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The Swerve How The World Became Modern

Author: Stephen Greenblatt
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393083381
Size: 42.93 MB
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Winner of the 2012 Pulitzer Prize for Non-Fiction Winner of the 2011 National Book Award for Non-Fiction One of the world's most celebrated scholars, Stephen Greenblatt has crafted both an innovative work of history and a thrilling story of discovery, in which one manuscript, plucked from a thousand years of neglect, changed the course of human thought and made possible the world as we know it. Nearly six hundred years ago, a short, genial, cannily alert man in his late thirties took a very old manuscript off a library shelf, saw with excitement what he had discovered, and ordered that it be copied. That book was the last surviving manuscript of an ancient Roman philosophical epic, On the Nature of Things, by Lucretius—a beautiful poem of the most dangerous ideas: that the universe functioned without the aid of gods, that religious fear was damaging to human life, and that matter was made up of very small particles in eternal motion, colliding and swerving in new directions. The copying and translation of this ancient book-the greatest discovery of the greatest book-hunter of his age-fueled the Renaissance, inspiring artists such as Botticelli and thinkers such as Giordano Bruno; shaped the thought of Galileo and Freud, Darwin and Einstein; and had a revolutionary influence on writers such as Montaigne and Shakespeare and even Thomas Jefferson.

The Swerve

Author: Stephen Greenblatt
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781407496313
Size: 46.86 MB
Format: PDF
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Nearly six hundred years ago, On the Nature of Things by Lucretius was discovered on a library shelf. The book was the last surviving manuscript of an ancient Roman philosophical epic, filled with dangerous ideas: that the universe functioned without the aid of gods, that religious fear was damaging to human life and that matter was made up of very small particles in eternal motion. The copying and translation of this ancient book fuelled the Renaissance, inspiring artists such as Botticelli and thinkers such as Giordano Bruno; shaped the thought of Galileo and Freud, Darwin and Einstein; and had revolutionary influence on writers from Montaigne to Thomas Jefferson.

Will In The World

Author: Stephen Greenblatt
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 1446442594
Size: 29.75 MB
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Stephen Greenblatt's Will in the World is widely recognised to be the fullest and most brilliant account ever written of Shakespeare's life, his work and his age. Shakespeare was a man of his time, constantly engaging with his audience's deepest desires and fears, and by reconnecting with this historic reality we are able to experience the true character of the playwright himself. Greenblatt traces Shakespeare's unfolding imaginative generosity - his ability to inhabit others, to confer upon them his own strength of spirit, to make them truly live as independent beings as no other artist has ever done. Digging deep into the vital links between the playwright and his world, Will in the World provides the fullest account ever written of the living, breathing man behind the masterpieces.

Self Fashioning And Assumptions Of Identity In Medieval And Early Modern Iberia

Author:
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9004291008
Size: 51.45 MB
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In Self-Fashioning and Assumptions of Identity in Medieval and Early Modern Iberia, chapter authors assert the applicability of Stephen Greenblatt's self-fashioning theory, originally framed within Elizabethan England, to medieval and early modern Iberia in the fourteenth, fifteenth, and sixteenth centuries.

Person Place Thing

Author: John G. Hampton
Publisher: Neutral Ground Contemporary Art Forum
ISBN: 1895522250
Size: 40.51 MB
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The hidden language of objects and landscape considered through the work of five contemporary Canadian artists: Bonnie Devine, Michael Maranda, Loretta Paoli, Arthur Renwick and Laurel Woodcock.

Ceremonial Entries In Early Modern Europe

Author: J.R. Mulryne
Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
ISBN: 1472432053
Size: 43.14 MB
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The fourteen essays that comprise this volume concentrate on festival iconography, the visual and written languages, including ephemeral and permanent structures, costume, dramatic performance, inscriptions and published festival books that ‘voiced’ the social, political and cultural messages incorporated in processional entries in the countries of early modern Europe. The volume also includes a transcript of the newly-discovered Register of Lionardo di Zanobi Bartholini, a Florentine merchant, which sets out in detail the expenses for each worker for the possesso (or Entry) of Pope Leo X to Rome in April 1513.

