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The Sky And Earth Touched Me

Author: Joseph Bharat Cornell
Publisher: Crystal Clarity Pubs
ISBN: 9781565892828
Size: 42.14 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Wild seashores and woodlands calm and refresh our spirits. Contact with nature enhances our wholeness and well-being. The powerful, compelling exercises in this book can help readers become immersed in nature's joyful and healing presence. ReadThe Sky and Earth Touched Me in a garden, backyard, or park. Part One is designed for personal practice; Part Two can be shared with a friend or a group. Practice these exercises, and discover invaluable nature awareness principles.

Working With Earth Energies

Author: David Furlong
Publisher: Hachette UK
ISBN: 0349406146
Size: 74.81 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Working with Earth Energies is the new book from leading healer and spiritual teacher, David Furlong, which tells you how to reconnect with the Earth and nature. He will teach you how to connect not only with plants and trees, but with sacred sites whilst feeling the love and energy of the Earth itself. Through basic exercises and instructions, you will learn: How to communicate with the spirits of nature How to balance the energy of your home and environment How to clear the energy of a place after a traumatic event How to release ghosts and lost souls How to protect yourself and reverse spells and rituals How to set up your own Earth healing group

Walking In Light

Author: Sandra Ingerman
Publisher: Sounds True
ISBN: 162203452X
Size: 60.31 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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A shaman can serve as a healer, storyteller, and a keeper of wisdom—but most of all, teaches Sandra Ingerman, “Shamans radiate a light that uplifts everybody. In our culture, we tend to focus on methods and forget that the greatest way we can offer healing to the world is to become a vessel of love.” With Walking in Light, this renowned teacher offers a complete guide for living in a shamanic way—empowered by purpose, focus, and a deep connection to the spiritual dimensions. “Shamanism remains so relevant because it continues to evolve to meet the needs of the times and culture,” teaches Sandra. Here you are invited to participate in the modern evolution of this ancient and powerful form of spirituality, featuring: • Foundational practices—lucid instruction on the shamanic journey, ceremonies, and other techniques for accessing the hidden realms of spirit • Compassionate spirits, allies, and ancestors—how to contact and build a relationship with your power animals and spiritual helpers • Healing from a shamanic perspective—practices that can integrate with and enhance any healing modality • Guidance for deepening your connection with the environment and the rhythms of the natural world • Ways to cultivate a rich inner landscape that empowers your intentions and actions in every aspect of your life, and much more Walking in Light is a comprehensive resource filled with practical techniques, indigenous wisdom, and invaluable guidance for both new and experienced shamanic practitioners. Most importantly, Sandra Ingerman illuminates the meaning behind the practices—revealing our universe as a place where spirit is the ultimate reality, where our intentions shape our world, and where unseen allies support us on every step of our journey.

Lovely Lonely Life A Woman S Village Journal 1973 1982 Volume I

Author: Mary Kelly Black
Publisher: Xlibris Corporation
ISBN: 9781462802005
Size: 11.28 MB
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These journal entries comprise two volumes of selections (Vol. I, 1973-1982, Vol. II, 1983-2003). Volume I includes an Introduction and some biographical memories. As Stephane Mallarme considered literature the antithesis of journalism, a journal is often the antithesis of a diary. It is of less interest to record moods and events, or barriers to self-realization, than to have ideas and insights about these. As a journal-keeper, I am generally disinterested in diurnal details, unless these form the compost of deeper exploration or revelation, seeking insight into my condition, not simply its description. A journal, therefore, is often more complex and difficult than a diary, far less personal in depictions of daily fortune, using everyday experiences as a stepstool (at the least) to peer beyond the walls of psychological enclosure. I did not choose the journal form to mask the personal, to belittle or avoid it, but to reflect my most intimate assessment of the personal as contributing to something greater: comprehension. It is not enough merely to record the frustrations, joys or barriers of living, without appraising these for what they represent and suggest, where we learn not merely reiterate. The ideal criteria of selection and discrimination apply not only to ones journal, but to life as well, adding a mythological drama and perspective that immersion alone does not permit. In some ways, journalizing is similar in impulse to the pastoral ethos or motif familiar in contemplative writing from Virgil to Thoreau: one withdraws from active society, toward natural or rural settings, in search of some form of respite, then returns to tell of their discoveries. Some critics have seen this as the organizing design of most North American fables--in fact, as the American mythology, seeking to heal the serious schism between our natural psyche and its more devastated environment; that is, a search for a middle ground (or via media) between the primitive and the technologically complex. This volume of journal selections resembles that motif, focusing on the withdrawal phase of a generally recuperative metaphysical cycle. Such solitude is intentional, a critical phase in the live/withdraw/live-again cycle of spiritual refreshment. A recuperative isolation can be experienced daily, if one is discriminating in how their time is spent, but is usually gained more intensely over long, purposefully reclusive periods. The motivations for my withdrawal were several, perhaps the strongest a propensity (as described of another Irish writer) for being nearly overcome by the variety of life. If not overcome, certainly fatigued by events in and of themselves. A reflective silence seemed essential to examine the roots of this propensity. An ideal of pure time, free of most distractions (human or otherwise), was also necessary for writing of the sort that interested me, the personally contemplative or mystical. Only through such reflection could I ever achieve a meaningful connection with the more active life that surrounded me. The predominant experience of solitude--especially in a society where the value of withdrawal is suspect or sporadic--is the figurative isolation one experiences throughout the entire cycle of withdrawal and re-emergence. It is generally difficult for lovers of action to comprehend this attraction to non-doing. One of the aims of solitude is to reunite philosophy and religion, or rather philosophy and awe, to not accept the social impoverishment of these universal needs for knowledge and worship. The asceticism of retreat was not solely the traditional and philosophical appeal of simplicity, but the freedom from income-producing and time-consuming work it permitted. For the solitary, however, an ideal of pure time must be united with an ideal of intimate association, if the mystical quest is to be emotionally as well a