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Victorian Medicine And Popular Culture

Author: Louise Penner
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317316711
Size: 43.26 MB
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This collection of essays explores the rise of scientific medicine and its impact on Victorian popular culture. Chapters include an examination of Dickens’s involvement with hospital funding, concerns over milk purity and the theatrical portrayal of drug addiction, plus a whole section devoted to medicine in crime fiction.

Companion To Victorian Popular Fiction

Author: Kevin A. Morrison
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 1476669031
Size: 56.91 MB
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"This companion to Victorian popular fiction includes more than 300 cross-referenced entries on works written for the British mass market. Entries introduce readers to long-overlooked authors who were widely read in their time, with suggestions for further reading and emerging resources for the study of popular fiction"--

The Routledge Research Companion To Nineteenth Century British Literature And Science

Author: John Holmes
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1317042344
Size: 15.42 MB
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Tracing the continuities and trends in the complex relationship between literature and science in the long nineteenth century, this companion provides scholars with a comprehensive, authoritative and up-to-date foundation for research in this field. In intellectual, material and social terms, the transformation undergone by Western culture over the period was unprecedented. Many of these changes were grounded in the growth of science. Yet science was not a cultural monolith then any more than it is now, and its development was shaped by competing world views. To cover the full range of literary engagements with science in the nineteenth century, this companion consists of twenty-seven chapters by experts in the field, which explore crucial social and intellectual contexts for the interactions between literature and science, how science affected different genres of writing, and the importance of individual scientific disciplines and concepts within literary culture. Each chapter has its own extensive bibliography. The volume as a whole is rounded out with a synoptic introduction by the editors and an afterword by the eminent historian of nineteenth-century science Bernard Lightman.

Charles Dickens And The Sciences Of Childhood

Author: K. Boehm
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137362502
Size: 50.93 MB
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This book takes a fresh look at childhood in Dickens' works and in Victorian science and culture more generally. It offers a new way of understanding Dickens' interest in childhood by showing how his fascination with new scientific ideas about childhood and practices of scientific inquiry shaped his narrative techniques and aesthetic imagination.

The Cultural Meaning Of Popular Science

Author: Roger Cooter
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521227438
Size: 79.89 MB
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This study concentrates on the social and ideological functions of science during the consolidation of urban industrial society.

Jewish Representation In British Literature 1780 1840

Author: M. Scrivener
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 0230120024
Size: 77.36 MB
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Describing Jewish representation by Jews and Gentiles in the British Romantic era from the Old Bailey courtroom and popular songs to novels, poetry, and political pamphlets, Scrivener integrates popular culture with belletristic writing to explore the wildly varying treatments of stereotypical Jewish figures.

Victorian Science In Context

Author: Bernard Lightman
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226481111
Size: 75.94 MB
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Victorian Science in Context captures the essence of this fascination, charting the many ways in which science influenced and was influenced by the larger Victorian culture. Leading scholars in history, literature, and the history of science explore questions such as, What did science mean to the Victorians? For whom was Victorian science written? What ideological messages did it convey?

Victorian Literature And Culture

Author: Maureen Moran
Publisher: A&C Black
ISBN: 1441169873
Size: 68.75 MB
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This guide to Victorian Literature and Culture provides students with the ideal introduction to literature and its context from 1837-1900, including: - the historical, cultural and intellectual background including politics and economics, popular culture, philosophy - major writers and genres including the Brontes, Dickens, Eliot, Hardy, Trollope, Thackeray, Conan Doyle, Ibsen, Shaw, Hopkins, Rossetti and Tennyson - concise explanations of key terms needed to understand the literature and criticism - key critical approaches - a chronology mapping historical events and literary works and further reading including websites and electronic resources.

The Victorians And The Ancient World

Author: Richard Pearson
Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Pub
ISBN:
Size: 11.82 MB
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In the nineteenth century, the ancient world became a very real presence for many writers and their publics, from the theatre-goers of popular pantomime to the intellectual thinkers in the academic and critical journals. The pre-eminence of the worlds of Greece and Rome was challenged by the discovery of Egyptian and Assyrian cultures, amongst other pre-Greek civilisations, and the worlds were brought to life in a series of high profile archaeological excavations and cultural exhibitions. Alongside the growing modernity of the Age of Steam, the whole of society was exposed to antiquity; architecture, painting, theatre, fiction and poetry, drew inspiration from the stories of the ancient writers, whilst the new museums and academies translated newly discovered languages and texts and excavated rediscovered ancient sites. The great civilisations, brimming with their own art and sculpted histories, were, however, contrasted by the traces of local, pre-civilised cultures of the West that existed before the coming of the Romans or in the Dark Ages immediately after their departure. The sense of a barbarity in man's past, a primitivism even, that may also be a survival into the modern age gradually grew in the Victorian mind as it uncovered the ancient sites of Britain and the prehistoric peoples of the Continent. It is during the post-Darwinian era of theories of social evolution, anthropology and ethnology that British and prehistorical archaeology began to find a public audience. This volume provides a series of readings from different disciplines that explore the presence of the ancient in nineteenth-century culture. The chapters demonstrate the range of the Victorian cultural preoccupation with civilisation and its primitive counterpoint and offer a combination of analyses of specific cultural events or traits, readings of particular Victorian texts and documents, and studies of exemplary Victorian figures and their personal engagements with antiquity. The book has been arranged to begin with archaeology and end with literary refashionings of the Classical, but the intertwinings of these elements in the Victorian period, as shown here, made the reaction to antiquity often an anxious and complex one.