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Ultimate Punishment

Author: Scott Turow
Publisher: Pan Macmillan
ISBN: 1447207165
Size: 11.58 MB
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As a pioneer of the modern legal novel and a criminal lawyer, Scott Turow has been involved with the death penalty for more than a decade, including successfully representing two different men convicted in death-penalty prosecutions. In Ultimate Punishment, a vivid account of how his views on the death penalty have evolved, Turow describes his own experiences with capital punishment from his days as an impassioned young prosecutor to his recent service on the Illinois commission which investigated the administration of the death penalty and influenced Governor George Ryan's unprecedented commutation of the sentences of 164 death row inmates on his last day in office. Along the way, he provides a brief history of America's ambivalent relationship with the ultimate punishment, analyzes the potent reasons for and against it, including the role of the victims' survivors, and tells the powerful stories behind the statistics, as he moves from the Governor's Mansion to Illinois' state-of-the art 'super-max' prison and the execution chamber.

The Top Ten Death Penalty Myths

Author: Rudolph Joseph Gerber
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780275997809
Size: 42.94 MB
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Presents arguments debunking a variety of myths surrounding capital punishment in the United States.

Scott Turow

Author: Andrew Macdonald
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780313331152
Size: 73.98 MB
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Provides a literary analysis some of Turow's best-selling novels, and describes their structure, themes, character development, and plots.

False Justice

Author: Jim Petro
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317667719
Size: 52.34 MB
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Compelling and engagingly written, this book by former Attorney General of Ohio Jim Petro and his wife, writer Nancy Petro, takes the reader inside actual cases, summarizes extensive research on the causes and consequences of wrongful conviction, and exposes eight common myths that inspire false confidence in the justice system and undermine reform. Now newly published in paperback with an extensive list of web links to wrongful conviction sources internationally, False Justice is ideal for use in a wide array of criminal justice and criminology courses. Myth 1: Everyone in prison claims innocence. Myth 2: Our system almost never convicts an innocent person. Myth 3: Only the guilty confess. Myth 4: Wrongful conviction is the result of innocent human error. Myth 5: An eyewitness is the best testimony. Myth 6: Conviction errors get corrected on appeal. Myth 7: It dishonors the victim to question a conviction. Myth 8: If the justice system has problems, the pros will fix them.

The Death Penalty In The United States

Author: Louis J. Palmer, Jr.
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 1476605793
Size: 33.96 MB
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The death penalty landscape has changed considerably since the 1998 first edition of this book. For example, six states that had the death penalty—Connecticut, Illinois, Maryland, New Jersey, New Mexico and New York—no longer impose the punishment. Some of the changes set out in this second edition involve discussions of all of the significant cases decided by the United States Supreme Court after 1998, including Roper v. Simmons, 543 U.S. 551 (2005); Atkins v. Virginia, 536 U.S. 304 (2002); Schriro v. Smith, 126 S.Ct. 7 (2005); Harbison v. Bell, 129 S.Ct. 1481 (2009); Holmes v. South Carolina, 126 S.Ct. 1727 (2006); Kansas v. Marsh, 126 S.Ct. 2516 (2006); Ring v. Arizona, 536 U.S. 584 (2002); Sattazahn v. Pennsylvania, 537 U.S. 101 (2003). This new edition includes 13 new chapters. They cover such topics as capital felon’s defense team; habeas corpus, coram nobis and section 1983 proceedings; the Innocence protection act and post-conviction DNA testing; challenging the death sentence under racial justice acts; inhabited American territories; and the costs of capital punishment.

Religion And The Death Penalty

Author: Erik Owens
Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing
ISBN: 9780802821720
Size: 69.52 MB
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Series Foreword p. viii Foreword Jean Bethke Elshtain p. x Preface p. xiii Contributors p. xvi Religion and Capital Punishment: An Introduction Erik C. Owens and Eric P. Elshtain p. 1 I Faith Traditions and the Death Penalty 1. Catholic Teaching on the Death Penalty: Has It Changed? Avery Cardinal Dulles, S.J. p. 23 2. Can Capital Punishment Ever Be Justified in the Jewish Tradition? David Novak p. 31 3. The Death Penalty: A Protestant Perspective Gilbert Meilaender p. 48 4. Punishing Christians: A Pacifist Approach to the Issue of Capital Punishment Stanley Hauerwas p. 57 5. The Death Penalty, Mercy, and Islam: A Call for Retrospection Khaled Abou El Fadl p. 73 II Theological Reflections on the Death Penalty 6. Categorical Pardon: On the Argument for Abolishing Capital Punishment J. Budziszewski p. 109 7. Biblical Perspectives on the Death Penalty Michael L. Westmoreland-White and Glen H. Stassen p. 123 8. Christian Witness, Moral Anthropology, and the Death Penalty Richard W. Garnett p. 139 9. Human Nature, Limited Justice, and the Irony of Capital Punishment John D. Carlson p. 158 10. Responsibility, Vengeance, and the Death Penalty Victor Anderson p. 195 III Personal Commitments and Public Responsibilities 11. The Death Penalty: What's All the Debate About? Frank Keating p. 213 12. Reflections on the Death Penalty and the Moratorium George H. Ryan p. 221 13. God's Justice and Ours: The Morality of Judicial Participation in the Death Penalty Antonin Scalia p. 231 14. Why I Oppose Capital Punishment Mario M. Cuomo p. 240 15. Capital Punishment: Is It Wise? Paul Simon p. 248 16. Facing the Jury: The Moral Trials of a Prosecutor in a Capital Case Beth Wilkinson p. 254 17. The Problem of Forgiveness: Reflections of a Public Defender and a Murder Victim's Family Member Jeanne Bishop p. 264 Afterword: Lifting New Voices against the Death Penalty: Religious Americans and the Debate on Capital Punishment E.J. Dionne Jr. p. 277 Index.