Arts Research Innovation And Society

Author: Gerald Bast
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3319099094
Size: 48.22 MB
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This book explores – at the macro, meso and micro levels and in terms of qualitative as well as quantitative studies – theories, policies and practices about the contributions of artistic research and innovations towards defining new forms of knowledge, knowledge production, as well as knowledge diffusion, absorption and use. Artistic research, artistic innovations and arts-based innovations have been major transformers, as well as disruptors, of the ways in which societies, economies, and political systems perform. Ramifications here refer to the epistemic socio-economic, socio-political and socio-technical base and aesthetic considerations on the one hand, as well as to strategies, policies, and practices on the other, including sustainable enterprise excellence, considerations in the context of knowledge economies, societies and democracies. Creativity in general, and the arts in particular, are increasingly recognized as drivers of cultural, economic, political, social, and scientific innovation and development. This book examines how one could derive and develop insights in these areas from the four vantage points of Arts, Research, Innovation and Society. Among the principal questions that are examined include: - Could and should artists be researchers? - How are the systems of the Arts and Sciences connected and/or disconnected? - What is the impact of the arts in societal development? - How are the Arts interrelated with the mechanisms of generating social, scientific and economic innovation? As the inaugural book in the Arts, Research, Innovation and Society series, this book uses a thematically wide spectrum that serves as a general frame of reference for the entire series of books to come.

The Rise And Fall Of Adam And Eve

Author: Stephen Greenblatt
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 1448182611
Size: 54.34 MB
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Selected as a book of the year 2017 by The Times and Sunday Times What is it about Adam and Eve’s story that fascinates us? What does it tell us about how our species lives, dies, works or has sex? The mythic tale of Adam and Eve has shaped conceptions of human origins and destiny for centuries. Stemming from a few verses in an ancient book, it became not just the foundation of three major world faiths, but has evolved through art, philosophy and science to serve as the mirror in which we seem to glimpse the whole, long history of our fears and desires. In a quest that begins at the dawn of time, Stephen Greenblatt takes us from ancient Babylonia to the forests of east Africa. We meet evolutionary biologists and fossilised ancestors; we grapple with morality and marriage in Milton’s Paradise Lost; and we decide if the Fall is the unvarnished truth or fictional allegory.

Worlds Without End

Author: Mary-Jane Rubenstein
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 023152742X
Size: 11.63 MB
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"Multiverse" cosmologies imagine our universe as just one of a vast number of others. While this idea has captivated philosophy, religion, and literature for millennia, it is now being considered as a scientific hypothesis—with different models emerging from cosmology, quantum mechanics, and string theory. Beginning with ancient Atomist and Stoic philosophies, Mary-Jane Rubenstein links contemporary models of the multiverse to their forerunners and explores the reasons for their recent appearance. One concerns the so-called fine-tuning of the universe: nature's constants are so delicately calibrated that it seems they have been set just right to allow life to emerge. For some thinkers, these "fine-tunings" are evidence of the existence of God; for others, however, and for most physicists, "God" is an insufficient scientific explanation. Hence the allure of the multiverse: if all possible worlds exist somewhere, then like monkeys hammering out Shakespeare, one universe is bound to be suitable for life. Of course, this hypothesis replaces God with an equally baffling article of faith: the existence of universes beyond, before, or after our own, eternally generated yet forever inaccessible to observation or experiment. In their very efforts to sidestep metaphysics, theoretical physicists propose multiverse scenarios that collide with it and even produce counter-theological narratives. Far from invalidating multiverse hypotheses, Rubenstein argues, this interdisciplinary collision actually secures their scientific viability. We may therefore be witnessing a radical reconfiguration of physics, philosophy, and religion in the modern turn to the multiverse.