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Young Educated Broke

Author: Jamie Borromeo
Publisher: Morgan James Publishing
ISBN: 1630470899
Size: 66.34 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Young, Educated & Broke is a unique blend of memoir and social commentary that highlights the author’s Millennial experience in America as a microcosm of the geopolitical and domestic affairs in American history during the 2008 economic collapse and the years that followed. Borromeo drafts a “Millennial Blueprint” for what she believes can spark a conversation between young people and current leadership to address the youth high unemployment rates and leadership issues in this country. In such uncertain times, Borromeo’s analysis leaves you inspired and hopeful as she writes a plan---and provides tangible proof---that her generation will be a formidable force in the next chapter of America’s history.

My Sociology

Author: Rosalind Gottfried
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1315402807
Size: 76.53 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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My Sociology reconceptualizes intro sociology for the changing demographics in today’s higher education environment. Concise and student-focused, My Sociology captures students' attention with engaging stories and a focus on non-dominant populations. Rather than introducing students to theory and history at the beginning of the text, the book integrates the necessary information throughout to keep students engaged.

A New Introduction To Poverty

Author: Louis Kushnick
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814742394
Size: 40.65 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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Visit the author's YouTube channel! When high school basketball player LeBron James was selected as the top pick in the National Basketball Association draft of 2003, the hopes of a half-million high school basketball players soared. If LeBron could go straight from high school to the NBA, why couldn't they? Such is the allure of basketball for so many young African American men. Unfortunately, the reality is that their chances of ever playing basketball at the professional, or even college, level are infinitesimal. In Living Through the Hoop, Reuben A. Buford May tells the absorbing story of the hopes and struggles of one high school basketball team. With a clear passion for the game, May grabs readers with both hands and pulls them onto the hardwood, going under the hoop and inside the locker room. May spent seven seasons as an assistant coach of the Northeast High School Knights in Northeast, Georgia. We meet players like Larique and Pooty Cat, hard-working and energetic young men, willing to play and practice basketball seven days a week and banking on the unlimited promise of the game. And we meet Coach Benson, their unorthodox, out-spoken, and fierce leader, who regularly coached them to winning seasons, twice going to the state tournaments Elite Eight championships. Beyond the wins and losses, May provides a portrait of the players’ hopes and aspirations, their home lives, and the difficulties they face in living in a poor and urban area — namely, the temptations of drugs and alcohol, violence in their communities, run-ins with the police, and unstable family lives. We learn what it means to become a man when you live in places that define manhood by how tough you can be, how many women you can have, and how much money you can hustle. May shows the powerful role that the basketball team can play in keeping these kids straight, away from street-life, focused on completing high school, and possibly even attending college. Their stories, and the double-edged sword of hoop dreams, is at the heart of this compelling story about young African American men’s struggle to find their way in an often grim world.

Progressive Reading Education In America

Author: Patrick Shannon
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 135172505X
Size: 47.33 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Through firsthand accounts of classroom practices, this new book ties 130 years of progressive education to social justice work. Based on their commitments to the principle of the equal moral worth of all people, progressive teachers have challenged the obstacles of schooling that prevent some people from participating as full partners in social life in and out of the classroom and have constructed classroom and social arrangements that enable all to participate as peers in the decisions that influence their lives. Progressive reading education has been and remains key to these ties, commitments, challenges, and constructions. The three goals in this book are to show that there are viable and worthy alternatives to the current version of "doing school"; to provide evidence of how progressive teachers have accommodated expanding notions of social justice across time, taking up issues of economic distribution of resources during the first half of the 20th century, adding the cultural recognition of the civil rights of more groups during the second half, and now, grappling with political representation of groups and individuals as national boundaries become porous; and to build coalitions around social justice work among advocates of differing, but complementary, theories and practices of literacy work. In progressive classrooms from Harlem to Los Angeles and Milwaukee to Fairhope, Alabama, students have used reading in order to make sense of and sense in changing times, working across economic, cultural, and political dimensions of social justice. Over 100 teacher stories invite readers to join the struggle to continue the pursuit of a just democracy in America.