Ordinary Heroes

Author: Scott Turow
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
ISBN: 9780374706173
Size: 80.36 MB
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Stewart Dubinsky knew his father had served in World War II. And he'd been told how David Dubin (as his father had Americanized the name that Stewart later reclaimed) had rescued Stewart's mother from the horror of the Balingen concentration camp. But when he discovers, after his father's death, a packet of wartime letters to a former fiancée, and learns of his father's court-martial and imprisonment, he is plunged into the mystery of his family's secret history and driven to uncover the truth about this enigmatic, distant man who'd always refused to talk about his war. As he pieces together his father's past through military archives, letters, and, finally, notes from a memoir his father wrote while in prison, secretly preserved by the officer who defended him, Stewart starts to assemble a dramatic and baffling chain of events. He learns how Dubin, a JAG lawyer attached to Patton's Third Army and desperate for combat experience, got more than he bargained for when he was ordered to arrest Robert Martin, a wayward OSS officer who, despite his spectacular bravery with the French Resistance, appeared to be acting on orders other than his commanders'. In pursuit of Martin, Dubin and his sergeant are parachuted into Bastogne just as the Battle of the Bulge reaches its apex. Pressed into the leadership of a desperately depleted rifle company, the men are forced to abandon their quest for Martin and his fiery, maddeningly elusive comrade, Gita, as they fight for their lives through carnage and chaos the likes of which Dubin could never have imagined. In reconstructing the terrible events and agonizing choices his father faced on the battlefield, in the courtroom, and in love, Stewart gains a closer understanding of his past, of his father's character, and of the brutal nature of war itself.

Capital Punishment On Trial

Author: David M. Oshinsky
Publisher: Univ Pr of Kansas
ISBN:
Size: 76.13 MB
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In his first book since the Pulitzer Prize--winning Polio: An American Story, renowned historian David Oshinsky takes a new and closer look at the Supreme Court's controversial and much-debated stances on capital punishment--in the landmark case of Furman v. Georgia. Career criminal William Furman shot and killed a homeowner during a 1967 burglary in Savannah, Georgia. Because it was a "black-on-white" crime in the racially troubled South, it also was an open-and-shut case. The trial took less than a day, and the nearly all-white jury rendered a death sentence. Aided by the NAACP's Legal Defense Fund, Furman's African-American attorney, Bobby Mayfield, doggedly appealed the verdict all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, which in 1972 overturned Furman's sentence by a narrow 5--4 vote, ruling that Georgia's capital punishment statute, and by implication all other state death-penalty laws, was so arbitrary and capricious as to violate the Eighth Amendment's prohibition against "cruel and unusual punishment." Furman effectively, if temporarily, halted capital punishment in the United States. Every death row inmate across the nation was resentenced to life in prison. The decision, however, did not rule the death penalty per se to be unconstitutional; rather, it struck down the laws that currently governed its application, leaving the states free to devise new ones that the Court might find acceptable. And this is exactly what happened. In the coming years, the Supreme Court would uphold an avalanche of state legislation endorsing the death penalty. Capital punishment would return stronger than ever, with many more defendants sentenced to death and eventually executed. Oshinsky demonstrates the troubling roles played by race and class and region in capital punishment. And he concludes by considering the most recent Supreme Court death-penalty cases involving minors and the mentally ill, as well as the impact of international opinion. Compact and engaging, Oshinsky's masterful study reflects a gift for empathy, an eye for the telling anecdote and portrait, and a talent for clarifying the complex and often confusing legal issues surrounding capital punishment.

Dialogues On The Ethics Of Capital Punishment

Author: Dale Jacquette
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Pub Incorporated
ISBN: 9780742561434
Size: 66.81 MB
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"One in the series New Dialogues in Philosophy, edited by the author himself, Dale Jacquette presents a fictional dialogue over a three-day period on the ethical complexities of capital punishment Jacquette moves his readers from outlining basic issues in matters of life and death, to questions of justice and compassion, with a concluding dialogue on the conditional and unconditional right to life. Jacquette's characters talk plainly and thoughtfully about the death penalty, and readers are left to determine for themselves how best to think about the morality of putting people to death."--BOOK JACKET.