesthood and temples, policies firmly in place by the early twentieth century. So successful were Mormons at claiming whiteness for themselves that by the time Mormon Mitt Romney sought the White House in 2012, he was labeled "the whitest white man to run for office in recent memory." Ending with reflections on ongoing views of the Mormon body, this groundbreaking book brings together literatures on religion, whiteness studies, and nineteenth century racial history with the history of politics and migration.

Talking With The President

Author: John Wilson
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190266856
Size: 58.93 MB
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This book provides a pragmatic analysis of presidential language. Pragmatics is concerned with "meaning in context," or the relationship between what we say and what we mean. John Wilson explores the various ways in which U.S. Presidents have used language within specific social contexts to achieve specific objectives. This includes obfuscation, misdirection, the use of metaphor or ambiguity, or in some cases simply lying. He focuses on six presidents: John F. Kennedy, Richard M. Nixon, Ronald W. Reagan, William F. Clinton, George W. Bush, and Barack H. Obama. These presidents cover most of the last half of the twentieth century, and the first decade of the twenty first century, and each has been associated with a specific linguistic quality. John F. Kennedy was famed for his quality of oratory, Nixon for his manipulative use of language, Reagan for his gift of telling stories, Clinton for his ability to engage the public and to linguistically turn arguments and descriptions in particular directions. Bush, on the other hand, was famed for his inability to use language appropriately, and Obama returns us to the rhetorical flourishes of early Kennedy. In the case of each president, a range of specific examples are explored in order to highlight the ways in which a pragmatic analysis may provide an insight into presidential language. In many cases, what the president says is not necessarily what the president means.

Lies My Teacher Told Me

Author: James Loewen
Publisher: The New Press
ISBN: 1595586539
Size: 14.43 MB
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Since its first publication in 1995, Lies My Teacher Told Me has gone on to win an American Book Award, the Oliver Cromwell Cox Award for Distinguished Anti-Racist Scholarship, and to sell over half a million copies in its various editions. What started out as a survey of the twelve leading American history textbooks has ended up being what the San Francisco Chronicle calls “an extremely convincing plea for truth in education.” In Lies My Teacher Told Me, James W. Loewen brings history alive in all its complexity and ambiguity. Beginning with pre-Columbian history and ranging over characters and events as diverse as Reconstruction, Helen Keller, the first Thanksgiving, and the Mai Lai massacre, Loewen offers an eye-opening critique of existing textbooks, and a wonderful retelling of American history as it should—and could—be taught to American students. This 10th anniversary edition features a handsome new cover and a new introduction by the author.

The South Vs The South

Author: William W. Freehling
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0195130278
Size: 55.95 MB
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Examines how the whites living in the border states during the Civil War and the slaves themselves helped to contribute to the defeat of the Confederate forces.