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The Struggle To Save The Soviet Economy

Author: Chris Miller
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469630184
Size: 80.56 MB
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For half a century the Soviet economy was inefficient but stable. In the late 1980s, to the surprise of nearly everyone, it suddenly collapsed. Why did this happen? And what role did Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev's economic reforms play in the country's dissolution? In this groundbreaking study, Chris Miller shows that Gorbachev and his allies tried to learn from the great success story of transitions from socialism to capitalism, Deng Xiaoping's China. Why, then, were efforts to revitalize Soviet socialism so much less successful than in China? Making use of never-before-studied documents from the Soviet politburo and other archives, Miller argues that the difference between the Soviet Union and China--and the ultimate cause of the Soviet collapse--was not economics but politics. The Soviet government was divided by bitter conflict, and Gorbachev, the ostensible Soviet autocrat, was unable to outmaneuver the interest groups that were threatened by his economic reforms. Miller's analysis settles long-standing debates about the politics and economics of perestroika, transforming our understanding of the causes of the Soviet Union's rapid demise.

When The World Seemed New

Author: Jeffrey A. Engel
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 0547423063
Size: 18.81 MB
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The untold story of how George H. W. Bush faced a critical turning point of history--the end of the Cold War--based on unprecedented access to heretofore classified documents and dozens of interviews with key policymakers.

New Perspectives On The End Of The Cold War

Author: Bernhard Blumenau
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351744909
Size: 61.64 MB
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This collection of essays makes a significant contribution to the historiography of the end of the Cold War. Research on the causes and consequences of the end of the Cold War is constantly growing. Initially, it was dominated by fairly simplistic, and often politically motivated, debates revolving around the role played by major "winners" and "losers". This volume addresses a number of diverse issues and seeks to challenge several "common wisdoms" about the end of the Cold War. Together, the contributions provide insights on the role of personalities as well as the impact of transnational movements and forces on the unexpected political transformations of the late 1980s and early 1990s. Geographically, the chapters largely focus on the United States, Europe, with special emphasis on Germany, and the Soviet Union. The individual chapters are drawn together by the overarching theme relating to a particular "common wisdom": were the transformations that occurred truly "unexpected"? This collection of essays will make an important contribution to the growing literature on the developments that produced the collapse of the Iron Curtain, the demise of the Soviet Union and the end of the Cold War. This volume will be of much interest to students of Cold War Studies, International History, European Politics and International Relations in general.

The Final Act

Author: Michael Cotey Morgan
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400888875
Size: 53.77 MB
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The first in-depth account of the historic diplomatic agreement that served as a blueprint for ending the Cold War The Helsinki Final Act was a watershed of the Cold War. Signed by thirty-five European and North American leaders at a summit in Finland in the summer of 1975, the agreement presented a vision for peace based on common principles and cooperation across the Iron Curtain. The Final Act is the first in-depth account of the diplomatic saga that produced this historic agreement. Drawing on research in eight countries and multiple languages, this gripping book explains the Final Act’s emergence from the parallel crises of the Soviet bloc and the West during the 1960s, the strategies of the major players, and the conflicting designs for international order that animated the negotiations. Helsinki had originally been a Soviet idea. But after nearly three years of grinding negotiations, the Final Act reflected liberal democratic ideals more than communist ones. It rejected the Brezhnev Doctrine, provided for German reunification, endorsed human rights as a core principle of international security, committed countries to greater transparency in economic and military affairs, and promoted the freer movement of people and information across borders. Instead of restoring the legitimacy of the Soviet bloc, Helsinki established principles that undermined it. The definitive history of the origins and legacy of this important agreement, The Final Act shows how it served as a blueprint for ending the Cold War, and how, when that conflict finally came to a close, the great powers established a new international order based on Helsinki’s enduring principles.

From Cold War To Hot Peace

Author: Michael McFaul
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 0544716256
Size: 32.41 MB
Format: PDF
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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER From the diplomat Putin wants to interrogate—and has banned from Russia—a revelatory, inside account of U.S.-Russia relations from 1989 to the present “A fascinating and timely account of the current crisis in the relationship between Russia and the United States.” —New York Times Book Review Putin would need an enemy, and he turned to the most reliable one in Russia’s recent history: the United States and then, by extension, me. In 2008, when Michael McFaul was asked to leave his perch at Stanford and join an unlikely presidential campaign, he had no idea that he would find himself at the beating heart of one of today’s most contentious and consequential international relationships. As President Barack Obama’s adviser on Russian affairs, McFaul helped craft the United States’ policy known as “reset” that fostered new and unprecedented collaboration between the two countries. And then, as U.S. ambassador to Russia from 2012 to 2014, he had a front-row seat when this fleeting, hopeful moment crumbled with Vladimir Putin’s return to the presidency. This riveting inside account combines history and memoir to tell the full story of U.S.-Russia relations from the fall of the Soviet Union to the new rise of the hostile, paranoid Russian president. From the first days of McFaul’s ambassadorship, the Kremlin actively sought to discredit and undermine him, hassling him with tactics that included dispatching protesters to his front gates, slandering him on state media, and tightly surveilling him, his staff, and his family. From Cold War to Hot Peace is an essential account of the most consequential global confrontation of our time.

A History Of Russia The Soviet Union And Beyond

Author: David MacKenzie
Publisher: Wadsworth Publishing Company
ISBN:
Size: 69.14 MB
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This text presents a comprehensive look at the history of Russia and the other republics of the former Soviet Union from the beginnings in ancient Russia to the present. The book provides a balanced view of Russian and Soviet history, treating not only political, military, and diplomatic history, but socioeconomic, religious, and cultural history of the region as well.

Ten Years That Shook The World

Author: Valeriĭ Ivanovich Boldin
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 20.19 MB
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A key Gorbachev aide offers an inside look at the collapse of communism and the Soviet Union, discussing the skills that propelled Gorbachev to the top, the creation of perestroika, the Chernobyl disaster, and other issues. National ad/promo.

The End Of The Cold War

Author: Robert Service
Publisher: Pan Macmillan
ISBN: 1447287282
Size: 71.19 MB
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The Cold War had seemed like a permanent fixture in global politics, and until its denouement, no Western or Soviet politician foresaw that the stand-off between the two superpowers - after decades of struggle over every aspect of security, politics, economics and ideas - would end in their lifetimes. Even after March 1985 when Mikhail Gorbachëv became the leader of the Soviet Union it was not preordained that global nuclear Armageddon could or would be averted peaceably. But just four years later, the Berlin Wall was dismantled and perestroika spread throughout the former Soviet bloc. It was a sea change in world history, which resulted in the dissolution of the Soviet Union. Drawing on pioneering archival research, Robert Service's gripping new investigation of the final years of the Cold War pinpoints the astonishing relationships among President Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachëv, Secretary of State George Shultz and the USSR's last Foreign Affairs Minister, Eduard Shevardnadze, who found a way to cooperate during times of extraordinary change around the world. The story is of American pressure and Soviet long-term decline and over-stretch. The End of the Cold War shows how that small, skillful group of statesmen were determined to end the Cold War on their watch. In the process, they irreversibly transformed the global geopolitical landscape. Authoritative, compelling and meticulously researched, this is political history at its best.

Unwanted Visionaries

Author: Sergey Radchenko
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199938776
Size: 22.68 MB
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In this broad-ranging and deeply researched second book, Sergey Radchenko gracefully narrates and analyzes the end of the Cold War in Asia. Radchenko sheds new light on the actions of Gorbachev, Deng Xiaoping, Margaret Thatcher, Boris Yeltsin, and George H.W. Bush, among others.

Russia America And The Cold War

Author: Martin McCauley
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317863860
Size: 23.92 MB
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The conflict between Russia and America shaped the world for over four decades. Both were universalist powers – they wanted every country in the world to copy their model of government and economy. They could not rest until the other side had been vanquished, and until the mid-1980s this included the prospect of nuclear war. In a new edition of one of the best-selling books in the Seminar Studies in History Series, Martin McCauley looks at the epic struggle between the two superpowers that put everyone in danger. In a clear and accessible manner, the book: Gives a succinct summary of the main turning points in the conflict Looks at how the whole world was sucked into the Cold War Shows how the arms race eventually bankrupted Russia Discusses whether or not America and Russia have learnt anything from this confrontation Also containing a Chronology, Glossary and Who’s Who of key figures, this revised second edition of Russia, America and the Cold War is essential reading for all students of twentieth century history. Martin McCauley is a seasoned writer and broadcaster who has a wealth of experience in Russian and international affairs. His recent publications include The Origins of the Cold War revised 3rd edition (2008), Stalin and Stalinism revised 3rd edition (2008) and The Rise and Fall of the Soviet Union (2007)